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Benjamin Thomas, Carleton County Pioneer

(1763—1797)

Benjamin Thomas, son of Loyalist Richard and Hannah Glasier Thomas (1797-1885). New Brunswick, Canada

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Pictures & Records (45)

Benjamin thomas Property Carleton County
Benjamin thomas Property Carleton County
New Brunswick Property, at location of original grant 1821
Map Thomas grant 1829, Carleton County, New Brunswick
Map Thomas grant 1829, Carleton County, New Brunswick
Benjamin Thomas property in Rockland
Stephen Thomas, York County, New Brunswick
Stephen Thomas, York County, New Brunswick
Land petiton of Stephen Thomas-1827
James Thomas 1859 petition for land
James Thomas 1859 petition for land
Sales of Stephen Thomas Land to James Thomas--witness Benjamin Thomas
Early Settlers at Becagumic, NB 1826
Early Settlers at Becagumic, NB 1826
A reprint from We Lived (A GENEALOGICAL NEWSLETTER OF NEW BRUNSWICK SOURCES published by Cleadie B. Barnett)
Benjamin Thomas, 2nd marriage to Sophia Tracy
Benjamin Thomas, 2nd marriage to Sophia Tracy
Stephen Thomas and Elizabeth Clarke, New Brunswick
Stephen Thomas and Elizabeth Clarke, New Brunswick
Benjamain Thomas, witness to their marriage 1830
James Thomas & Jane Kermott
James Thomas & Jane Kermott
New Brunswick marriage records
Hannah Thomas & Stillman Stone
Hannah Thomas & Stillman Stone
marriage--Acadia French Catholic Church Records 1670-1946
Sarah Thomas Robinson and John Dickinson  marriage
Sarah Thomas Robinson and John Dickinson marriage
Acadia French Catholic Church Records 1670-1946
Elizabeth Thomas & Darius Dickinson  marriage
Elizabeth Thomas & Darius Dickinson marriage
Acadia French Catholic Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1670-1946
GLASIER MAP.JPG
GLASIER MAP.JPG
Location of Glasier land on the River St. John, Sunbury, New Brunswick
William Henry Thomas
William Henry Thomas
William Henry Thomas Chicago 1885
Wallace Henry Thomas
Wallace Henry Thomas
Wallace Henry thomas
bmt.jpg
bmt.jpg
Benjamin Marshall Thomas
caroline clarke
caroline clarke
Caroline Clarke Thomas wife of William Henry Thomas, born Heavitree, Devonshire, 1839
David Randolph Thomas
David Randolph Thomas
David Randolph Thomas--prominent Chicago Attorney born Onario, Canada died 1918 Chicago
 Ruth Adeline Thomas Gaines
Ruth Adeline Thomas Gaines
Ruth Adeline Thomas Gaines
John Howard Thomas
John Howard Thomas
John Howard Thomas, son William Henry and Caroline thomas
Benjamin_Thomas.jpg
Benjamin_Thomas.jpg
Benjamin Marshall Thomas obituary
alicelupton_jpg.jpg
alicelupton_jpg.jpg
Alice Ethel Lupton Thomas
Blissville, Sunbury, New Brunswick  original grants
Blissville, Sunbury, New Brunswick original grants
Joshua and Richard Thomas property at red dot--Blissville, NB
Blissville, Sunbury, NB land grants
Blissville, Sunbury, NB land grants
Original land grants
Daniel Smith petition for Land in New Brunswick
Daniel Smith petition for Land in New Brunswick
pg1
Daniel Smith petition for Land in New Brunswick
Daniel Smith petition for Land in New Brunswick
pg2
 Daniel Smith petition for Land in New Brunswick
Daniel Smith petition for Land in New Brunswick
pg3
Ad for Sale of Daniel Smith Property 1779
Ad for Sale of Daniel Smith Property 1779
From Connecticut Courant
Daniel Smith, New Preston.png
Daniel Smith, New Preston.png
Baptism Lydia Smith, daughter Daniel and Ruth, from the records of Rev. Roger Viets, Simsbury, CT, St. Andrews Church
William Butler Thomas, letter to cousin, David Randolph Thomas
William Butler Thomas, letter to cousin, David Randolph Thomas
Son of David Randolph Thomas, grandson of Benjamin and Mary Ann Hayward Thomas, great grandson of Richard and Hannah Glasier Thomas
William Butler Thomas, obituary LA Times
William Butler Thomas, obituary LA Times
Son of David Randolph Thomas, grandson of Benjamin and Mary Ann Hayward Thomas, great grandson of Richard and Hannah Glasier Thomas
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Stories

Son of loyalists in Carleton County, NB

Carleton county, NB, CA

Benjamin thomas Property Carleton County
23 images

Benjamin Thomas (Richard4, Joshua3, Richard2, Evan1)  was born Bet. 1797 - 1798 in Canada (Lincoln, Sunbury, New Brunswick), and died 28 Jul 1885 in Carleton County, New Brunswick. His grandparents were Joshua and Martha Thomas, loyalists from the Blue Mountains of Pennsylvania, who settled in Burton, Sunbury, NB in 1783.  His parents were Richard and Hannah Glasier Thomas. 

Benjamin's maternal grandfather, Lieutenant Benjamin Glasier, fought in the French and Indian Wars, having been held captive at Fort William Henry, NY for an extended length of time.  He arrived on the River St. Johns prior to the loyalists.  He was a lumberman, cordwainer, soldier and a blackmith.  At Gouldsborough, Maine he was one of the petitioners against the embargo of July 1 1775.

 Benjamin Thomas married Mary Ann Hayward 24 Jul 1819 in Lincoln, Sunbury, New Brunswick, daughter of George Hayward and Mary Smith. She was born 1799 in Canada (Lincoln, Sunbury, New Brunswick), and died Bef. 1851 in Brighton, Carleton, NB. Her maternal grandparents were Connecticut loyalists, Daniel Smith and Ruth Fitch.  The Daniel Smiths (Burton--1783) and the George Haywards (Lincoln--1763) were early settlers in Sunbury County. Her parental grandparent's George and Ann Derley Hayward came from England to from was then Nova Scotia in 1763.  Today the area they settled is in Lincoln, Sunbury, NB.

Benjamin's siblings were Elizabeth Thomas Dickinson (Darius), Rebecca Thomas Sewell (Nicholas) (removed to Maine), Ann Thomas Sewell (William), Sarah Thomas Robinson Dickinson (John Duncan), Hannah Thomas Stone (Stillman)(removed to Maine), Stephen and James, both early settlers in Carleton County. George Thomas who married Mary Crandlemire (removed to Michigan) is also quite likely a brother.  All were born in Sunbury County, NB. Some of them returned to the United States in the 1800's, as did many of his children.

In 1821 & 1827, Benjamin petitioned for land in Carleton County. He located there about 1821. In 1821 he described himself as married with a female child. In 1827 his petition stated he had three children. The family lived in what was to become Rockland, near his brothers, Stephen and James. He was a farmer and a Free Will Baptist.

In 1837 he sold the property that he acquired in 1827 to brother-in-law, Samuel Estabrooks, removing to land that was originally Stephen Thomas'. Stephen appears to have died by this time. He lived with his daughter, Caroline Noble, in 1861. By 1871 he had returned to Stephen's land and lived near his brother,  James. He will die on this property.

WOODSTOCK SENTINEL 1885: Hartland (Carleton Co.) 28th Aug., Benjamin THOMAS, age 88. Deceased was one of the first settlers of Becaguimec Settlement, having lived at the above place nearly 60 years, raising a large family of whom 4 sons and 4 daughters survive him. D.R. THOMAS and J.H. THOMAS, two of the above, reside in California.

September 14, 1885 Saint John The Daily Telegraph d. Hartland (Carleton Co.) 28th ult., Benjamin THOMAS, age 88. Deceased was one of the first settlers of Becaguimec Settlement having lived in the above place nearly 60 years.

Children of Benjamin Thomas and Mary Hayward were:

Ruth Thomas, born 1834 in Brighton, Carleton, New Brunswick. Died in Boston, MA

John Hiram Thomas, born 1838 in Brighton, Carleton, New Brunswick; died Aft. 1921 in Oakland, CA.

Mary Ann Thomas, born 1824 in Brighton, Carleton, New Brunswick.

George Hayward Thomas, born 1827 in Brighton, Carleton, New Brunswick. Died in probably Maine.

Emmaline Isabella Thomas, born 1837 in Brighton, Carleton, New Brunswick.

Frederick Thomas, born 1842 in Brighton, Carleton, New Brunswick.

Jane Thomas, born 1830 in Brighton, Carleton, New Brunswick.

William Henry Thomas, born 1830 in Canada (Brighton, Carleton, New Brunswick); died 1914 in Chicago, IL.

David R Thomas, born 1833 in Brighton, Carleton, New Brunswick; died 1897 in Martinez, CA.

Caroline Thomas, born 1824 in Brighton, Carleton, New Brunswick. She removed to Maine during the 1860's  Married Isaacher Noble..

Adeline Thomas, born 1843 in Brighton, Carleton, New Brunswick.

Benjamin Glasier at Fort William Henry

New York

GLASIER MAP.JPG

From  The History of Central New Brunswick by L.M B. Maxwell
 "There was Capt. Benjamin Glasier that was in New Brunswick which at one time Maine was part of that territory. Capt Benjamin Glasier this is what it saids in a book (from Reminiscences of Thomas Glasier) Thomas Glasier was a grandson of Capt. Benj. Glasier and Benjamin was stationed at fort william nry when it was besieged by the French and Indians. They held out for weeks but hunger drove them to surrender at last, the supplies they expectd from Halifax did not come. the French commander let them go safely to their homes, so they laid down there arms and marched out accompanied by the women and children who were in the fort for protection. The Indians attacked them as they were making their way to safety and brutally murdering them they dashed the children against the trees and ill treated and sclaped the men and women. Grandfather went off by himself and was near safety when a savage jumped from behind a tree and grabbed him. Grandfather who was a strong man, wrestled with the Indian and wrenched the Tommy hawk from his belt and jerked it up to kill the Indian , another Indian seized him from behind and overpowered him bound him and led him to their canoes. He found a gread many others from the fort also prisoners , amongst them was the old commander of the fort also prisoners . They scapled Grandfather. Grandfather said the indians killed others at houses they would come to kiling men and women and children, and burning there houses. 

They held him prisoner for 9 months In Quebec they hand him over to a prison there. He was there some months and he was redeemed by his brother Capt. Beamsley glasier who had come to make a exchange of prisoners. He made his way home to Newbury Port and then to St. John, N.B. He and his other brother Steven (steven Glasier's house is still standing) In the lower Lincoln. helped Hazen & white and Peabody fill a contract with the English Goverment for masts and then they started ship building. Benjamins sons, Senator John and Stephen became the first great lumbermaen on the St. John River an at one time employed 600 men. They were the first to bring lumber over the Grand Falls.

Capt Glasier was a lumberman, cordwainer, soldier and a Blackmith. At Gouldsborough, Maine was one of the petitioners against the embargo of July 1 1775. In 1779 he Removed to Nova Scotia, now New Brunswick.   In 1782 he Purchased 1000 acres of land 8 miles below St. Anne's Point, now Lincoln, from Benjamin Bubar (Bubier) for 200 Pounds.

He was omitted from the Studholme Report. In 1793 he was a resident of Maugerville, NB
His will dated April 11th 1806, proved April 16, 1814. No. 39. He was an Anglican.

Marriage Notes for Benjamin 4Glasier, Lt and Marcy/Massa Downs: Married in the home of John Hanson in Gouldsborough.

Father: Stephen Glasier b: ABT 1687 in Massachusetts (Newberry)
Mother: Sarah Pike b: 1706 in New Hampshire (Salisbury)

Marriage 1 MarcyMercy Downs b: 1750 in Maine

  • Married: 1770 in Goldsbourgh, ME

Daniel Smith, Connecticut Tory or Loyalist

Connecticut and New Brunswick

Blissville, Sunbury, New Brunswick  original grants
7 images

Daniel Smith c 1736 in Norwalk Connecticut and died 1816 in Burton, Sunbury.  He was the youngest son of Nehemiah and Elizabeth Clapham Smith. He married Ruth Fitch, 22 May 1760 in New Canaan, CT, daughter of Theophilus Fitch and Lydia Kellogg. She was born 1739 in Norwalk and died in Burton. 

Royal Gazette 1816:  SMITH, Daniel  Parish of Burton, Sunbury County. Intestate. Administration granted 29 June to Clapman SMITH, Orlo SMITH and Daniel SMITH.

There were two Daniel Smiths in Norwalk during the mid 18th century. Several researchers report the Daniel, son Eliakim and Abigail Hoyt, as the Daniel who was a loyalist.  However, I have not found any documentary evidence to support this. Vol 25 issue 2 of The American Genealogist states his lineage as that of Nehemiah Smith, son of Samuel, and Elizabeth Clapham, daughter of Peter Clapham and Rebecca.    Daniel's son named Clapman is so similar to Clapham that it gives confirmation to this lineage.

In the marriage record for Daniel Smith and Ruth Fitch, Daniel is referred to as of Norwalk. Later he owned property in New Milford and ran a public house there at the start of the American Revolution. See his claim for land in NB that is attached.  His daughter Lydia was baptised in 1766 in New Preston by the Rev. Roger Viets, St. andrews Chruch, Simsbury, CT.See attached from Rev. Viets records. This indicates Daniel was an Episcopalian and that could be the source of his loyalty to the crown.

 Josiah  Starr petitioned that Daniel's property in New Milford be seized to pay wages of the men under his command.  By a court decision of June 1781 this was done.  Daniel Smith was captured, escaped and helped bring other Tory families through the lines. He sailed on the Union from New York in the spring of 1783 to what is now New Brunswick, Canada in 1783. He brought two slaves with him and granted them their freedom, but they stayed with his family for the rest of their lives. His claim for compensation of his losses in New Milford was accepted by the British Commission of Inquiry and he and his sons, Orlo, Clapman and Daniel Jr. were granted land along the South West Branch of the Oromocto River in New Brunswick near the town of Blissville.

The Union was part of the "Spring Fleet" and departed from Huntington Bay on April 16th 1783 with the "Kingston Loyalists" and proceeded to New York, where forty-three of the passengers disembarked on April 23rd. The Union sailed for New Brunswick on April 24th with the remaining one hundred and sixty-four passengers. The Union arrived at Partridge Island, NB on May 10th, and was moored at St. John on May 11th. The passengers did not land immediately, but "remained comfortable on board ship" until June 4th 1783.

Return of the Famelies, &c., Embark'd on board the Union Transport, Consett Wilson, Master, began Huntington Bay April 11th, & Compleated April 16th, 1783: Daniel Smith, Nw. Milford, Connecticut, Farmer .  Daniel appears alone on the return, so his family must have come later.  Robert A East, in Connecticut's Loyalists  describes the Spring Fleet arrivals as being very similar to the Pilgrims on the Mayflower.

From New Brunswick Land records: Smith, Daniel 1789 Daniel Smith, asks for 500 acres on Oromocto. (HIS PROPERTY WAS JUST WEST OF THOMAS PROPERTY ON ACCOMPANNYING MAP)

Child of Daniel Smith and Ruth Fitch is: Mary Smith, born in Connecticut (New Milford); died 1811 in Lincoln, Sunbury, New Brunswick.

Daniel's daughter, Mary Smith,  was born in Connecticut (New Milford), and died 1811 in Lincoln, Sunbury, New Brunswick. She married George Hayward, son of George Hayward and Ann Durley. He was born 1768 in Sunbury County New Brunswick, and died 05 Dec 1828 in Lincoln, Sunbury, New Brunswick.

From Some Descendants of George Hayward and Ann Durley by George H. Hayward:  George  may have left NB in 1823, some of his land was sold at that time. He probably returned before his death as his estate was inventoried and probated in NB. He owned 1 stove and pipe, 1 bedstead and carpet, 1 tender, 1 pr. stillery, 1 pr. tongs, slae harness, 1 bed, s blankets, 1 sheet, 2 pillows, 1 coverlet, coat, vest, coat, trousers, cloake, 2 window curtains, 1 pr bed curtains, 2 tea boards, dishes trunk, 1 pr. candlesticks, 1 hat, 1 axe, 1 shovel, 1 sled, old iron metal chest, 1 pr. andirons, 1 table, 1 slae, seventeen harrow teeth, 1 chair, 1 bake pan, 1 tea cannister, 2 pewter dishes, 1 sheet, quilt, 1 pr. hames, brass chains, 1 decanter, 1 watch, and seals 1 lot lands, house barns, 10 acres, 1 horse. The value was 288 pounds.

George attended the Anglican Church in Maugerville,   probably livimg in Lincoln most of his adult life. Child of Mary Smith and George Hayward is: Mary Ann Hayward, born 1799 in Lincoln, Sunbury, New Brunswick; died Bef. 1851 in Brighton, Carleton, NB. She married Benjamin Thomas 24 Jul 1819 in Lincoln, Sunbury, New Brunswick; born Bet. 1797 - 1798 in  Sunbury, New Brunswick; died 28 Jul 1885 in Carleton County, New Brunswick

 

William Henry Thomas, loyalists' descendant returns to States

Chicago, IL

William Henry Thomas
10 images

William Henry6 Thomas (Benjamin5, Richard4, Joshua3, Richard2, Evan1) was born 1830 in Canada (Brighton, Carleton, New Brunswick), and died 1914 in Chicago, IL. He married Caroline M. Clarke 07 Jul 1858 in St. James Anglican Cathedral, Toronto, Canada, daughter of William Clarke and Anne Marshall. She was born 1839 in England (Heavitree, Exeter, Devonshire), and died 1908 in Chicago, IL.

Born in New Brunswick, he appears in the 1851 Brighton Parish Census as the child of Benjamin Thomas. He moved to Barrie, Ontario between 1851 and 1861, probably in going first to Toronto, Ontario where he met Caroline.  There is a William Thomas living very near the Clarke family on Park Lane in 1856. He immigrated to Chicago about 1876, little less than a century after his loyalist ancestors had fled NY.  In 1900, the family lived at 59 University Place. This was the site of the originial University of Chicago. All their Chicago homes were within a few blocks of each other.

In the Barrie 1871 census, the record for the William Thomas family includes the following:

William Thomas 36 NB W. Meth. , Caroline 29 , William 10, Bella 12, Mary 9,

Randolph 7, Hiram 5 and Caroline

On the 1880 United States Census his occupation is distributor and date of immigration, 1876. The children were : Isabella 19,  William F. 17, Mary Ann 15, David Randolph 13, Carrie 10, Benjamin Marshall 8,  John Howard 5, Wallace Henry 3, and Ruth Adeline 1.   The family was living in LaGrange Park.

A son George Garfield was born in 1881--per 1900 US Census. He died in 1944. Son, William F., died in 1908, D.R. in 1918, and Wallace Henry in 1893. Hiram had died by 1880.

The following articles from the Chicago Tribune give some picture of the man and his sons. However, these stories must be placed in the context of Chicago in the 1890's. A boom town. The one thing that cannot be denied is that W.H. Thomas had a very strong constitution.

Chicago Tribune 1891

HIGH RATE OF INTEREST.

In a Circuit Court bill Willaim H. and William F. Thomas allege they lost Many thousands of dollars by doing business with the Chicago Trust and Savings Bank, The Midland Co. and Daniel H. Tolman. They tell a story of usurious interest at the rate of 2 1/2 percent per mouth until the interest became the principal.

A loan of $2650, one for $5,500 and others for $700 and $400 grew into mountains and Were soon lost among the interest and collateral securities. For instance, a trust deed involving prop. worth $2500 was given to back-up the loans, amounting to less than $5,000, and now the complainants find it hard Work to get the property back.

Chicago Tribune 1893

The Chicago Trust and Savings Bank to be a usurer yesterday by Judge Tuley. The decree was entered on a suit brought by William H. and William F. Thomas, the Midland company, Daniel H. Tolman

president of both concerns and several officers of the bank. The complaints allege that they Had borrowed $6375 on which usurious interest was Charged.

The firm of W.H. Thomas & Son won the suit which had been pending for sometime.

 

FELLED BY SAVAGE BLOW

Chicago Tribune, Sept. 2, 1896

W. H. Thomas HIT ON THE HEAD WITH LEAD PIPE AND BEATEN,

C. H. Davis and a Companion Sought After by the Police on a Charge That They Assaulted the Old Man in His Calumet Area Flats-He Refuses to Pay a Plumber's Bill. They Came to Collect-Victim May Not Recover.

William H. Thomas a South Side property owner with a real estate office in the Title and Trust Building, is confined at his home,

No, 59 University place, Is in critical condition as a result of a terrible blow an the head with a piece of lead pipe And a beating he received Yesterday morning at tare hands of two young plumbers. His assailants called at Mr. Thomas' flat buildings Nos 1927 and 1928 Calumet Avenue, to collect a plumbing bill, which amounted to $17.

Mr: Thomas, who is 70 years of age may not recover from his injuries.

According to the story told by neighbors living in Calumet avenue to police at the Cottage Grove Avenue Station,the aged Mr. Thomas was looking around his flat buildings to see What repairs were needed when Charles Davis, a collector in the employ of Plumber John W Trembley of 23rd St and Cottage Grove Ave, accompanied by another *young man, walked into the flat building and asked the feeble owner if he was ready to settle the little Plumbing bill.

' No:- replied Mr. Thomas,somewhat angrily, " I think the bill exorbitant, but, if you call at my office, I believe we can adjust Matters amicably."

`• That won't do," exclaimed bill collector. We want the money right now.

Well you can't get It," was the answer.

We'll get it now or we will kill You."

To avoid trouble Mr. Thomas started to walk away.}_ Before he had taken two steps, so the police report puts forth, the collector struck the aged man over the head with a long, heavy piece of lead pipe.

Mr. Thomas was knocked insensible, and, it is alleged, while he was lying on the floor In the hallway Davis and his companion kicked him several times in the head and body.

After the assault both assailants ran away so far have succeeded in eluding police.

Last night and all of yesterday afternoon Lieut. Thomas had a number of his detectives scouring the South Side for the men, but as of2:30 am. neither of them had been arrested.

Dr. A. H Bird, who was called to attend Mr. Thomas, found an ugly gash two two inches over the right eye, which extended to the bone, contusions on the head and body, and two broken ribs. The doctor also stated that the patient had received Internal Injuries, and that all his hurts, coupled with the man's advanced age and feeble condition, might prove fata

Mr. Thomas was conveyed to his home in the police ambulance from the Cottage Grove Avenue Station.

Mr. Thomas' son, D. R. Thomas, is a member of the Chicago Athletic Club, and a lawyer with an office in the Unity Building. Mr. Thomas who was assaulted has been a resident of Chicago for thirty years and is the owner of over $100,000. worth of property In the vicinity of Nineteenth street and Cottage Grove avenue.

Sept. 3 1896, Chicago Tribune

H, C. Davis, collector for Plumber J. Trembley, No. 22 Cottage Grove avenue, is still at large, despite his assault upon W.H. Thomas. a real estate man.

More than that, Mr. Davis was much sought yesterday by those whom a common bond had made wondrous kind, the callers being those who asserted that their charts to collect debts from the victim of the assault had resulted to their physical detriment,Mr. Davis was not, however, in the language of the street, "comeatable," although he was entirely willing to be located by the police. This willingness was based, it was stated, upon a desire to have Mr. Thomas or the Messrs. Thomas, the three husky sons of the first-named, place their grievances upon record, is order that a public answer might be made.

As a matter of precaution, Mr. Davis quietly went before Justice George Ford, pleaded guilty to assault and battery, and paid the fine and costs. Then he adjourned to await developments, which it seems, have not developed.

The whole story, as told, Is this:

Mr. Thomas has three sons. They are D. R. Thomas, a lawyer,, who weighs 250 pounds: Will F. Thomas, a less mighty man, but by no means a weakling; and Ben M. Thomas, who was has the reputation of being a "good man."

A great number of the small merchants in the neighborhood of Mr. Thomas' home, No. 59 University place, say they have had dealings with father and sons.

Among these is J. 0. Samkins, a plumber, at Wabash avenue and Twentieth streets He says he went to Mr. Thomas' office, which was then at No. 119 Dearborn street, and asked the payment of a bill. He says that through the Intervention of the sons he escaped only with a pair of black eyes and numerous bruises.

Another plumber,, with a similar story, is P. J. Kinney, whose shop is in Twenty-second street, near Cottage Grove avenue.

Abner Price, a mason contractor, says his son was assaulted because he attempted to collects bill.

W. Hanson, a carpenter, in Twenty-second street, near Prairie avenue, Is one of others who detail experiences with the Thomases similar to those described.

The elder Thomas could not be seen yesterday.

Benjamin and Thomas and William F. Thomas not only deny the allegations, but declare that they never before heard either of J. O, Samkins, P. J. Kinney, Abner Price, or W. H. Hanson.

However, it is asserted that one of the Thomas sons called on Mr. Samkins yesterday for the purpose of paying the claim

for presenting which Mr. Samkins says he was beaten.

Chicago Tribune October 6, 1898 FENDER RUNS DOWN LAWYER W. H. THOMAS.Aged Attorney Struck While Crossing La Salle Street-is crushed Under the Car-Badly Hurt, but Will Recover.

Attorney W. H. Thomas of 57 University place was run down by a grip car at Randolph and La Salle streets at 2 o'clock yesterday afternoon. His Injuries are serious, but It Is thought he will recover. The car fender was antiquated and useless. The lawyer, who is 67 years old, was crossing La Salle street with his sons. Attorneys D. R.and Benjamin Thomas, when the accident occurred. A wagon stopped them for a moment, and when it passed Mr. Thomas started ahead. He did not see a Lincoln avenue grip car which had just left the tunnel, and was run down.

Mr. Thomas was dragged nearly 100 feet before the car was stopped and when his sons reached him he was unconscious. Part of his body was under the front of the car, which had to be shoved back before he could be taken out. A physician who attended him said that two ribs and his right arm were broken. He was taken home in an ambulance.

Mr. Thomas has been a resident of Chicago twenty years. With his sons he has offices In the Unity Building.

 

Chicago Tribune (IL) - May 10, 1914

THOMAS

Deceased Name: William H. Thomas

William H. Thomas, aged 85 years, father of David R., Benjamin M., John H., George G., Isabella B., Mary A., Caroline M., and Ms. H. W. Gaines. Funeral Sunday, May 10, at 2 o'clock, from his late residence, 3254 Groveland ave. Interment, Oakwoods cemetery.

 Caroline M. Clarke: Her birth is registered in St. Thomas Parish--1839 Oct.-Dec. William and Caroline were married in Toronto in 1858. The transcription of the original record indicated that she was 19. The witnesses were Stephen Ricketts and father, Wm. Clarke, both of Toronto. She was named after William's sister, Caroline.

She appeared in The Tribune as being active in real estate with William. She died from utuerine cancer at 3234 Groveland. Her children were listed as Wiiliam F., David R., Benjamin M., John Howard, George G., Isabella R., Mary A. and Mrs. H.W. Gaines.

Children of William Thomas and Caroline Clarke are:  John Howard Thomas.    Ruth Thomas.  (Mrs. H.W. Gaines)   Isabella Thomas.  Wallace Henry Thomas. George Garfield Thomas.  Mary Ann Thomas.  William F. Thomas.  Caroline Thomas.  Benjamin Marshall Thomas and David Randolph Thomas.

Benjamin Marshall Thomas, born 1873 in Canada (Barrie, Ontario); died 24 Jun 1927 in Chicago, IL.   Benjamin Marshall7 Thomas (William Henry6, Benjamin5, Richard4, Joshua3, Richard2, Evan1) was born 1873 in Canada (Barrie, Ontario), and died 24 Jun 1927 in Chicago, IL. He married Alice Ethel Lupton 1898 in prob. Chicago, daughter of John Lupton and Anna Pillar. She was born 1873 in Canada (Montreal, Quebec), and died 1909 in Chicago, IL.

.  David Randolph Thomas married Queen Vernon Gridley daughter of William Seward Gridley and Eleanor Caroline Gridley.  Their daughter, Goldie, was very a proud member of several Daughters of the American Revolution chapters.  One can't help but wonder if she even knew that her Thomas loyalist heritage was just as strong.   Born Golden Caroline Thomas she married Frank Wright.  Both her mother and father were descended from original settlers of Farmington CT and were connected through the descendants of Richard Seymour.

 

Pre-Loyalist George Hayward

New Brunswick, Canada

GEORGE & ANN  DURLEY HAYWARD Grave
10 images

 

 He probably was induced to cross the Atlantic with his young family by offer of land from the British government, who was very anxious to populate this previously French occupied territory with English speaking settlers. His petition for land states that he came from Great Britain with his family in 1763. He settled on lot #70. In 1770, he moved across the river to Lincoln. The Lower Lincoln Cemetry in Lincoln, NB, is situated on land where George Hayward’s grandson once lived. It is possible that this was where he and Ann also lived.   He was engaged in lumbering and owned several pieces of property in Sunbury County.  The inventory of his estate at the time of his death was £314.

He probably was induced to cross the Atlantic with his young family by offer of land from the British government, who was very anxious to populate this previously French occupied territory with English speaking settlers. His petition for land states that he came from Great Britain with his family in 1763. He settled on lot #70. In 1770, he moved across the river to Lincoln. The Lower Lincoln Cemetry in Lincoln, NB, is situated on land where George Hayward’s grandson once lived. It is possible that this was where he and Ann also lived.   He was engaged in lumbering and owned several pieces of property in Sunbury County.  The inventory of his estate at the time of his death was £314.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Caroline Clarke's Ancestors

England

Golden Caroline Thomas Wright.jpg
5 images

ANCESTORS OF WILLIAM CLARKE--FATHER

 1. Samuell1 Clarke He married Joan Quick 1705 in Clyst Honiton, Devon, England, daughter of Thomas Quick. She was born 1684 in Broad Clyst, Devon, England. 

2.Samuell2Clarke was born 1711 in Clyst Honiton, Devon, England. He married Mary.

 3. Richard3 Clarke (Samuell2, Samuell1) was born 1736 in Clyst Honiton, Devon, England, and died 1820 in Clyst Honiton, Devon, England. He married Grace Edmunds 1756 in Colyton Raleigh, Devon, England. She was born in England, and died Bef. 1813 in England.

 4. Joseph4 Clarke (Richard3, Samuell2, Samuell1) was born 1778 in Clyst Honiton, Devon, England, and died 1825 in Clyst St Mary, Devon, England. He married Jane Easton 1800 in Clyst St. Mary, Devon, Enlgand, daughter of William Easton and Jane Skinner. She was born 1774 in Broad Clyst, Devon, England, and died 1840 in St Thomas District, Devon, England.

 Joseph was a shoemaker. the children were William, James, John, Charles, Richard, Phillip and Caroline Louisa. Caroline is living with her uncle, John, in 1841 and on the 1851 census she is in the Lambert Workhouse in Surrey--listed as a dressmaker.

 5. William5 Clarke (Joseph4, Richard3, Samuell2, Samuell1) was born Abt. 1801 in Sowton, Devonshire, England, and died in Probably Toronto, Canada. He married Anne Marshall 1829 in St Marleybone, London, England, daughter of John Marshall and Isabella Shadoway. She was born 1801 in Edinburgh, Scotland, and died in Ontario, Canada. in 1885. Anne probably came to England as a servant. She probably was working in London and met William while was driving a hackney coach in London.

 In 1824 a hackney-coach driver named William Clarke spent a month in the House of Corrections for overcharging a fare. This could well be our William as he married Anne in London in 1829. In 1832 the Clyst St. Mary's parish register recorded the baptism of daughter, Isabella. They family was living in Sowton and William's occupation was servant. He was probably employed at Winslade House where his Uncle John was bailiff. The Heavitree parish register included 2 additional children for William and Anne--William born 1834, died 1835 and Matilda born 1837, died 1841. Daughter, Mary Anne, was born in 1841 and married John Wright in Toronto, Canada.  Daughter, Isabella, was born 1832 in Ottery St Mary or Sowton, Devon.  She married George John Burd in 1849 in London.  they remained in England.  She died in 1889,

 On Caroline's birth registration his occupation is shown as Tavern keeper at the Royal Oak Inn, Heavitree. This was also their residence. On the 1841 UK Census William, Anne and Caroline were still living on Fore Street in Heavitree. His occupation was proprietor. The family appears in the 1851 UK census in London in Lambeth on Burdett St. William's occupation was publican.

Research from the records office in Devon provides the following information:

 In December 1832 there were no entries under William CLARKE and the Royal Oak In May 1832 William DYMOND was occupier, Hooper & Co owners of the Royal Oak It would therefore seem that the Royal Oak changed ownership between 1832 and 1833, with William CLARKE arriving as the new tenant. In April 1833 William CLARKE was occupier, Mr HOWARD owner of the Royal Oak. In May 1834 William CLARKE was occupier, Mr HOWARD owner of the Royal Oak [PO12]. William son of William& Anne CLARKE of Heavitree, victualler, 16 November 1834. 1835 there was an entry for Wm CLARK [sic], Royal Oak PH, & fly sender, Heavitree 

In August 1837 William CLARKE was occupier, John HOWARD senior owner of the Royal Oak [PO17]. Matilda daughter of William & Anne CLARKE of Heavitree, chaise driver, 22 February 1837

 February 1839 William CLARKE was occupier, John HOWARD senior owner of the Royal Oak [PO21].

 Mary Anne daughter of William & Ann CLARKE of Heavitree, post hire keeper, 29 August 1841—fly man Civil Registration 

Elizabeth HOWARD recorded as the owner of the buildings occupying plot 284, and William CLARKE recorded as the occupier. It would therefore seem that in 1842 William was a tenant.1843 William CLARKE, abode Heavitree, was qualified to vote by being owner or occupier of a house in the town. In 1844 he was recorded as William CLARK. Appears in Pigot’s as Clarke—Royal Oak. There was no entry for him in 1845.

 On daughter, Isabella's, marriage record in 1849 he appears as a coffee house keeper in London on the Strand. In 1850 London Directory he is in Leiciester Square and 1848 at 1 Strand Lane with coffee rooms. 

 They would have come to Toronto, ON some time between 1852-58. In 1853, there are 3 tax assessments for William Clarke in St. Andrews Ward, near the Cathedral where Caroline and William were married. William Clarke, working as a bookkeeper for Fulton and Michie, resided on Park Lane through 1860. In 1862, Ann Clark, widow of William, appears as a dressmaker on Elizabeth St. This is very near where her daughter Mary Anne Wright lived.

 6. Caroline M.6 Clarke (William5, Joseph4, Richard3, Samuell2, Samuell1) was born 1839 in England (Heavitree, Exeter, Devonshire), and died 1908 in Chicago, IL. She married William Henry Thomas 07 Jul 1858 in Anglican Cathedral, Toronto, Canada, son of Benjamin Thomas and Mary Hayward. He was born 1829 in Canada (Brighton, Carleton, New Brunswick), and died 1914 in Chicago, IL.

 

 

ANCESTORS OF ANNE MARSHALL 

1. James Marshall-. He married Bessie Huntar in 1605 in Mid Calder, Midlothian, Scotland.

 2. Johne Marshall-(James-1). He married Janet Potter in 1637 in Mid Calder, Midlothian, Scotland,  daughter of William Pottar and Janet Loury. She was born in 1619. Johne was a farmer and he and Janet were not married at the time of James Alexander’s birth.   

3. James AlexanderMarshall-(Johne-2, James-1). He married Margaret Farrier in 1669 in Mid Calder, Midlothian, Scotland, daughter of William Farrier and Janet Deanes. She was born in 1647 in East Calder, Midlothian, Scotland.

 4 .Thomas Marshall-4James Alexander-3, Johne-2, James-1) was born in 1674 in Mid Calder, Midlothian, Scotland. He married Margaret Hardy in 1697 in Cramond, Midlothian, Scotland, daughter of William Hardy and Margaret Crawford. She was born in 1679 in Cramond, Midlothian, Scotland. 

5. John Marshall-(Thomas-4, James Alexander-3, Johne-2, James-1) was born in 1701 in Mid Calder, Midlothian, Scotland (Baptised at Cramond.). He married Marion Gloag in 1737 in Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland, daughter of Shipmaster Henry Glog and Helen Louriston. She was born in 1701 in Cramond, Midlothian, Scotland.  

He grew up in Mid Calder in the area of the old Roman Camp. He was a baxter (baker). Marion was presented for bapism by her Uncle John as her father was at sea.  

6...Henry Marshall-(John-5, Thomas-4, James Alexander-3, Johne-2, James-1) was born in 1741 in North Leith, Midlothian, Scotland. He married Isabel Bruce, daughter of Robert Bruce and Isabel Napier. She was born in 1743 in South Leith, Midlothian, Scotland.  

Henry was a sailor who was abroad when his son, John was born in 1769

 7. John Marshall-(Henry-6, John-5, Thomas-4, James Alexander-3, Johne-2, James-1) was born in 1769 in South Leith, Midlothian, Scotland. He died in 1813 in Leith, Midlothian, Scotland. He married Isabella Shadoway in 1797 in Leith, Midlothian, Scotland, daughter of Robert Shadoway and Isabel Waddel. She was born in 1771 in Carriden, Scotland.  

He was a carpenter probably on the ships in the port. When Ann was born the family lived in the Coal Hill section of Leith.

 8..Anne Marshall-(John-7, Henry-6, John-5, Thomas-4, James Alexander-3, Johne-2, James-1) was born in 1801 in North Leith, Midlothian, Scotland[1]. She died in 1885 in Toronto, Canada. She married William Clarke in 1829 in St Marleybone, London, England, son of Joseph Clarke and Jane Easton. He was born about 1801 in Sowton, Devonshire, England... He died in 1862 in Toronto, Canada..

 Anne probably came to England as a servant. She pobably was working in London and met William through while was driving a hackney coach in London. She in Toronto in 1862, a dressmaker, listed as the widow of William. She is found in the Toronto 1871 census living with her daughter, Mary Anne Wright. She died in 1885 in Toronto of apoplexy.

Topic Details

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George Hayward & Ann Durley arrive from England:
1763 1
Joshua Thomas arrives NB Spring Fleet:
1783 1
Benjamin Born Sunbury County, NB:
1797 1

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