Summary

Conflict Period:
World War II 1
Branch:
Navy Reserve 2
Rank:
Lieutenant 1
Rank:
Lieutenant Commander 3
Birth:
05 Oct 1897 4
Winterset, Iowa 5
Death:
01 Jul 1978 6
Jul 1978 4
Menlo Park, CA 7
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Personal Details

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Full Name:
George Leslie Stout 5
Full Name:
George Stout 4
Birth:
05 Oct 1897 4
Winterset, Iowa 5
Death:
01 Jul 1978 5
Jul 1978 4
Menlo Park, CA 6
Residence:
Last Residence: Menlo Park, CA 4
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Marriage:
Margaret Hayes Stout 5
1924 5
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World War II 1

Branch:
Navy Reserve 2
Rank:
Lieutenant 1
Rank:
Lieutenant Commander 3
Awards:
Bronze Star; Army Commendation Medal 6
Unit:
Monuments, Fine Arts, and Archives section (1st US Army; 12th Army Group; Tokyo) 7

World War I 1

Branch:
Army 6
Rank:
Private 8
Unit:
Hospital unit 8
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Employment:
Employer: Fogg Art Museum (Harvard) 6
Position: Head of conservation 6
Place: Cambridge, MA 6
Start Date: 1933 6
End Date: 1947 6
Employment:
Employer: Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum 5
Position: Director 5
Place: Boston, Massachusetts 5
Start Date: 1955 5
End Date: 1970 5
Employment:
Employer: Worcester Art Museum 5
Position: Director 5
Place: Worcester, Massachusetts 5
Start Date: 1947 5
End Date: 1954 5
Education:
Institution: Harvard University 5
Place: Cambridge, Massachusetts 5
From: 1926 6
To: 1929 6
Education:
Institution: University of Iowa 5
Place: Iowa City, Iowa 5
To: 1921 6
Social Security:
Card Issued: California 4
Social Security Number: ***-**-1531 4

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Stories

Letter of recommendation

Excerpt from a letter of recommendation about George Stout from Dr. Paul Sachs (Fogg Museum of Art, Harvard) to Huntington Cairns, Secretary-Treasurer of the National Gallery of Art. September 9, 1943.

“Lieutenant George L. Stout (now stationed at Anacostia Field) is, on the technical side over a wide area, one of the best qualified men to deal with questions of safe guarding and restoration. He is, however, much more than this. He has always approached the problems from the point of view of their relation to general culture and is singularly clear-headed in his understanding of the relation of his special work to the broader problems of human civilization. In addition, he is a clear-headed organizer who has the power of attracting loyalty and devotion from those who work with him and has a clear eye for the selection of subordinates.

I can think of no man who would make a more efficient, more loyal head of any kind of conservation service in connection with the armed forces of the United States than would Lieutenant Stout [ . . . ]

[ . . . ] It may be well to mention that Lieutenant Stout has for many years past been closely in touch with European authorities on conservation in all its phases. He has attended European conferences where he has played a prominent part, and he is known and respected in many countries as a leading authority on the subject.”

(Source: http://www.fold3.com/image/270020773/)

Biography

After attending the University of Iowa and Harvard, Stout began working at Harvard’s Fogg Museum of Art. During World War II, he left the conservation department there to apply for active duty in the Navy (he had been in the Navy Reserves) and was eventually selected to join the Monuments, Fine Arts, and Archives section (MFAA) of the Army. This small group was in charge of protecting works of historical and cultural significance and returning art stolen by the Nazis. At first Stout worked in Europe, eventually becoming lieutenant commander in the MFAA and coordinating the rescue of tens of thousands of works of art. At the end of the war he went to Tokyo, where he served as chief of the MFAA there. Upon returning to the United States in 1946, Stout worked as director of the Worcester Art Museum and the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum until he retired in 1970. He received the Army Commendation Medal and Bronze Star for his work with the MFAA.

(Source: http://harvardmagazine.com/2010/01/monuments-men-rescuing-art-stolen-by-nazis)

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