Pictures & Records (21)

Norwalk, CT
Norwalk, CT
Original home lots
1776 CT Revolutionary War Rolls
1776 CT Revolutionary War Rolls
CT Record maintained by State Library, verification of Daniel Smith service to rebels
Hartford, Ct 1635
Hartford, Ct 1635
Adventurers and Pioneers settlement
Original settlement of Hartford, CT 1645
Original settlement of Hartford, CT 1645
Ad for Sale of Daniel Smith Property 1779
Ad for Sale of Daniel Smith Property 1779
From Connecticut Courant
Daniel Smith petition for Land in New Brunswick
Daniel Smith petition for Land in New Brunswick
pg1
 Daniel Smith petition for Land in New Brunswick
Daniel Smith petition for Land in New Brunswick
pg3
Daniel Smith petition for Land in New Brunswick
Daniel Smith petition for Land in New Brunswick
pg2
Confiscation of Daniel Smith property
Confiscation of Daniel Smith property
New Milford, CT June 1781
Blissville, Sunbury, NB land grants
Blissville, Sunbury, NB land grants
Location of Daniel's land grant in Blissville, Sunbury
Norwalk, CT
Norwalk, CT
1847 map of landowners, showing original home lots in south east corner
Daniel Smith, New Preston.png
Daniel Smith, New Preston.png
Baptism Lydia Smith, daughter Daniel and Ruth, from the records of Rev. Roger Viets, Simsbury, CT, St. Andrews Church
Clapman Smith, son of Daniel
Clapman Smith, son of Daniel
Provided by John Noble and Donna Van Eeghen, Clapman Smith descendants Blissville, Sunbury, NB
Benjamin Franklin Smith, gggrandson of Daniel
Benjamin Franklin Smith, gggrandson of Daniel
New Brunswick politican,provided by John Noble and Donna Van Eeghen--BF Smith descendants
Senator Benjamin Franklin Smith, Canada
Senator Benjamin Franklin Smith, Canada
Courtesy John Noble and Donna Van Eeghen
Benjamin Smith, Grandson of Daniel
Benjamin Smith, Grandson of Daniel
Jacksonville Cemetery, Carleton County, NB
Amelia Clark Smith, wife of Benjamin
Amelia Clark Smith, wife of Benjamin
Pioneer Cemetery, Blissvile, Sunbury, NB Courtesy John Noble and Donna Van Eeghen
Ruth Amelia Mitchell Smith and son, John.png
Ruth Amelia Mitchell Smith and son, John.png
Victoria Corner Cemetery, Carleton County, NB Coutesy John Noble and Donna Van Eeghen
George Frederick Smith, great grandson, Daniel Smith
George Frederick Smith, great grandson, Daniel Smith
Victoria Corner Cemetery, Carleton County, N.B.
Smith Ridge and Canoe Hill, New Canaan, CT Map
Smith Ridge and Canoe Hill, New Canaan, CT Map
Locations for property of Samuel Smith and his wife, Rachel Marvin, orginally in Canaan Part or Norwark until 1801 Source USGS Named Place Maps
Clapboard Hill, New Canaan, CT
Clapboard Hill, New Canaan, CT
Originally part of Norwlk
Show More

Personal Details

Edit
Family:
Daniel Smith: 1735 Born, Norwalk, CT 1
William Smith arrives in MA:
1635 in Weymouth, MA 1
Daniel Smith:
April 1783 Departs Lloyds Neck, NY 1
Daniel Smith:
1816 died Blissville, NB 1

Looking for more information about Daniel Smith, Loyalist or Tory?

Search through millions of records to find out more.

Stories

Clapman Smith Solves Problem of Two Daniel Smiths

Sunbury, NB

Ad for Sale of Daniel Smith Property 1779
11 images

Early church records for Norwalk, CT were eaten by mice obscuring the fact that there were two Daniel Smiths in Norwalk during the mid 1700s.  Interestingly though both are descendants of Mathew Marvin--one of the first twelve settlers of Hartford, CT and an original proprietor in Farmington and in Norwalk. 

Daniel Smith, loyalist, was born in Norwalk, CT 1729-1736.  He married Ruth Fitch 1760 in New Canaan.  His daughter, Lydia, was baptised by the Anglican clergyman, Roger Viets, In New Preston in 1766. Connecticut Public records reveal this Daniel as a British  prisoner of the Continental General Putnam.  He was confined to "goal" in 1779 in Connecticut.

The other Daniel b.1731 was the son of Eliakim Smith from Hadley MA and Abigail Hoyt from Norwalk.   He was still living in Norwalk per 1790-1810 census and is the Daniel who married Eunice Green (widow) in 1778, parents to four daughters.  Eliakim Jr and brother, Daniel, lived on the west side of the Norwalk River.  West side Daniel served with the Revolutionary Forces in 1776.  He  appears in Connecticut Public Records multiple times as enlisted with the continental troops.  He also filed for losses to his Norwalk property in 1780, as a reseult of the damage done to Norwalk by British troops guided by loyalist Daniel. It is impossible, therefore, for West side Daniel to be considered as the Daniel who owned a public house in New Milford and who declared to be with the British in 1776.

"The American Genealogist" 1949 (volume 25 issue 2 page 82) states the parents of the  Daniel Smith who married Ruth Fitch were Elizabeth Clapham and Nehemiah Smith, son of Samuel.  Samuel was a very early settler in Norwalk and owned property on the East side of the river near Strawberry Hill.  He was involved in several undertaking with the Fitch family.  This Smith family was definitely the more prominent of the two Smith families in Norwalk history.  Donald Lines Jacobus is the author of the TAG article and probably the foremost genealogical authority on early Fairfield County Connecticut.

A confirmation of the parentage of this Daniel is his son named Clapman--a variation of Clapham.  (Clapham was often spelled Clapman in early Greenwich CT town records.) Fitch family tradition used the maternal maiden name as a son's given name. In most instances Clapman was the spelling of his given name in Canada, however, the following is one time at least when it was Clapham: m. Blissville, 9th inst., by same, John SEELY / Lydia SMITH youngest d/o Clapham SMITH. CG  (1834 article from the New Brunswick Courier, transcribed by Daniel Johnson).   

Letter reveals Daniel, son of Eliakim, in Norwalk

Norwalk, CT

1776 CT Revolutionary War Rolls
Letter from Eliakim Smith to Stephen W. and Martha(Smith) Johnson - 23 Nov 1811


Dear Brother and Sister- Through the goodness of God, I continue to this day and have health, but a great deal of infirmities, it is with difficulty that I write as my hand is full of rheumatics(sic) that I can scarce hold my pen or do any work: and so lame can but just go about. But why should I complain? I have exceeded the age of my parents. For about ten days I have had a dizziness in my head that gives me some ___, for by spells it seems as if my reason was going, now better. I have many such spells. My wife has her health and I cannot say how we should get along-was in hopes of seeing you again, but if you cannot come and see me, I never shall in this life, but must content myself with hearing. I wish you to write me when you can. Our brother DANIEL like me, worn out by time and hard labor was 80 years old 27th last September. If I live until Christmas I shall be 77 years old. I cannot write particulars, These (sic) you must ask of Josiah, the Bearer(sic). Wish you to give our respects to all your children. Mr. Muscraft (sic) and our friends. YOu wished the ages of our family, which I shall give follow.
This from your well wisher and brother. ELIAKIM SMITH

P.S. to Stephen W. Johnson and Martha 20th June 1812

The above was written to send by Josiah, but failed. There is no material alteration since except the dizziness in my head is gone. My hands were lame all winter, but this Spring they are better. I still have my health and have been to New York this spring to see mychildren there. You may ask Josiah more particulars
Wish you and all my friends all health - ELIAKIM SMITH

Ages of my family - ELiakim and Abigail Hoyt Smith
Our parents. ELIAKIM born January 23 1704 died February 17th 1777 aged 73 years 21 days
ABIGAIL his wife born Jan. 26th 1709 died Sept. 7th 1775 aged 66 years 7 m. 19 days
Their issue:
Martha born June 3rd 1728 married Eber'(sic) Nash
Daniel - died in infancy by accident
Daniel born Sept 25th 1731
Eliakim born Dec. 25th 1734
Hannah born Feb 28th 1737
Noah born Mar 7th 1739 (father of David Smith of Sausingburgh (sic) who was father of Charles D. Smith
Thankfull born May 15th 1745
Elizabeth born Feb 22nd 1747
Abigail born July 25th 1749
David died young
Nathan born Nov. 28th 1752 died in 1777 when came from York prison, taken at Ft. Washington
Martha born Apl 29th 1756
Catherine born Mar 12th 1762 narried Jonathan Thompson

My hand fails me, so I must leave the rest for you to ask of Josiah- wish you to write to me respecting you find your children, but should be very glad to see some of you at my house this summer. Come with Josiah as he goes out the River this season

Ancestors of Daniel Smith, Rebel or Patriot

Hadley, MA

1. Daniel Smith, born 25 Sep 1731 in Connecticut (Norwalk); died Bet. 1810 - 1820 in Norwalk, CT. He was the son of 2. Eliakim Smith and 3. Abigail Hoyt. He married (1) Widow Eunice Green Oct, 1788 in Norwalk, CT.

2. Eliakim Smith, born 13 Jan 1703/04 in Massachusetts (Hadley); died 1777 in Norwalk. He was the son of 4. Ebenezer Smith and 5. Abigail Bouton. He married 3. Abigail Hoyt Bef. 1631.

3. Abigail Hoyt, born 26 Jan 1708/09 in Connecticut (Norwalk); died 1765. She was the daughter of 6. Daniel Hayt and 7. Elizabeth Keeler.

4. Ebenezer Smith, born 1668 in Hadley, Massachusetts; died 1716 in Hadley, MA. He was the son of 8. Chileab Smith and 9. Hannah Hitchcock. He married 5. Abigail Bouton in prob. CT.

5. Abigail Bouton, born 1670 in Connecticut (Norwalk); died Unknown in Norwalk, CT. She was the daughter of 10. John Bouton and 11. Abigail Marvin.

6. Daniel Hayt, born 1681 in Connecticut (Norwalk); died Bet. 1756 - 1764 in Norwalk, CT. He was the son of 12. Zerubbabel Hoyt. He married 7. Elizabeth Keeler 1704 in Norwalk, CT.

7. Elizabeth Keeler, born 1679 in Connecticut (Norwalk); died 1747 in Norwalk, CT. She was the daughter of 14. John Keeler and 15. Sarah Beckwith??.

 8. Chileab Smith, born 1636 in Connecticut (Wethersfield); died 1731 in Hadley, MA. He was the son of 16. Samuel Smith and 17. Elizabeth Chileab. He married 9. Hannah Hitchcock 02 Oct 1661 in Hadley, MA.

9. Hannah Hitchcock, born 1645 in Connecticut (Wethersfield); died 1733 in Hadley, MA. She was the daughter of 18. Luke Hitchcock and 19. Elizabeth Gibbons.

 10. John Bouton, born 1636 in Connecticut; died 1707 in Norwalk, CT. He was the son of 20. John Bouton and 21. Alice Kellogg?. He married 11. Abigail Marvin 1656 in Norwalk, CT.

11. Abigail Marvin, born 1637 in Connecticut; died 1680 in Stamford, CT. She was the daughter of 22. Matthew Marvin and 23. Elizabeth.

 12. Zerubbabel Hoyt, born 1652 in Connecticut (Windsor); died 1738 in Norwalk, CT. He was the son of 24. Walter Hoyt and 25. Rhoda Tinker.

 14. John Keeler, born 1654 in Norwalk, CT; died 1719 in Fairfield, CT. He was the son of 28. Ralph Keeler. He married 15. Sarah Beckwith??.

15. Sarah Beckwith??, born 1657; died 1679 in Norwalk, CT.

 16. Samuel Smith, born 1601 in England (Hadleigh, Suffolk); died 1680 in Hadley, MA. He married 17. Elizabeth Chileab 1624 in St. Margaret's, Whatfield, Suffolk, Eng..

17. Elizabeth Chileab, born 1602 in England (Hadleigh, Suffolk); died 1686 in Hadley, MA.

 18. Luke Hitchcock, born Bet. 1614 - 1620 in England (Great Leighs); died 1659 in Wethersfield, CT. He married 19. Elizabeth Gibbons in England.

19. Elizabeth Gibbons, born 1618 in England (Fenny Compton); died 1696 in Springfield, MA.

20. John Bouton, born 1615 in England; died 1647 in Norwalk, CT. He married 21. Alice Kellogg? Bef. 1635 in England.

21. Alice Kellogg?, born 1610 in England; died 1681 in Norwalk, CT.

 Children of John Bouton and Alice Kellogg? are:

10 i. John Bouton, born 1636 in Connecticut; died 1707 in Norwalk, CT; married Abigail Marvin 1656 in Norwalk, CT.

ii. Bridget Bouton, born 1642 in Connecticut (Hartford); died 1689 in Norwalk, CT; married Daniel Kellogg 1655 in Norwalk, CT; born 1630 in England (Great Leighs); died 1688 in Norwalk, CT.

22. Matthew Marvin, born 1599 in England (Great Bentley); died 1679 in Norwalk, CT. He married 23. Elizabeth 1623 in England.

23. Elizabeth, born 1603 in England; died 1641 in Hartford, CT.

 Children of Matthew Marvin and Elizabeth are:

i. Mary Marvin, born 1628 in England (Great Bentley); died 1713 in Norwalk, CT; married Richard Bushnell 1648 in Hartford, CT; born Bet. 1623 - 1626 in England (Horsham, Sussex); died 1660 in Norwalk, CT.

11 ii. Abigail Marvin, born 1637 in Connecticut; died 1680 in Stamford, CT; married John Bouton 1656 in Norwalk, CT.

24. Walter Hoyt, born 1618 in England (Somerset); died 1699 in Norwalk, CT. He was the son of 48. Simon Hoyt and 49. Jane Stoodlie. He married 25. Rhoda Tinker 1652 in Windsor, CT.

25. Rhoda Tinker, born in England (Berkshire); died 1694 in Deerfield, MA. She was the daughter of 50. Robert Tinker and 51. Mary Merwin.

 28. Ralph Keeler, born 1613 in England (Lawford); died 1672 in Norwalk, CT.

 48. Simon Hoyt, born 1590 in England (Somerset); died 1657 in Stamford, CT. He married 49. Jane Stoodlie 1617 in Dorset, England.

49. Jane Stoodlie, born 1595 in England; died 1626 in England.

Child of Simon Hoyt and Jane Stoodlie is:

24 i. Walter Hoyt, born 1618 in England (Somerset); died 1699 in Norwalk, CT; married Rhoda Tinker 1652 in Windsor, CT.

 50. Robert Tinker, born in England; died in Engladn. He married 51. Mary Merwin.

51. Mary Merwin, born in England (Buckinghamshire); died Aft. 1648 in Windsor, CT.

 

Ancestors of Daniel Smith, Loyalist

Norwalk, CT

Original settlement of Hartford, CT 1645
4 images

 

1. Daniel Smith, born Abt. 1736 in Connecticut (Norwalk); died 1816 in Burton, Sunbury, NB. He was the son of 2. Nehemiah Smith and 3. Elizabeth Clapham. He married (1) Ruth Fitch 22 May 1760 in Norwalk, CT. She was born 1739 in Connecticut (Norwalk), and died in New Brunswick. She was the daughter of Theophilus Fitch and Lydia Kellogg.

2. Nehemiah Smith, born Abt. 1689 in Norwalk, Connecticut; died 1757 in Norwalk, Connecticut. He was the son of 4. Samuel Smith and 5. Rachel Marvin. He married 3. Elizabeth Clapham.

3. Elizabeth Clapham, born Abt. 1697 in Fairfield, Fairfield, CT; died Aft. 1757. She was the daughter of 6. Peter Clapham and 7. Rebecca Reynolds.

 Child of Nehemiah Smith and Elizabeth Clapham is:

1 i. Daniel Smith, born Abt. 1736 in Connecticut (Norwalk); died 1816 in Burton, Sunbury, NB; married Ruth Fitch 22 May 1760 in Norwalk, CT.

 4. Samuel Smith, born in Long Island, New York; died 1745 in Fairfield, Fairfield, CT. He was the son of 8. William Smith and 9. Magdelena. He married 5. Rachel Marvin.

5. Rachel Marvin, born 1649 in Norwalk, Connecticut. She was the daughter of 10. Matthew Marvin and 11. Alice Kellogg.

 Child of Samuel Smith and Rachel Marvin is:

2 i. Nehemiah Smith, born Abt. 1689 in Norwalk, Connecticut; died 1757 in Norwalk, Connecticut; married Elizabeth Clapham.

 6. Peter Clapham, died 1697 in Fairfield, Fairfield, CT. He married 7. Rebecca Reynolds Abt. 1694 in Fairfield, Connecticut.

7. Rebecca Reynolds, born 1659 in Greenwich, Connecticut; died 1730 in Fairfield, Fairfield, CT. She was the daughter of 14. Jonathan Reynolds and 15. Rebecca Huested.

 Child of Peter Clapham and Rebecca Reynolds is:

3 i. Elizabeth Clapham, born Abt. 1697 in Fairfield, Fairfield, CT; died Aft. 1757; married Nehemiah Smith.

 8. William Smith, born in 1598 in England; died Aft. 1664 in Jamaica, Long Island, New York. He married 9. Magdelena.

9. Magdelena, died Bef. 1684 in Long Island, NY.

 Child of William Smith and Magdelena is:

4 i. Samuel Smith, born in Long Island, New York; died 1745 in Fairfield, Fairfield, CT; married Rachel Marvin.

 10. Matthew Marvin, born 1599 in England (Great Bentley); died 1679 in Norwalk, CT. He married 11. Alice Kellogg.

11. Alice Kellogg, born 1610 in England; died 1681 in Norwalk, CT.

 Child of Matthew Marvin and Alice Kellogg is:

5 i. Rachel Marvin, born 1649 in Norwalk, Connecticut; married Samuel Smith.

 14. Jonathan Reynolds, born 1636 in Wethersfield, Connecticut; died 1673 in Greenwich, Connecticut. He was the son of 28. John Reynolds and 29. Sarah. He married 15. Rebecca Huested 1658.

15. Rebecca Huested, born Abt. 1641 in Greenwich, Connecticut; died in Greenwich, Connecticut. She was the daughter of 30. Angell Huested and 31. Rebecca Sherwood.

 Child of Jonathan Reynolds and Rebecca Huested is:

7 i. Rebecca Reynolds, born 1659 in Greenwich, Connecticut; died 1730 in Fairfield, Fairfield, CT; married Peter Clapham Abt. 1694 in Fairfield, Connecticut.

 28. John Reynolds, born 1612 in London, England; died 1662 in Stamford, Connecticut. He married 29. Sarah.

29. Sarah, born 1614 in England; died 1657 in Stamford, Connecticut.

 Child of John Reynolds and Sarah is:

14 i. Jonathan Reynolds, born 1636 in Wethersfield, Connecticut; died 1673 in Greenwich, Connecticut; married Rebecca Huested 1658.

30. Angell Huested, born 1620 in Somerset, England; died 1706 in Greenwich, CT. He was the son of Robert Husted and Elizabeth Miller. He married 31. Rebecca Sherwood.

31. Rebecca Sherwood, born 1625 in Ipswich, England; died 1704 in Greenwich, CT. She was the daughter of Thomas Sherwood and Alice Tiler.

 Child of Angell Huested and Rebecca Sherwood is:

15 i. Rebecca Huested, born Abt. 1641 in Greenwich, Connecticut; died in Greenwich, Connecticut; married Jonathan Reynolds 1658.

 

 

Loyalists Spring Fleet Much Like Pilgrims

St John, NB, Canada

From Connecticut's Loyalists (1974) by Robert A East, Professor of History at Brooklyn College and Executive Director of the Program for Loyalist Studies and Publications, sponsored jointly by the American Antiquarian Society, City University of New York, the University of London and the University of New Brunswick. 

An interesting piece of evidence about the character of some of these Connecticut settlers is found in a remarkable document, witnessed in April, 1783,  by Flyer Dibblee of Stamford, as "Deputy Agent.' This was a ship Manifest entitled it Return of the Families, etc., Embarked on Board the Union "Transport, Consett Wilson, Master, Began Huntington Bay April 11th, and Completed April 16,  1783.--'

The manifest refers to the embarkation of loyalists on the transport ship Union at Huntington, Long Island.   Arriving at New New York, where forty-three of the passengers disembarked on April 23, the Union left the following day for the St. John River region on the rugged Ray of Funday coast as part of the famous "Spring Fleet" It must have been something like that voyage of the Pilgrims on the Mayflower, one hundred and fifty years earlier.

A general disembarkation at the site of the future town of Saint John, at the mouth of the river, was subsequently made by ten vessels over a period of days. About as many vessels again arrived there on later occasions that year, and several transports had already departed (one party, of 300 as early as October, 1782) for other sites in Nova Scotia, such as at Port Roseway, Annapolis, and even Halifax. But the St. John River valley was recommended and was by far the place most frequently sought.

What is especially interesting about the first voyage of the Union, however (in addition to her original passenger list, to be discussed below), is that most of her passengers did not disembark at the mouth of the St. John River in May, 1783,but "remained comfortable on board ship.

Why did her passengers show so little enthusiasm for the original landing? What did they suppose was to be their ultimate destination? One can only note here that three of their number were sent farther up the river several days later to pick out a special site for settlement, one which proved to be the site of the future town of Kingston. 'The passengers on the Union were joined in their remarkable journey up the Belleisle by other passengers from the sister ship, the Hope (a vessel of 286 tons carrying 172 persons ), and also perhaps by some of the passengers aboard the larger ship, Aurora.

A clue to the reason for this remarkable searching out for a new site of settlement is suggested by the journey of the Hope, which, together with the Union, had also carried a number of Loyalists from the Lloyds Neck region at Huntington Bay to New York City in early April, but had retained them on board ship in the St. John River area until June 1.

In short, most of the passengers on board both the Union and the Hope appear to have originated in the Land of Steady Habits. "They were predominantly a Connecticut group who had been living together on Long Island; they had a strong sense of community. . . ."

"A strong sense of community," this probably could have been said about many other Loyalists from many other places. Whatever of special interest, or special pleading, or cowardice, or weakness that individual Loyalists may have been accused of from time to time, all Loyalists must have had a general sense of community with certain fellow Loyalists, whether they were from Connecticut, or Pennsylvania, or Georgia, or wherever. All must have remembered neighbors from home, in addition to whatever they all had in common in other respects.

Who were these passengers on the transport Union who had left Huntington Bay on April 16, 1783?

Out of 65 "signers" of this remarkable document (in addition to 35 women, 59 children over 10 years of age, 48 children under 10 years, and two servants), 35 are given as of Connecticut origin. This is over half the entire number. The list is worth recording:

Fyler Dibblee of Stamford (spelled "Stanford")
Walter Dibblee of Stamford
William Dibblee of Stamford
John Lyon of Redding
John Lyon, Jr, of Redding
Reuben Lyon of Redding
David Picket of Stamford
Ebenezer Deforest of Redding
Seth Squires of Stratford
Seth Squires, Jr., of Stratford
Abram Carrington of Milford
William Straight of Killingsworth
Seth Seely of Stamford
Seth Seely, Jr., of Stamford
Israel Hait of Norwalk
Widow Mary Raymond of Norwalk
Silas Raymond of Norwalk
James Picket of Norwalk
Louis Picket of Norwalk
Walter Bates of Stamford
John Gordon of Danbury
Joseph Lyon of "Connecticut"
Widow Hester Burlock of Norwalk
Stephen Fountain of Stamford
Abram Dickerson of New Haven
George Lumsden of New Haven
Elias Scribner of Norwalk
Hezekiah Scribner of Norwalk
Thaddeus Scribner of Norwalk
Joseph Ferris of Newtown
Solomon Tucker of Stamford
Daniel Smith of New Milford
Abel Bardsley of Fairfield
Ephraim Lane of Fairfield
John Marvin of Norwalk

It is interesting to note that slightly over half of the Connecticut signers are designated "farmers," although a small minority are called "shoemakers," and an even smaller minority, "carpenters." The Deputy Agent, Fyler Dibblee, apparently, was the only attorney-at-law aboard ship.

The overwhelming majority was, of course, from Fairfield County, and especially from the Town of Stamford.  Few of these signers could have been among those persons who disembarked at New York City in the early stage of the voyage. Almost without exception, they became permanent settlers in the new province to the north, and doubtless were among those who settled, first, at Kingston, or later up the river at Woodstock. King's County in New Brunswick was to become their territory.

The story of the Loyalists in Connecticut is thus intimately connected with the fortunes of those persons who had escaped to form communities in the Huntington and Port Jefferson areas on Long Island, or in New York City. These places on Long Island also became notorious as bases for an illicit "whale boat" trade with Connecticut in the dark of night; but primarily it was the traffic in people that gave them their reputation. Lloyd's Neck, on the eastern shore of Huntington Bay, was especially known as a place of refuge for persons who sought to escape from the vigilance of local committees of safety or inspection on the opposite shore.

 

Descendant of Clapman Smith, Benjamin Franklin Smith

New Brunswick

Clapman Smith, son of Daniel
7 images

He was the great, great grandson of loyalist, Daniel Smith. His descent is through  Clapman’s son, Benjamin, and through Benjamin’s son, George F. Smith. Benjamin Franklin Smith was a produce dealer and political figure in New Brunswick. He represented Carleton County in the Legislative Assembly of New Brunswick from 1903 to 1908, from 1915 to 1920 and from 1925 to 1930 as a Conservative member. Smith represented Victoria-Carleton in the Canadian House of Commons from 1930 to 1935 as a Conservative member and served in the Senate of Canada from 1935 to 1944.

He was born in Jacksonville, New Brunswick. Smith ran unsuccessfully for a federal seat in 1908, 1911 and 1921. He served in the province's Executive Council as Minister of Public Works from 1916 to 1917. Smith died in office at the age of 79. He is buried in the Baptist Cemetery in East Florenceville.

Thanks to Donna van Eeghen who brought this connection to my attention and provided the accompanying photos.

The Union

Long Island, NY

 [In an 1893 article about the history of New Brunswick, the arrival of The Union at Long Island and then New York to pick up evacuees and bring them to New Brunswick is described to represent that exodus.]  An excerpt from the Saint Croix Courier, St. Stephen, NB, April 27, 1893. The account given by Walter Bates doubtless very fairly illustrates the general mode of procedure in the emigration.

In this particular case the agent, Rev. John Sayre, came to announce to the Loyalists at Eaton’s Neck, Huntington, Lloyd’s Neck, and places in the vicinity on Long Island, that the king had granted to all Loyalists who did not incline to return to their homes and would go to Nova Scotia the privileges just mentioned. The ‘king’s offer’ was duly considered and gladly accepted. Then followed the hasty collection of such possessions as the unfortunate exiles had been able to preserve amid the wreck of their fortunes, and their embarkation in the transport Union, Capt. Consett Wilson. The vessel took in her complement of Loyalists at Huntington, Long Island. The embarkation began on Friday, April 11, and was completed on Wednesday following, in which time there were placed on board 209 souls, viz., 65 men, 35 women, 107 children and 2 servants. The deputy agent in charge was Fyler Dibblee, of Stamford, Conn., attorney-at-law.

The Union proceeded through East River to New York, the place of rendezvous. A week was consumed in getting together the transports, preparatory to setting sail, but at length, on Saturday, April 26, a fleet of upwards of twenty vessels under convoy set sail from Sandy Hook light, bound for ‘St. John’s river, Nova Scotia.’ This fleet sailed in company with a large number of transports bound for Shelburne and Halifax. The total number of passengers, including some troops, amounted to 7,000, with all their effects, also some artillery and public stores. According to Walter Bates, the Union was the best ship in the fleet. She proved her capacity as a fast sailer by leading the van for fourteen days and arriving at Partridge Island before the other vessels had come in sight. She was soon afterwards moored in the most convenient situation for landing, the place of anchorage being under the shelter of Fort Howe, opposite Navy Island, in sight of the position where once stood Fort la Tour. To the right lay the ‘upper cove,’ and beyond rose the rocky peninsula, named by the Indians Monneguash, now the site of a city of nearly 50,000 inhabitants, but then covered for the most part with scrubby pine, spruce and cedar-a rough and forbidding prospect indeed to eyes familiar with the fertile lowlands of Connecticut and New Jersey, and the undulating cultured fields of Long Island.

The 18th of May has been held sacred by the descendants of the founders of St. John as the day on which their Loyalist forefathers landed. Whether there was any formal or systematic act of landing is problematical. The Union, and the majority, if not all of the vessels of the fleet, must have arrived (according to Bates’s account) on the 10th of May. It had taken the Union more than five days to embark her contingent of refugees and their effects. It may therefore be taken for granted, as the facilities for landing were of the rudest description, that the work of getting upwards of 3000 people and their effects on shore was a work of several days. Moreover, there was no common mode of procedure employed. Walter Bates speaks of Capt. Wilson’s kindness in allowing his passengers to remain on board the Union whilst a deputation was employed in exploring for a proper place of settlement up the river, and contrasts their good fortune with that of others who were ‘precipitated on shore.’


Source

GLIMPSES OF THE PAST, Contributions to the History of Charlotte County and the Border Towns.
LXIV – THE UNITED EMPIRE LOYALISTS. [Rev. W. O. Raymond, M. A.]

Daniel Smith's sons, Orlo, Clapman, and Daniel jr.as well as the daughter Mary came to New Brunswick at some time but not on the ship Union--how could I find out how and when they arrived?

I have researched this question very thoroughly with no luck. I believe that is because very few ships' lists survive from the loyalists' arrival. I do believe the only way they could have arrived would have been by ship. It seems most likely that the family followed Daniel to LI when their property was seized in CT but I don't think any information exists to know any more than that. By checking marriage records and property deeds in NB for his sons you would at least learn their latest possible arrival date.

Thank you for your research and advise.The history of Daniel, the loyalist is amazing.He had 6 children, the son Clapman had 13 sons and 1 daughter. My grandfather and grandmother both are decendants of Clapman, thus Daniel.There are hundreds of decendants but prior to Daniel there was confusion which you have now settled for all time. It appears all researchers were in error. It appears William Smith came to the colonies from England--how can one find more information regarding his background.

"The American Genealogist" 1949 volume 25 issue 2 gives the lineage and some background on the William Smith family. It is available from the Allen County Library http://www.acpl.lib.in.us/genealogy/index.html for a small fee.

Ancestors of Daniel's Immigrant Ancestor, William Smith

Devon, England

Smith Ridge and Canoe Hill, New Canaan, CT Map
2 images

My research about William Smith, immigrant ancestor of Daniel Smith, loyalist found the following:

Source Bibliography: FARMER, JOHN. A Genealogical Register of the First Settlers of New-England; Containing an Alphabetical List of the Governours, Deputy-Governours, Assistants or Counsellors, and Ministers of the Gospel in the Several Colonies, from 1620 to 1692; Graduates of Harvard College to 1662; Members of the Ancient and Honourable Artillery Company to 1662; Freemen Admitted to the Massachusetts Colony from 1630 to 1662; With Many Other of the Early Inhabitants of New-England and Long-I  Page: 268  :William4, Barnard3, William2, Thomas1, Smith, William was born 25 Sep 1598 in Whitford, Devon, England and died before 1684 (1664) in Jamaica, Long Island, NY. William married (1) Marie Feavors 11 Aug 1625 in Colyton, Devon, England.  His home in England is based on the baptismal record of his  daughter, Hannah.


Directory of the first settlers of New England. Drake's additions and corrections (no. 1666) are found in the G.P.C. reprint and in no. 9151, Tepper, Passengers to America, pp. 468-470.   William Smith
                     Year: 1635 
                      Place: Weymouth, Massachusetts 
                      Primary Immigrant: Smith, William 

On Sept.2, 1635 William Smith became a freeman of Mass. In 1636 he was a representative of Weymouth and from 1638-43 a magistrate there. Also, at one time he was their commissioner to end small causes. From 1643-51 we find him at Rohoboth. He was active in town activities where he was choosen a townmen.Later he moved to Huntington, Long Island and on Jan.30, 1661 was an appraiser there and on Dec.2, 1661 a magistrate. In Jan. 1663/4 he was granted a house lot in Jamaica.   When and where he married Magdalena is not known.

  Other researchers have found the following lineage for William Smith, immigrant.  WILLIAM SMITH bapt. 25SEP1598 Whitford, Devonshire, ENG, d. before 1664 Jamaica, Long Island, NY, m. 1st 11AUG1625 Colyton, Devonshire, ENG MARIE FEAVORS (b. 29SEP1598 Colyton, Derbysshire, ENG,); m. 2nd MADGALENA (HILL?)

children: (1st marriage)

MARGRET SMITH bpt. 20AUG1626
THOMAS SMITH bpt. 36AUG1628 [sic], d. 1689
 HANNA SMITH b. 14MAY1632, m. 1655 JOHN CARPENTER
BENJAMIN SMITH b. 1632, d. 1713

children (2nd marriage)

1.JOSEPH SMITH b. 1637, d. 1732 Weymouth, Norfolk Co., MA         

2.RUTH SMITH b. 5NOV1639 Weymouth, Norfolk Co., MA, d. 20MAY1640 Weymouth, Norfolk Co., MA                                                                                                              

3.NEHEMIAH SMITH b. 2OCT1641 Weymouth, Norfolk Co., MA, d. after 1723 Jamaica, Long Island, NY                                                                                                                        

4.LYDIA SMITH b. 1643, MA, m. EDWARD HIGBY (A Edward Higby is also said* to have m. Jedidah Skidmore (b. ca. 1632) daughter of Thomas and Ellen Skidmore.)                    

5. WAIT SMITH b. ca. 1645 Weymouth, Norfolk Co., MA, d. 1709/14, m. 2nd PHEBE ASHMAN before 1667.                                                                                                   

6. SAMUEL SMITH b. ca. 1649, d. 1745 Norwalk, CT  married Rachel Marvin (Daniel, loyalist, grandparents.)

Wiiliam's (1598) father and mother:  BARNARD SMITH b. ca. 1571/2 Whitford, Devonshire, ENG, m. 30JAN1597/8 Whitford MARGRET ROWE (or RAWE) (b. ca. 1571, d. after 1614.)

William's (1598) paternal grandparents: WILLIAM SMITH b. ca. 1545, d. ca. 1587, m. ALICE (b. ca. 1545, d. ca. 1600)

William (1598) great grandfather : THOMAS SMITH b. ca. 1515 ENG, d. 3MAR1550, ENG.

About this Memorial Page

This page is locked. Want to contribute to this page? Contact mmpt39

Contributors:
mmpt39
Created:
Modified:
Page Views:
28,201 total (1,172 this week)

×