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National Archives and Footnote Launch Project to Digitize Historic Documents

Washington, DC and Lindon, UT%u2026 Archivist of the United States Allen Weinstein and Footnote, Inc. CEO Russell Wilding today announced an agreement to digitize selected records from the vast holdings of the National Archives. The 4.5 million pages that have been digitized so far are now available at www.footnote.com/nara.

This non-exclusive agreement, beginning with the sizeable collection of materials currently on microfilm, will enable researchers and the general public to access millions of newly-digitized images of the National Archives historic records on a subscription basis from the Footnote website. By February 6, the digitized materials will also be available at no charge in National Archives research rooms in Washington D.C. and regional facilities across the country. After an interval of five years, all images digitized through this agreement will be available at no charge through the National Archives website.

"This is an exciting step forward for the National Archives," said Professor Weinstein. "It will immediately allow much greater access to approximately 4.5 million pages of important documents that are currently available only in their original format or on microfilm. The digitization of documents will also enhance our efforts to preserve our original records."

"The partnership with the National Archives will expand significantly the content we are able to offer professional and amateur researchers," said Footnote CEO Russell Wilding. "We will continue to add millions of original documents and images monthly. "

The following represents a portion of the millions of historic documents that will be made available as part of the National Archives - Footnote Agreement.

Papers of the Continental Congress (1774-89).The Papers of the Continental Congress include Journals of the Congress, reports of its committees, papers submitted by state Governments, and correspondence of its Presidents and other officers with diplomatic representatives of the United States abroad, officers in the Continental Army, State and local officials, and private persons. Among the Papers are copies of the Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Confederation, the Northwest Ordinance, the Constitution, and other documents instrumental in molding the new Government. Also included are drafts of treaties and commercial agreements, papers relating to expenditures and loans, reports of military progress during the Revolution, and papers relating to Indian treaties and tribes.

Mathew B Brady Collection of Civil War Photographs. One of the largest and most frequently researched bodies of Civil War photography anywhere, this series originated with some 6,000 glass plate negatives acquired by the War Department from Brady in 1874-1875. Encompassing images by the enterprising Brady and more than a dozen other photographers, including Alexander Gardner and Timothy O'Sullivan, directly or indirectly associated with him, the series ranges from Brady Gallery portraits of leading military and political personalities of the 1850's-1860's to views of units, battlefields, ruins, landscapes, camps, hospitals, prisons, fortifications, bridges, and railroads from Fredericksburg to Chickamauga to Atlanta.

Southern Claims Commission. In the 1870s, some southerners claimed compensation from the U.S. government for items used by the Union Army, ranging from corn and horses, to trees and church buildings. The claim files contain a wealth of genealogical information and they consist of petitions, inventories of properties lost, testimony of family members and others, reports, and certificates submitted by claimants to the Southern Claims Commission as proof of loyalty to the Federal Government and value of property damaged or lost during the Civil War. The materials are arranged by state and thereunder by the name of the claimant.

Name Index to Civil War and Later Pension Files. Pension applications for service in the U.S. Army between 1861 and 1900, grouped according to the units in which the veterans served. The name index to the Civil War and Later Pension Application Files contains over 3 million index entries documenting the applications of soldiers, sailors and their widows. The index is the entry point for one of the most significant bodies of Federal records documenting the lives of volunteers who served in the Civil War, the western Indian Wars, and the Spanish American War.

Investigative Case Files of the Bureau of Investigation, 1908-22. The Bureau of Investigation investigated real and perceived threats to the nation and its citizens before it became the FBI. The materials compiled by the BOI from 1908 to 1922 consist of an index to the investigative case files, general investigative records, investigative records relating to German Aliens from 1915 through 1920, investigative records relating to Mexican Neutrality Violations from 1909 through 1921, and investigative records transferred from the Department of Justice from 1920 through 1921. The records are arranged alphabetically by the name of the person or organization investigated.

About the National Archives The National Archives and Records Administration, an independent federal agency, is the nation's record keeper. Founded in 1934, its mission is unique %u2014to serve American democracy by safeguarding and preserving the records of our Government, ensuring that the people can discover, use, and learn from this documentary heritage. The National Archives ensures continuing access to the essential documentation of the rights of American citizens and the actions of their government. It supports democracy, promotes civic education, and facilitates historical understanding of our national experience. The National Archives meets a wide range of information needs, among them helping people to trace their families' history, making it possible for veterans to prove their entitlement to medical and other benefits, and preserving original White House records. The National Archives carries out its mission through a nationwide network of archives, records centers, and Presidential Libraries, and on the Internet at www.archives.gov.

About Footnote, Inc. Founded in 1997 as iArchives, Inc., Footnote is a subscription based website that features searchable original documents that provide users with an unaltered view of the events , places and people that shaped the American nation and the world. At Footnote.com all are invited to come to share, discuss, and collaborate on their discoveries with friends, family, and colleagues. For more information, visit www.footnote.com. * * * For press information, contact National Archives Public Affairs staff at 202-357-5300, or Footnote, Inc. spokesman Justin Schroepfer at 801-494-6517.

You'll find additional information at the National Archives website.

Utah Company A Part Of History With New Website

Salt Lake City, UT

By Paul Foy - Associated Press

A Utah company has launched a Web site to display historical documents - including some from the American Revolution and well before - in a partnership with the U.S. National Archives.

iArchives Inc. was already making digital images of documents for businesses, universities and other organizations when it decided to put those skills to use on a subscriber Web site that would showcase the nation's trove of historical documents.

While copies of famous documents like the U.S. Constitution and Declaration of Independence have been circulating for more than 200 years, footnote.com gives subscribers a chance to see more rare pieces of history.

Among the Web site's current collection are investigative and trial documents from the assassination of President Lincoln as well Indian treaties from the 1720s.

Footnote.com allows people to post their own historical documents and work with collaborators.

"We allow people to tag and index their own documents and share it," said Russell Wilding, the 50-year-old chief executive of iArchives. "We want to be America's shoe box."

The Web site was launched Jan. 10 and is adding documents daily. Starting with the most significant ones from the National Archives, it already has amassed some 7 million pages of documents.

Footnote.com is the only Web site wholly devoted to making digital images of American historical documents, said Susan Cooper, a spokeswoman for the U.S. National Archives.

The National Archives holds 9 billion pages of documents, some still classified, and it has no money to turn them into digital images, so it readily agreed to a partnership with footenote.com, she said.

iArchives is buying copies of microfilms of documents and turning them into digital images. In return, the National Archives, and patrons who go there, get free access to footnote.com.

Others pay up to $99 a year, and footnote.com has attracted about 10,000 subscribers so far, Wilding said.

Under the partnership, footnote's images will be available for anyone to see on National Archives' Web site five years after the company first makes use of them.

"We think it's a very good deal for the American people," Cooper said.

The Web site just added documents from the Lincoln assassination. It also contains papers from the FBI's predecessor, the Bureau of Investigation, including a file on publisher William Randolph Hearst's alleged ties to Mexican rebels.


The Web site's entire collection includes photographs, journals, letters, birth certificates, christening records and newspaper articles.


"We feel there is a tremendous demand for people to access original source documents and be able to share and collaborate and communicate," Wilding said.


Footnote.com Releases Original Lincoln Assassination Trial Papers

Lindon, UT

Business News Wire

Footnote.com has released its new collection, The Investigation and Trial Papers Relating to the Assassination of President Lincoln. Available for the first time on the Web, these original records provide a unique view into one of the last major events in the American Civil War.

Founded in 1997 as iArchives, Inc., Footnote is a subscription-based Website that features searchable original documents that provide users with an unaltered view of the events, places and people that shaped the American nation and the world

"April 14 marks the 142nd anniversary of Lincoln's assassination and we're excited that we can make these historical documents more easily accessible in a digitized format," said Russell Wilding, CEO of Footnote.com. "There are hidden stories in these documents just waiting to be discovered."

The collection includes the original records of the trial, including copies of The Daily National Intelligencer, which reported verbatim every question and every answer given during the ensuing court-martial of eight of the co-conspirators of Lincoln's assassination.

To view free samples of the trial papers, visit www.footnote.com/lincoln.php. Footnote members can sign-in and examine the entire collection. To become a member, register on the Footnote site, www.footnote.com.

Hankering to probe Lincoln's death? Digitized documents and your fingertips

Salt Lake City, UT

Lindon-based company releases images of the original records

By Kaye Nelson
Deseret Morning News

LINDON %u2014 Saturday marked the 142nd anniversary of President Abraham Lincoln's assassination, and now anyone can access digitized images of documents relating to his death.

Footnote.com, a Lindon-based company, is releasing a new collection of papers titled "The Investigation and Trial Papers Relating to the Assassination of President Lincoln." Available now on their Web site, the digitized images of these original records give more than a glimpse into a defining moment in American history.

"These are public documents all on microfilm or paper where you had to go to Washington, D.C., to request to see them," said Russell Wilding, CEO of Footnote.com. "Now we are digitizing them. They are all online and can be used as an education system as well as for hard-core researchers and hobbyists."

The company was formed in 1994 and in 2000 transitioned to digitizing microfilm, said Wilding. A year ago it started focusing on creating a repository of historical content.

Some points on the site require a fee, but free information is available as well. If you see an image you want, you pay $1.99 for it. Another option is to pay a monthly $9.99 fee or an annual $99 fee, both providing unlimited access.

"We want to be the world's shoebox," Wilding said. "We also have a free area where people can go in and upload their own content for others to see." Unlike Wikipedia, other site visitors will not be able to change the information, but they will be able to make comments on what is listed there.

All of the documents come from the National Archives in Washington, D.C., which holds a daunting 9 billion documents. So far, Footnote.com has 7 million of those documents online, with an estimated 50 million by the end of the year. They are scanning in 2 million images a month.

"The National Archives is only one place we'll pull records from," Wilding said. "We'll also access state archives and others domestically and internationally."

Justin Schroepfer, director of marketing, said the initial response to the site has been good. The company did a soft launch in January but realized that with anniversaries such as Lincoln's assassination, they could get more people interested in what they have to offer.

"Now that we've launched the site, we're going to do releases with content," Schroepfer said. "The Lincoln assassination is something people are familiar with." He said the company will tie in other events such as the Emancipation Proclamation or presidents' birthdays in the future.

Although there are many genealogy sites online, there isn't anything like this where valuable, historical documents are readily available. And other companies were vying for what Footnote.com now has rights to.

Google was considered in the mix to provide this service, said Schroepfer. But Footnote.com had this service as its main focus and it is excited to partner with the National Archives to provide the service.

"It took time to dot the i's and cross the t's," Schroepfer said. "We have a lot of bottled energy at this place. We just want to get the word out and tell people what we're trying to do."

E-mail: knelson@desnews.com

http://deseretnews.com/dn/view/1%2C1249%2C660211985%2C00.html

Footnote.com Releases Original Revolutionary War Documents for the First Time on the Internet

Lindon, Utah

Revolutionary War hero John Paul Jones is best remembered for responding, "I have not yet begun to fight," when asked by the British if he wanted to surrender while doing battle on the night of September 23, 1779.

Did you also know that he began his Naval career at the age of 13 or that his given name was John Paul? It is believed that he adopted the surname Jones to throw authorities off his trail after being accused of flogging a man to death. Based on historical documents it seems John Paul Jones had a number of disagreements with authorities that prevented him from rising higher than a captain in the Continental Navy.

Footnote.com released a collection of Revolutionary War documents available for the first time on the Internet. Featuring collections such as the Revolutionary War Service Records, Papers of the Continental Congress and Revolutionary War Rolls, Footnote.com is quickly becoming the leading source for original documents relating to the birth of the United States.

"Through our partnership with the National Archives and Records Administration, we are able to bring these valuable historical records to more people than ever before," said Roger Bell, President of Footnote.com. "Footnote is truly reinventing how people access and interact with history."

These documents, which have never been available before on the Internet, expose a side of the Revolutionary War that few have seen before. Within these collections Footnote members will find original letters written by George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin as well as military records for soldiers serving in the war.

Visitors to www.footnote.com/revolutionary-war.php can access free samples of these original documents as well as story pages created by Footnote members.

Footnote.com Teams with FamilySearch to Release Revolutionary War Pension Files

Lindon, Utah

Today, Footnote.com announced an agreement with FamilySearch, historically known as the Genealogical Society of Utah, a nonprofit organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.  FamilySearch is the world’s largest repository of genealogical information.

This new partnership brings together two organizations that will utilize their combined resources to digitize and make available many large historical collections.  The first project will be the three million U.S. Revolutionary War Pension files which will be published for the first time online in their entirety.

“The Revolutionary War Pensions will provide an intimate look into the historical events and individuals that shaped our country’s history,” said Russell Wilding, CEO of Footnote.com.  “We are excited about this relationship which enables us to put many more historical collections online.”

The Revolutionary War Pension Files feature original records that  include muster rolls, payrolls, strength returns and other miscellaneous personnel pay and supply records of American Army Units from 1775-1783. They provide a wealth of new information for historians and genealogists which they can share with other colleagues and family members.  

“We are excited to partner with Footnote.com to provide historians and genealogists alike a tremendous source of data that will assist greatly in putting puzzle pieces together to create a rich family history,” said Paul Nauta, manager of Public Affairs for FamilySearch. “This affiliation allows us to better meet one of our goals to provide as much data online as fast as possible for those working on their genealogy.”

Also, as a part of this agreement, Footnote.com will be accessible for free in all FamilySearch operated centers worldwide.  FamilySearch has more than 4,500 Family History Centers in 70 countries.  

Since partnering with the National Archives in January 2007, Footnote.com has digitized over eight million historical records.  Each month an additional two million documents are digitized and added to the site.  Footnote.com estimates that by the end of 2007 it will have made over 25 million digitized documents available on its web site.  

To see free examples of the Revolutionary War Pension Files, go to www.footnote.com/revolutionary-war.php.

Footnote.com has now begun offering free seven-day trial memberships. To start a free trial, visit www.footnote.com/freetrial.php
    
About Footnote, Inc.
Founded in 1997 as iArchives, Inc., Footnote is a subscription-based website that features searchable original documents that provide users with an unaltered view of the events , places and people that shaped the American nation and the world. At Footnote.com all are invited to come to share, discuss, and collaborate on their discoveries with friends, family, and colleagues.  For more information, visit www.footnote.com.

About Family Search
FamilySearch (historically known Genealogical Society of Utah) is a nonprofit organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. FamilySearch maintains the world's largest repository of genealogical resources accessed through FamilySearch.org, the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, and over 4,500 family history centers in 70 countries.

Footnote.com Partners with the Center for Research Libraries

Washington, D.C.

Today, Footnote.com announced a new partnership with The Center for Research Libraries (CRL), a non-profit organization that collects and preserves scholarly materials on behalf of 233 North American universities, colleges, and independent research libraries.  

This new partnership will result in the digitization and indexing of historical documents including U.S. ethnic newspapers, military records, and other materials that provide a unique perspective on American history.  “This partnership will enable us to provide wider access to rare American materials.” said Bernard Reilly, President of CRL.

“Working with CRL will provide Footnote.com members with access to original records that offer insight into a side of American history that few have seen before.” said Roger Bell, President of Footnote.com.  “Our goal is to make important historical materials like this available to as many people as possible, and partnerships like this with CRL enable us to achieve that goal.”  

As a result of this partnership, universities and libraries affiliated with CRL will have access to selected CRL content available on Footnote.com for free at their physical locations.  Others can gain access to these valuable records through their Footnote.com memberships.

This partnership is the latest in a series of key relationships Footnote.com has secured since January 2007, beginning with The National Archives and FamilySearch.  Working together with these organizations has boosted Footnote.com to be one of the fastest growing sites providing historical content on the web.  With over 12 million records already online, Footnote.com is adding over two million new documents per month providing access to exciting historical documents and images that have never been available on the internet before.  

View free sample documents on Footnote.com.

Footnote.com has now begun offering free seven-day trial membership.  Start a complimentary trial membership today.

About Footnote.com
Founded in 1997 as iArchives, Inc., Footnote.com unites the best content from the world’s archives with treasures from individual shoeboxes and encourages discovery, discussion and sharing of stories.  With millions of original documents, Footnote.com is creating communities around the priceless stories of our past and enables individuals to add their own images and insights.  For more information, visit http://www.footnote.com.

About Center for Research Libraries
Founded in 1949 by 10 major U.S. research universities, CRL is a nonprofit organization that supports advanced research and teaching in the humanities, sciences, and social sciences by ensuring the availability of diverse knowledge resources vital to those activities.  In the years since its inception, CRL membership has grown to 233 North American universities, colleges, and independent research libraries.  It is based in Chicago and governed by a Board of Directors drawn entirely from the higher education and libraries community.

Footnote Contact
Justin Schroepfer
Footnote.com
801-494-6517
justin@footnote.com

PR Contact:
Jeremy Kartchner
Snapp Conner PR
801 994-9625
jeremy@snappconner.com

Footnote.com Announces Official Launch of the Company and Reveals First-Hand Accounts of the Birth of America

Lindon, UT

--Original Records Include Rarely Seen Hand Written Letters From George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, John Adams and Other Founding Fathers--

Lindon, Utah %u2013 June 28, 2007 %u2013 Today Footnote.com announced the official launch of the company and its Web 2.0 historical social networking site.

As part of the launch, Footnote.com is making a significant portion of their millions of original Revolutionary War documents available for free from today until the end of July. Included in these records are secret journals, intercepted letters from the British military and letters written by George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin and other founding fathers. Click here to see samples of these Revolutionary War documents.

With the ability to view these original records on the web, people are now discovering a new side of history few have seen before. For example, the 4th of July has always been considered as the day we celebrate our nation's independence. However, in a letter to his wife, John Adams wrote that July 2nd would be "the most memorable epoch in the history of America... it will be celebrated by succeeding generations as the great anniversary festival."

"Many people may know the high level details of American history, however, information about specific events and the heroic individuals involved are often overlooked " said Roger Bell, President of Footnote.com. "Documents included in our Revolutionary War collection provide valuable insights about our nation's history that appeal to professional historians while making history fun for anyone with even a casual interest"

In addition to providing historical records, Footnote.com provides tools such as Story Pages and Spotlights that let users upload and share their own insights and discoveries. The future of history is on Footnote.com. To view these records please visit the Footnote.com web site www.footnote.com.

About Footnote, Inc.
Founded in 1997 as iArchives, Inc., Footnote is a subscription based website that features searchable original documents that provide users with an unaltered view of the events , places and people that shaped the American nation and the world. At Footnote.com all are invited to come to share, discuss, and collaborate on their discoveries with friends, family, and colleagues. For more information, visit www.footnote.com.

Footnote.com Exposes Government UFO Records

Lindon, Utah, USA

Today, Footnote.com announced that they have digitized the entire Project Bluebook, a collection of official records covering the United States Government's investigation of UFO phenomenon from 1947%u20131969. From Alaska to Florida, Project Bluebook features fascinating accounts of UFO sightings from every state. Now for the first time, the entire collection of case files is available on the internet at Footnote.com for free.

This collection provides a rarely seen view into a subject that has captured the attention and imagination of millions over the decades. Project Bluebook also allows users to determine for themselves if the UFO phenomenon is all a conspiracy theory, hallucinations or solid evidence supporting the fact that we are not alone in the universe.

"The collections on our site illustrate how Footnote.com is changing the way people access and interact with history," said Russell Wilding, CEO of Footnote.com. "Through our social networking tools people from around the world can come together to discuss their findings and provide their own unique insights through annotations and creating their own web pages."

There is more evidence to consider, including accounts from around the country such as, "Definitely not a weather balloon," and "The university students were allegedly taken to the third moon of Jupiter in a saucer manned by good-looking seven-foot-tall giants." Who knows what new secrets will be exposed? Click here to learn more about Project Bluebook on Footnote.

In addition to free access to Project Blue Book records, Footnote.com offers a seven-day free trial to all of the original records that have been digitized and indexed from some of the largest archives in the United States, including the National Archives. Click here to learn how to start your free trial to Footnote.com today.

About Footnote, Inc.
Founded in 1997 as iArchives, Inc., Footnote is a subscription-based website that features searchable original documents that provide users with an unaltered view of the events , places and people that shaped the American nation and the world. At Footnote.com all are invited to come to share, discuss, and collaborate on their discoveries with friends, family, and colleagues. For more information, visit www.footnote.com.

Footnote.com Announces New Partnership with the Largest Public Genealogy Library in the U.S.

Lindon, UT

-Footnote.com to begin digitizing content from Allen County Public Library -

Lindon, Utah %u2013 August 2, 2007 %u2013Today, Footnote.com announced a new partnership with Allen County Public Library (ACPL), the largest public genealogy library in the United States to digitize millions of historical records making them available online for the first time at Footnote.com. 

The ACPL collections feature unique American and International records including family histories, city directories, military records and historical newspapers.

"We're excited to partner with the Allen County Public Library and are fortunate to be working with some of the finest archives in the United States" said Roger Bell, president of Footnote.com "The content from ACPL is a valuable addition to the millions of records we currently have on our site." 

As part of the partnership, all ACPL records digitized by Footnote.com will be made available at the library for free.  For those that cannot travel to the library, these records can be accessed from a personal computer with a Footnote.com membership.

In addition to the ACPL, Footnote.com has agreements with The National Archives and Records Administration, the Pennsylvania Archives, FamilySearch, the Center for Research Libraries, and local archives in Goffstown, NH, South Boston, VA, Harris County, TX and others. 

Footnote.com doesn't just make history come alive, it keeps history alive.  Footnote.com has created a site where people with similar interests come together to share their discoveries and insights.  Visitors are encouraged to annotate documents, tell their own stories and upload content from their own shoeboxes %u2013 all for free. 

New Research Book From Elizabeth Shown Mills Now Available On Footnote.com

Lindon, UT

- Evidence Explained can now be obtained on Footnote.com

Lindon, Utah %u2013 August 15, 2007 %u2013Today, Footnote.com announced a partnership with Elizabeth Shown Mills to distribute her new book, Evidence Explained. This definitive guide to citation and analysis of historical resources features over 1,000 citation models and is now available in digital format on Footnote.com.

"The world of research is changing in exciting new ways" says Roger Bell, President of Footnote.com, "Evidence Explained is a great tool to help academics, students and genealogists use these new resources."

Mills was the long-term editor of the National Genealogical Society Quarterly and has delivered over 500 lectures globally, appeared on radio and TV talk shows on three continents, and was featured on the BBC's (British Broadcasting Corporation) 20th anniversary special on the novel Roots and the PBS-KBYU series Ancestors: Second Season. A recipient of the NGS President's Citation and the APG Graham T. Smallwood Jr. Award, Mills has been cited by her peers as "the genealogist who has had the greatest impact on American genealogy in the post-Roots era."

Historical and genealogical research has come a long way since the days of using encyclopedias and card catalogs. The digital age has added valuable resources including websites like Footnote.com, digital books, podcasts and more. Genealogical research can be challenging and Evidence Explained will help provide a better understanding of how to properly use these new resources.

For more information on Evidence Explained, visit www.footnote.com/evidenceexplained.

About Footnote, Inc.
Founded in 1997 as iArchives, Inc., Footnote.com is a subscription-based website that features searchable original documents that provide users with an unaltered view of the events , places and people that shaped the American nation and the world. At Footnote.com all are invited to come to share, discuss, and collaborate on their discoveries with friends, family, and colleagues. For more information, visit http://www.footnote.com.


Footnote.com Named One of PC Magazine's Top Undiscovered Web Sites of 2007

-- “Footnote is the quintessential Web-2.0 example of how to use your Web-browsing time wisely” -

Lindon, UT – August 30, 2007 – What may be considered an “undiscovered web site” may not be for long, having been named as one of PC Magazine’s Top Web sites of 2007. This recognition comes on the heels of being named as Editor’s Choice by the publication, receiving four-and-a-half out of five stars in that review.

“For genealogists, history buffs, and even the average passerby, Footnote is the quintessential Web-2.0 example of how to use your Web-browsing time wisely,” according to PC Magazine. “You can find anything from handwritten notes from the Continental Congress to Project Blue Book UFO sightings.”

Footnote.com, a social networking site revolving around history and genealogy, features millions of images of original historical documents available on the internet for the first time. Footnote.com has partnered with the finest archives in the United States including the National Archives, FamilySearch (The LDS Church), and Allen County Public Library.

What makes Footnote.com different is the site’s social networking component which enables members to showcase items from family shoeboxes including old photos, letters and documents. These artifacts from the past contain priceless stories that have too often been hidden in closets and basements. Footnote.com enables members to upload their treasures and create pages on the site that highlight their discoveries in addition to sharing their own insights on topics and history.

“Learning about history should be fun and engaging” says Roger Bell, President of Footnote.com, “When individuals come together to discuss shared interests, that’s when real discovery occurs. You can’t get that from just reading a text book.”

Visit Footnote.com today and see why PC Magazine describes it as “the sort of stuff that turns people into historians.”

About Footnote, Inc.
Footnote is a subscription-based website that features searchable original documents that provide users with an unaltered view of the events, places and people that shaped the American nation and the world. At Footnote.com all are invited to come to share, discuss, and collaborate on their discoveries with friends, family, and colleagues. For more information, visit www.footnote.com.

Footnote.com Makes Papers of Continental Congress Available for Free

Lindon, UT

-- Footnote.com will also include Papers of the Constitutional Congress and Copybooks of George Washington’s Correspondence-

Lindon, UT – September 11, 2007 –On September 5, 1774 the first continental congress convened at Carpenter’s Hall in Pennsylvania to draft a declaration of rights and grievances against Britain. More than a year later, on July 4, 1776, the Second Continental Congress officially adopted the Declaration of Independence.

Our founding fathers fought for freedom and Footnote.com feels it’s only appropriate to make the documents they created declaring our nation’s independence available for free online at www.footnote.com. Footnote.com will make a number of records from this period available for free, including:

* Papers of the Continental Congress
* Miscellaneous Papers of the Continental Congress
* Papers of the Constitutional Convention of 1787
* Copybooks of George Washington’s Correspondence

“These records are such an important part of our country’s history and we feel it is important to make them available to everybody who wants to see the documents in their original format,” said Roger Bell, President of Footnote.com. “We believe that seeing a document in its original format personalizes history, making it more tangible and interesting while providing a greater understanding and appreciation for what transpired.”

Since January 2007, Footnote.com has partnered with The National Archives and Records Administration, the Pennsylvania Archives, FamilySearch, the Allen County Public Library, the Center for Research Libraries, and local archives in Goffstown, NH, South Boston, VA, Harris County, TX and others.

Footnote.com doesn’t just make history come alive, it keeps history alive. Footnote.com has created a social networking site where people with similar interests can come together to share their discoveries and insights. Visitors are encouraged to annotate documents, tell their own stories and upload content from their own shoeboxes – all for free.

Footnote.com has also made a number of other titles available for free, including:

* US Milestone Documents
* Project Blue Book
* Pennsylvania Archives

To view the free collections please visit www.footnote.com/free. To register to become a subscriber to the site please visit www.footnote.com/becomeamember.

About Footnote, Inc.
Footnote is a subscription-based website that features searchable original documents that provide users with an unaltered view of the events, places and people that shaped the American nation and the world. At Footnote.com all are invited to share, discuss, and collaborate on their discoveries with friends, family, and colleagues. For more information, visit www.footnote.com.


Footnote.com Digitizes Late 18th Century Newspaper, The Times (London)

Lindon, UT

-The Times (London) Includes Details about King George, Napoleon, as well as Trials, Advertisements and Everyday Life

LINDON, Utah--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Footnote.com today announced the release of original images from The Times (London from 1785 – 1820). These documents include details about prominent figures of that time such as King George and Napoleon Bonaparte.

“Each page in this collection is full of intriguing details about European life during late 18th and early 19th centuries,” says Russell Wilding, CEO of Footnote.com “We are excited to see what people will discover and share from this fascinating collection.”

In addition to details regarding prominent people, the newspapers provide interesting insight into everyday life in England at that time, including reports on crimes and trials, advertisements from local businesses, weather reports and announcements about local interests like the release of the newly published “Sense and Sensibility” by Jane Austen.

Footnote.com is a social networking site that allows users to do more than just find historical documents. Footnote.com enables people to interact with history by providing tools that help users showcase their discoveries and share their insights with others.

“These records can be found in other places, but what makes Footnote.com so different is the social networking component we offer,” explains Wilding. “Social networking isn’t just for young people on MySpace or Facebook anymore. People of all ages with different interests like history are now interacting with each other on the internet. Footnote.com has made it easy for anyone to come online and join in The History Revolution.”

Visit Footnote.com to access free samples of these original documents and to see what Footnote members have contributed.

About Footnote, Inc.

Founded in 1997 as iArchives, Inc., Footnote.com is a subscription website that features searchable original documents that provide users with an unaltered view of the events, places and people that shaped the American nation and the world. At Footnote.com all are invited to come share, discuss, and collaborate on their discoveries with friends, family, and colleagues. For more information, visit www.footnote.com.

Footnote.com Launches the Largest Collection of World War II Photos on the Web

Lindon, Utah

Footnote.com today announced the addition of thousands of US Air Force photos to their digital World War II collection. This release coincides with the anniversary of the Pearl Harbor bombing, and contains tens of thousands of original World War II photos and documents from the National Archives. Among this collection are missing air crew reports, documents from allied military conferences and photos of Japanese air targets.

“They say that a picture is worth a thousand words,” says Russell Wilding, CEO of Footnote.com. “What’s exciting about this collection of photos is they also include captions that tell stories of the people and events in the photos.”

Footnote.com has added these new pictures and documents as part of a much larger, ongoing effort to preserve the heroic memories and stories of the brave men and women that served in World War II and other wars.

“We are providing priceless content from our archives and libraries that is only a part of a much larger picture,” continued Wilding, “While this is an extensive collection of history, we understand that many people out there have valuable pieces of history in their personal record collections within their own homes. We encourage everyone to upload their own photos, letters and documents contained in their old shoeboxes.”

Footnote.com is leading the movement to preserve the documents and stories about World War II and invites everyone to join in this effort. Uploading photos and documents and creating memorial pages is completely free on Footnote.com. To view samples of these photos and other World War II documents, visit Footnote.com/wwii.php

Footnote.com Releases Lincoln Assassination Papers and Images of John Wilkes Booth Diary

Lindon, Utah

Foonote.com today announced the release of rare documents from The National Archives that provide a unique perspective of the Lincoln assassination and a first-hand look at this critical event in America’s history.

For a limited time, Footnote.com is providing free access to the Lincoln Assassination Collection which includes newspaper articles from The Daily National Intelligencer, handwritten testimonials and other documents used in the trials of the co-conspirators.

“There are many questions surrounding the death of President Lincoln,” observes Footnote.com CEO Russ Wilding. “Who helped John Wilkes Booth with the assassination? What happened in the trials of the co-conspirators? These documents are a national treasure that provide real answers to these questions and many more.”

In addition to this intriguing set of documents, the Footnote community has been uploading photos of Lincoln, Booth, and the actual Booth Diary from their own personal collections.

 “We love to see our community get involved,” says Wilding. “There are so many historical treasures contained in shoeboxes that are tucked away in closets and attics.  We encourage everyone to upload their shoeboxes of letters, documents and photos to Footnote.com to preserve and share their own histories.”

Footnote.com is the place where history comes alive. The site has something for everyone from avid researchers to those with a casual interest in the stories of our past.   Visit Footnote.com today and see the future of history.

Footnote.com Celebrates Its First Anniversary

Lindon, Utah

One year ago this month, Footnote.com partnered with the National Archives to digitize and make available records accessible for the first time on the internet. Since that time, Footnote.com has become the social networking site for history buffs and genealogists.

“When we think of social networking sites, we typically think of MySpace and Facebook,” said Russell Wilding, CEO of Footnote.com. “Now we see a trend shifting towards sites, such as Footnote.com, that have integrated social networking tools with unique content.”

In its first year, Footnote.com has added over 25 million images of original historical documents, including records from the American Revolution, the Lincoln Assassination, FBI Case Files, and even UFO reports from Project Bluebook.   

“We want to be more than just another record repository on the Web,” says Wilding. “We are building a social environment where people can share, collaborate, and discuss their discoveries with family, friends, and others with similar interests.”

Members on Footnote.com are encouraged to create their own web pages, collaborate with other members, and upload their own content for free. With millions of pages viewed every month and tens of thousands of members actively participating on the site, Footnote.com is barely hitting the tip of the iceberg.

“We have found that the majority of the visitors to the site are Baby Boomers and internet users over 60, commonly referred to as ‘Silver Surfers’,” explains Justin Schroepfer, Marketing Director at Footnote.com. “This audience has a strong interest in history and has the time to engage in this type of activity.”

With an active audience and adding millions of new documents to the site every month, Footnote.com is certainly changing the way we think about and interact with the events and people of our past.

Footnote.com Opens records to the public In honor of Black History Month

Lindon, UT

Footnote.com today announced free access to select databases during February in celebration of Black History Month. These databases include original historical records from the Amistad case, the program for the 1963 March on Washington and the Southern Claims Commission records from the Civil War.

“The Southern Claims Commission records document the experiences of former slaves during the Civil War and in the days immediately after,” says Toni Carrier, Founding Director of the USF Africana Heritage Project. “They often contain information that cannot be found anywhere else. Family historians should plan to spend some quality time with this collection.”

The majority of the records on Footnote.com come from the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). Since partnering with NARA a year ago, Footnote.com has been working aggressively to digitize and make these original source documents available online.

To date, Footnote.com has digitized over 26 million images. Each month, approximately 2 million new records are uploaded to the site. "Our partnership with Footnote has brought millions of our documents to far more researchers than ever before possible,” says James Hastings, Director of Access Programs at NARA. “Now researchers can come to any or our research rooms across the country and use the online indexes and records free of charge. And for a small fee they can have access to this rich historical collection in their own homes. We look forward to many years of working together to help Americans understand their history."

In addition to the records Footnote.com uploads to its site every month, members of the site are also making contributions by adding records from their files at home and creating their own web pages dedicated to topics that interest them. Member pages pertaining to African American history include topics such as slavery, African American war heroes and Civil Rights.

“We love to see people get involved and take an active interest in history,” said Russ Wilding, CEO of Footnote.com. “There are so many historical treasures contained in shoeboxes that have been tucked away and forgotten in closets and attics. We encourage everyone to upload their shoeboxes of letters, documents and photos to Footnote.com to preserve and share their own histories.”

Footnote.com is the place where history comes alive. The site has something for everyone from avid researchers to those with a casual interest in the stories of our past. Visit Footnote.com today and see the future of history.

Footnote.com Launches Interactive Vietnam War Memorial

Lindon, UT

Footnote.com and the National Archives and Records Administration held a press conference at the Archives in Washington DC to announce the release of an online interactive photo of the Vietnam War Memorial.

In addition to releasing this unique version of the Wall, Footnote.com enables visitors to search the Wall for people they know and pay tribute by adding photos, comments and stories of those who lost their lives during the Vietnam conflict.

“The Wall is more than just 58,000 plus names,” explains Richard Schroepfer, a Vietnam War Veteran. “Many of these people were my friends. And now Footnote.com helps me create a remembrance of these fine gentlemen.”

Footnote.com started the project by contracting the expertise of Peter Krogh, a National Geographic photographer, who was given the challenge to photograph the entire wall. Creating this online version of the Wall required almost 1,500 individual photos that were stitched together to create one single image.

The process took over five months and resulted in an image that is nearly five gigapixels in size. Despite the immense size, just about anyone can view the image on Footnote.com via an Internet connection.

Footnote.com partnered with the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) to link the service records and casualty reports to each name on the Wall. “The records of the Vietnam War in the National Archives are essential resources for veterans to revisit their history and establish their rights,” explains Archivist of the United States Allen Weinstein. “These extensive files are mined by scholars every day as they continue to interpret and understand this pivotal period in American history.”

Footnote.com will also be digitizing National Archives photos from the Vietnam War. Finding someone on the Wall is as simple as typing a name into a search box and letting Footnote.com quickly locate and zoom into the area of the Wall where the individual name can be viewed. Once the name is located, visitors can see the soldier’s service record and view comments, stories and photos that have been contributed by other visitors.

“Footnote.com is about discovering, discussing, and sharing the stories of our past,” says Russell Wilding, CEO of Footnote.com. “We know that there are many untold experiences represented on that Wall, and we hope that this interactive version of the memorial helps those affected by the war by sharing their stories.”

Footnote.com also provides a way for visitors to create a tribute page dedicated to the brave men and women who served in Vietnam, who may not be on the Wall. These pages become a way for veterans, family and friends to share experiences and feelings about this event that has had a great impact on so many.

Footnote.com hopes that this interactive Wall becomes a means for healing and paying tribute to those whose sacrifice and service have been underappreciated for so long.

Footnote.com Adds Millions Of Historical Newspapers To Its Collection

Lindon, UT

Footnote.com announced today a new partnership with SmallTownPapers, Inc. that will add millions of pages of historical newspapers to the site. With over 28 million images of original documents already on Footnote.com, the historical newspapers will prove to be a valuable addition, providing a unique view of our nation’s history.

After using Footnote.com, SmallTownPapers President Paul Jeffko quickly realized the two companies had a natural synergy. "Our unique and exclusive small-town newspaper content is a boon for any researcher, and with Footnote.com providing high quality viewing, printing, and downloading, visitors are going to discover a new dimension and relevance to online history and genealogy research."

Unlike many of the major newspapers, small town newspapers give a glimpse into what day-to-day life was like for many Americans during that time. Visitors can browse articles of local news content, historic photos, and birth, marriage, and obituary announcements.

The image viewer on Footnote.com enables visitors to see images of the newspapers exactly as they were printed, dating back to the mid-19th century. “These newspapers can be found in other places, but what makes Footnote.com so different is the social networking component we offer,” explains Russ Wilding, CEO of Footnote.com. “Social networking isn’t just for young people on MySpace or Facebook anymore. People of all ages with different interests, including history, are now interacting with each other on the internet. Footnote.com has created an engaging and fun experience with content like historical newspapers, that enables people to discuss their discoveries with others.”

Visit www.footnote.com/smalltownpapers to access free samples of these newspapers and to see what Footnote members have contributed.

Footnote.com adds to its leading Civil War Collection by launching the first-ever interactive 1860 US Census

Lindon, UT

Today, Footnote.com announced the addition of the 1860 US Census to their Civil War Collection. This project was a joint effort with FamilySearch, who provided the images to the 1860 Census.  From those images, Footnote created a index enabling visitors to simply type in a name and search the millions of names contained in this collection.

As the largest online collection of original Civil War documents, this new addition to Footnote.com provides a snapshot of America before the bloodiest war in its history. The 1860 US Census reveals many details about individuals at that time. What was their occupation? Where were they born? What was their marital status? Did they attend school? Could they read or write? Was your ancestor insane, idiotic, or a convict? The 1860 US Census will let you know.

“Is the 1860 US Census already on the internet? Yes,” says Russ Wilding, CEO of Footnote.com. “But what makes the census different on Footnote is that these documents become interactive.”

Footnote.com has developed tools that enable visitors not only to find someone in the census, but also to enrich the records by adding photos, linking related documents, and contributing insights to any name on the record. “Now they’re not merely names on a document,” explains Russ Wilding. “They become people as the contributions start to tell a story about that person.”

This past March, Footnote.com released a similar project using the same technology with an interactive version of the Vietnam War Memorial. For each name on the Wall, a visitor can view military service information, attached photos and comments. The success of the project is overwhelming as priceless contributions are added to the Wall. Footnote expects similar results with the launch of the 1860 US Census.

At Footnote.com, it’s more than just looking at a historical document. History becomes a living subject on Footnote.com as documents from archives come together for the first time on the Internet. Visitors to Footnote.com can add their own contributions and upload their own shoeboxes of information. Letters, documents, and photos from the past create a view of history that few have seen before.

Every month, two million new documents are added to the site and over a million people visit the site. Footnote promises to continue to deliver new discoveries for those whose interests range from the serious historian to the casual visitor looking for something entertaining.

FamilySearch Teams with Footnote.com to Publish Historic Civil War Era Records

Salt Lake City, UT

FamilySearch announced today its records access agreement with Footnote.com to publish two significant Civil War Era databases online—the 1860 U.S. Census and Civil War Pensions Index. The two relevant collections will provide free online access to millions of names of individuals from the 1860 to 1865 period in the United States.  

The censuses and Civil War pension files are the most used collections of the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). The 1860 census provides a snapshot of families living during the Civil War Era. The index to the Civil War pension applications allows searchers to quickly see if a Civil War veteran or his widow applied for a pension—which can lead to rich family history information contained in the original pension document.

Under the agreement, FamilySearch will provide the digital images of the original documents for the 1860 U.S. Census and Footnote.com will provide the indexes to both the 1860 U.S. Census and Civil War Pensions. FamilySearch plans to publish the indexes for both of these collections for free this year at FamilySearch.org. The images of the original documents will also be viewable at Footnote.com (link to www.footnote.com) or accessed for free through the 4,500 FamilySearch Family History Centers located worldwide.

Civil War Pensions Index
Ten percent (3 million) of the U.S. population served or fought in the U.S. Civil War and 2 percent (620,000) died—more casualties than The American Revolutionary War, World War I, World War II, The War against Switzerland, The War of 1812, and the Vietnam War combined. If soldiers or their families applied for a pension from the government, an index card for the pension application should exist.

Each card usually lists the soldier's full name, rank, company and regiment, when he enlisted and discharged, and provides a certificate number required to order a copy of the original pension application from NARA. The completed index will allow users to search on a name, or browse by state, arm of service (infantry, cavalry, militia, etc.), regiment, and company to locate individual records.

1860 U.S. Census
The 1860 U.S. Census index will allows users to quickly search the names of 31 million people captured on the census. Additional information includes the age, sex, color, place of birth, and marriage status.  Slave schedules show the name of the slave owner, number of slaves owned, number of freed slaves, and the age, color, and gender of the slaves. The names of the slaves were not included in the 1860 Census.

“These record collections provide a valuable view of America during a critical time in its history,” said Russ Wilding, CEO of Footnote.com.  “Together with the other Civil War documents on Footnote.com, visitors are able to piece together a picture of our history that few have seen before.”

Ransom Love, director of Strategic Relationships for FamilySearch, added, “Footnote is targeting U.S. historical records and building their Civil War Collection. FamilySearch wants to provide free indexes to all of the U.S. Censuses online. This joint project helps bring both companies closer to their respective goals.”


Footnote.com Releases Largest Online Collection of U.S WWII and Vietnam War Photos

Lindon, UT

Collection Features More than 80,000 Photos from WWII and Vietnam Now Freely Accessible at Footnote.com


Lindon, UT May 22, 2008 – In commemoration of Memorial Day, Footnote.com today announced their entire collection of military photos will be made permanently free on the site.  The collection features over 80,000 photos from WWII and Vietnam making it the largest collection of its kind on the web.


Through their partnership with the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), Footnote.com has digitized and indexed the photos, which include images of downed aircraft, aerial photos of bombings, fighter groups and combat photos.  What makes the photos unique are the short captions included with the photos, which provide interesting details about the events and people featured.


The announcement follows closely behind Footnote.com’s recent release of an interactive version of the Vietnam War Memorial.  The online memorial is one of the largest images on the web and features a full-size photo of the memorial in Washington, DC.  Visitors to the interactive memorial can search for names of fallen veterans, connect with other people, and create tributes by adding their own photos and stories to the site.  To view the Vietnam War Memorial, go to www.footnote.com/thewall/.  


“Making history accessible is only one facet to our mission,” explains Russ Wilding, CEO of Footnote.com.  “Our goal is to create a site that enables people to interact with history; to add their own ‘footnote’ to history.”


Footnote.com encourages everyone to upload their own shoeboxes containing photos, letters and documents.  Members then can add their own comments, insights and create web pages highlighting their discoveries.   The web pages can also be used to create online memorials where family and friends can also contribute.


Footnote.com features over 35 million images on the site with two million new historical records being added each month.    To view the unique content on Footnote.com and see what the Footnote Community has been doing, visit www.footnote.com.

Footnote.com Provides Free Access to FBI Case Files from Early 1900s

Lindon, UT

In Celebration of the 100th Anniversary of the FBI, Footnote.com Opens Its FBI Collection Featuring over 2 Million Original Records


Espionage, bootlegging, war crimes, illegal aliens, and political wrongdoing.  
While this may sound like the latest Hollywood blockbuster it’s actually a review of some of the investigations the Federal Bureau of Investigations (FBI) has carried out over its 100 year history.


In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the FBI, Footnote.com announced their entire collection of FBI Case Files  will be freely accessible by the public through the end of August.  The collection contains over two million records featuring some very surprising hidden stories.


A few examples include, J. Edgar Hoover opening an investigation into actor Charlie Chaplin for allegedly making a contribution of $100,000 for socialist propaganda.  Baseball great Babe Ruth was investigated for draft dodging and newspaper mogul William Randolph Hurst was investigated for suspicion of funding the Mexican-American War.


The FBI Case Files date from 1908 to 1922 and feature cases involving espionage during WWI, investigations into German aliens who were politically suspect, reports of violations of prohibition and more.  Serious, as well as far-fetched accounts provide a fresh insider’s perspective to the history of this time period.


“Original documents are not only interesting but also provide a way to verify historical facts that may have been previously considered conspiracy theories,” says Russ Wilding, CEO of Footnote.com. “It’s important to have records like these available so people can understand and appreciate our nation’s history as well as the circumstances that lead to the actions taken..”


Through their partnership with the National Archives, Footnote.com has digitized and indexed over 41 million original records; the majority of which have never been seen on the Internet before.  Footnote.com continues to add millions of new documents to the site every month.


With easy to use tools and a social component to the site, Footnote.com is changing the way people access and interact with history.  “We’re more than just an online repository of historical records,” continues Wilding. “We’re an outlet where people can go to add their own viewpoints on history and to share their own insights and discoveries.”

 
Footnote.com also enables people to upload their own shoeboxes of photos, letters and other documents - adding to the ever-changing face of history.


Visit Footnote.com  today to view the FBI Case Files  and the millions of additional historical records.

Footnote.com Takes Social Networking into the Past

Lindon, UT

San Francisco -- September 10, 2008 Losing a loved one can result in a range of emotions, from the grief and sorrow to comfort, which often comes from reminiscing stories and memories with family and friends. The challenge arises when there is no single place where all of these stories can easily come together to be shared, enriched and preserved.


Now at Footnote.com, anyone can find or create Footnote Pages where users connect and share stories, photos, and information about the people important to them.


To kick-off the new Footnote Pages, Footnote.com today released over 80 million of these pages created from data from the Social Security Death Index. Most visitors will find existing pages about several deceased friends and family members already on the site.


Footnote.com was selected from over 1,000 applicants to launch Footnote Pages at this year’s TechCrunch50 held in San Francisco. Russ Wilding, CEO of Footnote, demonstrated Footnote Pages to an audience of over 1,500 investors, bloggers, and major media outlets.
“We encourage people to upload their personal shoeboxes of photos and documents to Footnote.com,” explains Wilding. “Now with Footnote Pages, friends and family can come together to share stories and memories about the people they care about.”


Described as Facebook for the Deceased, these pages feature a photo gallery, an interactive timeline and map, and other tools that bring people together to create a more colorful and rich picture of the past. “Social networking is not only for the younger generations any more,” explains Wilding. “We are seeing Baby Boomers contribute and connect online in increasing numbers. Footnote Pages are an easy way for this audience to interact with each other and learn things they would not otherwise know about deceased friends and family.”

Beyond profiling people, Footnote pages can also be used to document and discuss historical events or places including: the Vietnam War, the Assassination of JFK and the Lincoln-Douglas Debates.

Unlike other social networking sites, Footnote.com provides content that enables users to tell and share stories from the past. Through its partnership with the National Archives, Footnote.com has digitized over 43 million documents including historical newspapers, military records, photos and more. Footnote.com adds about 2 million new records to the site every month.


Visit Footnote.com to learn more about Footnote Pages and get a new perspective on the lives of your own friends and family who have passed away.

2008 Media Kit

Lindon, UT

Click here to access the most current version of the Footnote Media Kit

Footnote.Com And The National Archives Launch Internet’s Largest Interactive World War II Collection

Washington DC and Lindon, UT

Footnote.com and the National Archives and Records Administration announced today the release of the first ever interactive World War II collection, which includes an interactive version of the USS Arizona Memorial, WWII Hero Pages, and WWII photos and documents previously unavailable on the internet. 

“We can’t afford to forget this period in our history,” says James Hastings, Director of Access Programs at the National Archives. “Our ongoing partnership with Footnote.com helps ensure that the stories contained in these photos and documents are accessible to everyone, particularly those who cannot travel to our facilities to study the original records. This partnership complements our mission of making National Archives holdings as widely available as possible.”

Included in the WWII collection is the first-ever interactive version of the USS Arizona Memorial. Similar to the Vietnam War Memorial project that Footnote.com released last March, the USS Arizona Memorial is a fully searchable digital image of the national monument.   

The USS Arizona Memorial allows Footnote.com users to search for people they know by simply typing in a name.  The image viewer will zoom in to the specific area of the wall where that name appears. By placing the cursor over the name, users can access an interactive box featuring additional information about the sailors including a place to contribute photos and stories about that individual. 

In January 2007, Footnote.com partnered with the National Archives and other archives to digitize valuable records that contain the collective story of the United States.  Now featuring over 47 million documents and photos on the site, Footnote.com tools bring history to life by allowing users to connect with their past and with each other. 

For a limited time, Footnote.com is providing free access to their National Archives WWII collections that include:

•    Pearl Harbor Muster Rolls
•    Missing Air Crew Reports
•    U.S. Air Force Photos
•    Submarine Patrol Reports
•    Japanese Air Target Analysis
•    Army JAG Case Files
•    Navy JAG Case Files
•    Naval Press Clippings
•    Allied Military Conferences

“There’s more than just names, dates, and places,” explains Ted Young, a WWII Veteran, whose oldest brother died on the USS Arizona as a result of the Pearl Harbor bombing. “I hope that someday our grandsons or great grandsons will see this and have a better picture of what was going on in our time.” To see a video of Mr. Young explaining how he preserved his brother’s WWII experience on Footnote.com, click here.

In addition to the USS Arizona Memorial, Footnote.com is also releasing Hero Pages, an easy way to create a tribute or memorial to our war heroes. These Hero Pages feature an interactive timeline and map, a place to upload photos, documents and letters, and a place to share stories about individuals who fought in WWII. 

“These pages will tell a story that is not included history text books,” says Russ Wilding, CEO of Footnote.com. “What we find is the Hero Pages add to history with stories that were not always documented, but rather passed down from generation to generation. These Hero Pages are a great way to involve the entire family and bring them together to add their pieces of the puzzle that make up their history.”

Footnote.com and the National Archives have already created over 9 million Hero Pages from the Army Enlistment Records. Footnote.com invites those who were impacted by World War II to come and find or create a Hero Page, and preserve those memories that are disappearing too quickly.


Click here to see the WWII content including the USS Arizona and Hero Pages.

About Footnote, Inc.
Footnote.com is a subscription website that features searchable original documents, providing users with an unaltered view of the events, places and people that shaped the American nation and the world. At Footnote.com, all are invited to come share, discuss, and collaborate on their discoveries with friends, family, and colleagues. For more information, visit www.footnote.com.

About The National Archives
NARA alone is the archives of the Government of the United States, responsible for safeguarding records of all three branches of the Federal Government. The records held by the National Archives belong to the public – and it is the mission of the National Archives to ensure the public can discover, use, and learn from the records of their government. 

NARA Contact:
The National Archives Public Affairs staff
 (202) 357-5300

Footnote.com Contact:
Justin Schroepfer
Marketing Director
(801) 494-6517
Justin@footnote.com

Footnote.com Releases African American Collection

Lindon, UT

THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND FOOTNOTE.COM LAUNCH ONLINE AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY COLLECTION
Over a million pages of original documents, letters and photos, most digitized for the first time.

Lindon, UT - January 29, 2009 – In celebration of Black History Month, Footnote.com is launching its African American Collection.  Footnote.com has been working with the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) in Washington, D.C., to digitize records that provide a view into the lives of African Americans that few have seen before.


“These records cover subjects including slavery, military service, and issues facing African Americans dating back to the late 18th century,” explains James Hastings, Director of Access Programs at NARA. “Making these records available online will help people to better understand the history and sacrifice that took place in this country.”


Footnote.com has spent the last two years with NARA compiling this collection and is currently working on adding more records that will be released in the upcoming months. African American records currently on Footnote.com include:


•    Service Records for Colored Troops in the Civil War – Records for the 2nd-13th infantries including enlistment papers, casualty sheets, oaths of allegiance, proof of ownership and bills of sale.
•    American Colonization Society – Letters and reports relating to this colony established in 1817 for free people of color residing in the U.S.
•    Amistad Case – Handwritten records of this landmark case beginning in 1839 involving the Spanish schooner Amistad, used to transport illegal slaves.
•    Southern Claims Commission – Petitions for compensation resulting from the Civil War.

“The Southern Claims Commission records are a very rich, often overlooked resource for African American family research. They often contain information that cannot be found anywhere else,” says Toni Carrier, Founding Director of the USF Africana Heritage Project. “These records document the experiences of former slaves during the Civil War and in the days immediately after. Many contain detailed narratives that make it possible for descendants to envision the lives and experiences of ancestors.”

Footnote.com is also working on additional record collections that will be released shortly. Those records include:


•    Records of the US District Court for the District of Columbia Relating to Slaves, 1851-1863 – includes slave schedules, manumission papers and case papers relating to fugitive slaves.
•    Records for the Emancipation of Slaves in the District of Columbia, 1862-63 – minutes of meetings, docket books and petitions pertaining to emancipation of slaves.
•    Registro Central de Esclavos 1872 (Slave Schedules) – registers from Puerto Rico giving information for each slave: name, country of origin, name of parents, physical description, master’s name and more.
•    Records Relating to the Suppression of the African Slave Trade and Negro Colonization, 1854-1872 - letters, accounts, and other documents relating to the suppression of the African slave trade.
•    Correspondence of the Military Intelligence Division Relation to “Negro Subversion” 1917-1941 - record cards and correspondence of the Military Intelligence Division (MID) that relate to activities of blacks in both civilian and military life.


In addition to these records, Footnote.com also features member contributions that include topics ranging from the Underground Railroad to Women Abolitionists to African Americans receiving the Congressional Medal of Honor. 


“The contributions to our site have been impressive,” says Russell Wilding, CEO of Footnote.com. “It’s exciting to see people connect with history and with each other.”

To view the African American Collection on Footnote.com visitors can go to http://go.footnote.com/blackhistory/. 

About Footnote, Inc.
Footnote.com is a subscription website that features searchable original documents, providing users with an unaltered view of the events, places and people that shaped the American nation and the world. At Footnote.com, all are invited to come share, discuss, and collaborate on their discoveries with friends, family, and colleagues. For more information, visit www.footnote.com.

About The National Archives
NARA alone is the archives of the Government of the United States, responsible for safeguarding records of all three branches of the Federal Government. The records held by the National Archives belong to the public – and it is the mission of the National Archives to ensure the public can discover, use, and learn from the records of their government. 

NARA Contact:
The National Archives Public Affairs staff
 (202) 357-5300


Footnote.com Contact:
Justin Schroepfer
Marketing Director
(801) 494-6517
Justin@footnote.com

FOOTNOTE.COM RELEASES GREAT DEPRESSION COLLECTION

Lindon, Utah

Collection includes the first-ever Interactive 1930 US Census, and becomes the gathering place for America’s story

Footnote.com, the premier history website for original content, announced today the launch of its Great Depression Collection, which provides unique insights into life’s struggles and the financial challenges Americans faced during the 1930s.
The Great Depression Collection includes millions of digitized and indexed documents including historical newspapers. Visitors to Footnote.com can view original pages featuring articles and advertisements that reveal fascinating details about what was happening in Washington, D.C., as well as in mainstream America.  Visitors can also read articles about Roosevelt’s New Deal or see how much groceries cost during the time of the Depression.
As part of this collection, Footnote.com is pleased to introduce the first ever Interactive 1930 US Census.  Footnote.com has combined innovative technology with the 1930 Census to create an interactive experience allowing members to contribute their own family photos, documents and stories by attaching them to the names on the census. 
“On Footnote.com, the 1930 Census is taking on a new role: a gathering place for the American story,” said Russ Wilding, CEO of Footnote.com. “Now all those stories that our parents and grandparents told us about the Depression have a place to come together and be preserved for future generations.”
 In addition to contributing to the census documents, members can automatically create Footnote Pages for any individual found in the census. Footnote Pages allow users to create:
•    Timelines
•    Photo galleries
•    Maps
•    Links to other Footnote Pages
These pages can serve as memorial pages, research pages, or simply a starting place where individual shoeboxes of memories and memorabilia can be uploaded. 
Footnote.com has successfully created a social framework around historical documents. Numerous people have already made hundreds of thousands of contributions on the site. “If you had family in America in 1930, you will most likely find them in the census,” continues Wilding. “We encourage all to come to Footnote.com and add your family story and preserve our nation’s heritage.”
To view the Great Depression Collection, including the Interactive 1930 US Census, please visit Footnote.com.

About Footnote, Inc.
Footnote.com is a subscription website that features searchable original documents, providing users with an unaltered view of the events, places and people that shaped the American nation and the world. At Footnote.com, all are invited to come share, discuss, and collaborate on their discoveries with friends, family, and colleagues. For more information, visit www.footnote.com.

Footnote.com Contact:
Justin Schroepfer
Marketing Director
(801) 494-6517
Justin@footnote.com


FOOTNOTE.COM LETS PEOPLE CREATE AMERICA’S FAMILY TREE THROUGH THEIR INTERACTIVE U.S. CENSUS

Lindon, UT

In order to encourage more people to find their ancestors and connect with family, Footnote.com, the web’s premier interactive history site, is opening all of their U.S. census documents for free to the public for a limited time.


Unlike any other historical collection on the web, the Interactive Census Collection has the unique ability to connect people related to ancestors found on the historical documents.  Simply by clicking the “I’m Related” button for a name on the document will identify you as a descendent and also list others that have done the same.  Never before has it been as easy to connect with distant relatives through historical documents. 

To learn how to get started with the Interactive Census, visit: http://go.footnote.com/discover.


Finding a record featuring an ancestor’s name provides not only an emotional experience but also a connection with the past.  On Footnote.com it’s more than just finding a name on a census record.  Interactive tools allow people to enhance the documents by adding their own contributions including:
•    Photos
•    Stories
•    Comments
•    Other related documents
Each contribution is linked to a Footnote member and provides a means for people to find each other and exchange more information about their ancestors.


“TV programs including ‘Who Do You Think You Are?’ on NBC and ‘Faces of America’ on PBS will surely increase the interest in family history in the United States,” explains Russell Wilding, CEO of Footnote.com.  “We believe that using our Interactive Census Collection is a great way for those who are new to genealogy to get started.”

In addition to providing the basic information about ancestors with the census documents, Footnote.com has been working with the National Archives and other institutions to digitize and index over 63 million historical records that include:
•    Military documents
•    Historical newspapers
•    City directories
•    Naturalization records

“Using the records on Footnote to go beyond the names and dates is like adding color to your tree,” says Roger Bell, Footnote’s Senior Vice President of Content and Product.  “The more details you add, the more colorful your family tree becomes.”
To search for an ancestor and experience family history like never before, visit: http://go.footnote.com/discover.

FOOTNOTE.COM LAUNCHES APPLICATION ON FACEBOOK® PLATFORM TO HELP FRIENDS REMEMBER FRIENDS

Lindon, UT

– Footnote.com today announced the launch of I Remember, a Facebook application aimed at helping connect Facebook users in order to share memories of loved ones. Few events in life generate the emotions and memories as does the passing of a friend, family member or colleague. However, without the appropriate tools and forum to preserve and share these memories, a loved one’s legacy may be lost. Now with I Remember, Facebook users can create a meaningful experience to honor those individuals that had an impact on their lives.
“A big challenge with gathering memories and stories together is getting everyone to contribute and share in one place,” explains Russell Wilding, CEO of Footnote.com. “Facebook helps eliminate that barrier by bringing millions of people together on a daily basis. The I Remember application simply leverages Facebook’s successful platform so friends and family can participate in remembering people that meant the most to them.” 
Using I Remember, Facebook users can share stories, upload photos, post comments and add facts about an individual. These facts will automatically generate a timeline of the individual’s life and a map detailing important places and events. Further, shared information will undoubtedly spark more memories. Soon a robust page can be created through the simple efforts of a few people coming together. For an example of an I Remember page, click here.
In addition, contributions using I Remember on Facebook will also be accessible on Footnote.com, a premier history website. From the I Remember pages on Facebook, users can easily tap into the over 53 million historical documents found on Footnote.com to discover additional information about those people they are remembering. 
To learn more about the I Remember application, go to http://go.footnote.com/iremember/

FOOTNOTE.COM OPENS INTERACTIVE 1930 US CENSUS FOR FREE TO THE PUBLIC

Lindon, UT

Footnote.com announced today that it is providing free access to the more than 123 million names from its Interactive 1930 US Census throughout the month of August.   
With Footnote.com’s interactive census users can view, download and print images from the census.  Visitors to the site can interact with the site and other users to share images, add comments, spotlight interesting finds, create pages for ancestors and tell their stories.  To learn more about how the census experience on Footnote.com is unique visit the company’s Web site.
“The 1930 Census is one of the most powerful resources available to anyone who wants to learn more about their ancestors,” said Russell Wilding, CEO of Footnote.com.  “At Footnote.com we’ve created an interactive site where more pieces to the puzzle can come together.  For history buffs and genealogists it’s all about connecting the dots and gathering more puzzle pieces.  The more puzzle pieces you have, the more detailed the picture will become.”
Some of the information contained about individuals in the 1930 US Census includes:
•    Where they lived
•    Who they lived with
•    When and where they were born
•    What they did for a living
Visitors to the Footnote.com Web site can access the Interactive 1930 US census for free today.

Gannett Digital Media Network Partners with Footnote.com to Launch HistoryBeat.com Websites

McLean, VA

Gannett Digital Media Network, a division of Gannett Co., Inc. (NYSE: GCI) that ties together more than 100 digital communities with a combined reach of approximately 25 million people, today announced a partnership with Footnote.com, the premier history website for original content, to launch HistoryBeat.com, a website that combines social networking with archival photos and original newspaper coverage of historical events. The first sites under the HistoryBeat domain, moonlanding.historybeat.com and woodstock.historybeat.com, honor the 40th anniversary of two significant American events: the Apollo Moon Landing and the Woodstock Music Festival.

The HistoryBeat.com sites enable users to view a vast amount of first-hand local journalism from Gannett newspapers that originally covered the Apollo Moon Landing and the Woodstock Music Festival. The newly-available information includes hundreds of photos and materials that were previously unpublished or unseen for nearly 40 years. The HistoryBeat.com sites create social communities where users can interact and share content related to these historical events. Users can register and create personal profiles in order to add annotations and comments, and even upload their own photos and documents. Comments and chat features are available for registered users to share their stories and experiences of these events as well as through Facebook, Twitter and other social bookmarks. Footnote.com provides the platform to support these extensive archives to the general public, while Gannett provides the historical context and content.

“HistoryBeat.com not only makes this historical content available online, but allows people to see the impact of these events on American progress and culture by engaging via social networking tools and features,” said Jennifer Carroll, vice president and senior editor at Gannett’s Content One. “By providing unique opportunities for audiences to interact and form deeper relationships with the content online, we’re encouraging viewers to go beyond the documented news and add their unique perspectives on these two nationally defining events.”

HistoryBeat.com makes available relevant articles from Florida Today for the Moon Landing and the Poughkeepsie Journal for Woodstock, as well as additional material such as official releases, artwork, and videos. Users can also search for relevant documents and images, including over 1,800 previously unpublished photos of the Apollo Moon Landing taken by Florida Today.

“By partnering with Gannett Digital Media Network, we're thrilled to take these stories from the archives and share them with everyone who was affected by the Apollo Moon Landing and the Woodstock Music Festival,” said Russ Wilding, CEO of Footnote.com. “This innovative way of presenting, sharing and interacting with news and first-person stories creates opportunities to expand our understanding of these important happenings.”

Footnote.com Opens The Largest Online U.S. Civil War Collection Free To The Public

Lindon, UT

June 10, 2010 – Lindon, UT – Today Footnote.com announced that its U.S. Civil War Collection will be made free to the public through the month of June.  Footnote.com has worked with the U.S. National Archives over the past three years to create the largest repository of Civil War documents on the web featuring over 30 million documents, photos and maps. 


“Our strong partnership with the National Archives has allowed us to build an extremely valuable resource for researchers, historians and genealogists,” explains Russell Wilding, CEO of Footnote.com.  “Now more people than ever have access to records relating to one of the most prolific events in our history.”


The original documents found in this collection provide a different perspective on the “war between the states.”  Major events as well as accounts from individuals are brought to life on Footnote.com. Visitors to Footnote.com will find:
•    Union and Confederate Soldier Service Records
•    Widow’s Pension Files
•    Emancipation Documents and Slave Records
•    Confederate Amnesty Papers and Citizens Files
•    Lincoln Assassination Investigation and Trial Papers
•    U.S. Civil War Photos and Maps

More than just a repository, Footnote.com incorporates community contributions and interactions to enhance these records. “When documents and member contributions come together, a more powerful side of history is revealed,” says Justin Schroepfer Director of Marketing at Footnote.com.  “Our members have added comments, insights and information that significantly increase our understanding of these events and the people involved.”


On Footnote.com members can also create their own pages to highlight their discoveries and research.  Members have created Footnote Pages relating to the U.S. Civil War that cover topics such as:
•    Female Civil War Soldiers & Spies
•    Papers of Robert E. Lee
•    Union African Americans in the U.S. Civil War
•    Confederate Soldiers Graves
To see how Footnote.com is changing the way we view U.S. Civil War history, visit http://go.footnote.com/civilwar/.

Footnote.com Will Be the First Online Home of the Digital Pension Applications

 

iArchives Announces Collaboration With the Federation of Genealogical Societies to Digitize 7.2 Million Pages of Pension Applications From the War of 1812

Footnote.com Will Be the First Online Home of the Digital Pension Applications

 

LINDON, UT–(Marketwire – April 12, 2011) – iArchives today announced a collaboration with the Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS) to digitize 180,000 pension applications, or an estimated 7.2 million pages of War of 1812 Pension and Bounty Land Warrant Application Files. The collection will be available on iArchives’ military records website, Footnote.com, home of more than 72 million historical records.

The multi-year project will consist of scanning the pension files at the National Archives in Washington D.C. and creating a searchable index to the digital images. FGS has targeted the War of 1812 Pension Applications as a high priority project based on the value of the content for genealogists as well as the importance of preserving the fragile records.

“Our goal with any collaboration is to honor our nation’s heritage by preserving the records of our past,” said Patricia Oxley, President of FGS. “In the specific case of the War of 1812 pension records, there is an added priority due to their frail state where not acting may mean sacrificing these for future generations.”

With the burden of proof on the applicant to qualify for a pension, those applying proved participation in the war by including dozens of vividly descriptive pages. Details recorded include military battle stories, service dates, mentions of fellow soldiers, family relations, marriages, widows’ maiden names and many other clues significant to researchers. The breadth of information allows the pension files to tell the richest story of that time period.

“The most popular database on Footnote.com today is the Revolutionary War Pensions which is very similar content,” said Brian Hansen, General Manager at Footnote.com. “Our users have been asking for the War of 1812 pension records for some time, and I expect this collection to be very popular based on the rich war time detail it contains. We are pleased to make these records available for free on Footnote.com as a result of FGS fundraising efforts to subsidize the production cost.”

FGS is proud to be leading the national fundraising to support this project and is actively seeking donations from genealogical and historical societies, patriotic and military heritage societies, as well as interested corporations and individuals. iArchives is providing a dollar-for-dollar match of each donation through a provision of services. To learn more and contribute to the project, visit www.fgs.org/1812.

About iArchives
iArchives is a leading digitization service provider and subsidiary of Ancestry.com (NASDAQ: ACOM). The company operates Footnote.com, the leading U.S. military record resource on the web with more than 72 million records online. The site provides searchable original documents, providing subscribers with a view of the events, places and people in the conflicts that shaped the American nation and the world. For more information, visit www.footnote.com.

About FGS
The Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS), founded in 1976, links the genealogical community by serving the needs of its member societies, providing products and services needed by member societies, and marshaling the resources of its member organizations. FGS represents the members of hundreds of genealogical societies and engages in projects that help genealogical societies strengthen and grow as well as call attention to records preservation and access issues. FGS can be found on the web at www.FGS.org.

 

Footnote.com Publishes First Digital Versions of War of 1812 Pension Application Files

Lindon, UT

Collaboration with Federation of Genealogical Societies and the National Archives Offers Free Online Access to Records

Lindon, UT (May 10, 2011) – Footnote.com is pleased to announce the first online publishing of the War of 1812 Pension and Bounty Land Warrant Applications. In cooperation with the Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS) and the National Archives, Footnote.com is currently digitizing millions of War of 1812 records and making them available on its site free of charge. The initial 1,400 images are available today and the collection will continue to grow weekly as the digitization process progresses. When completed, the collection will encompass 7.2 million images that will detail the histories of soldiers who fought in the War of 1812 and their families.

While the project is currently underway, its long term completion is dependent on the availability of additional funding. FGS is proud to be spearheading a national fundraising effort to ensure the completion and expedite this valuable endeavor. The organization is actively seeking donations from genealogical and historical societies, patriotic and military heritage societies, and any interested corporations or individuals. iArchives, Footnote.com’s parent company, is providing a dollar-for-dollar match of each donation through a provision of services. To learn more and contribute to the project, visit www.fgs.org/1812 or www.footnote.com/1812pensions.

“This is just the first step in a multi-year journey to bring the War of 1812 documents out of the National Archives and into the digital world,” said Brian Hansen, General Manager of Footnote.com. “We are privileged to bring such historically rich documents online, so they can be accessed in schools, libraries and homes where they can be available free for future generations.”

Footnote.com’s database of Revolutionary War Pension Files has proven to be the most popular set of records available on the site. It is anticipated that the War of 1812 Pension Application Files will create similar interest from family historians, genealogists and military researchers. The War of 1812 Pension Application Files include extensive details of the lives of these 19th century veterans. The information may include:

 

·        Veteran’s name

·        Widow’s name

·        Widow’s maiden name

·        Service data and dates

·        Age

·        Acres Granted

·        Year of Bureau of Land Management act

·        Soldier death date

·        Warrant number

·        Place of residence

·        Organization and Rank

·        Marriage date

·        Widow death date

·        Additional names

 

 

About iArchives

iArchives is a leading digitization service provider and subsidiary of Ancestry.com (NASDAQ: ACOM). The company operates Footnote.com, the leading U.S. military record resource on the web with more than 72 million records online. The site provides searchable original documents, providing subscribers with a view of the events, places and people in the conflicts that shaped the American nation and the world. For more information, visit www.footnote.com.

 

 

About FGS

The Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS), founded in 1976, links the genealogical community by serving the needs of its member societies, providing products and services needed by member societies, and marshaling the resources of its member organizations. FGS represents the members of hundreds of genealogical societies and engages in projects that help genealogical societies strengthen and grow as well as call attention to records preservation and access issues. FGS can be found on the web at www.FGS.org.

 

About the National Archives
The National Archives and Records Administration, an independent federal agency, is the nation's record keeper. Founded in 1934, its mission is unique -- to serve American democracy by safeguarding and preserving the records of our Government, ensuring that the people can discover, use, and learn from this documentary heritage. The National Archives ensures continuing access to the essential documentation of the rights of American citizens and the actions of their government. It supports democracy, promotes civic education, and facilitates historical understanding of our national experience. The National Archives meets a wide range of information needs, among them helping people to trace their families' history, making it possible for veterans to prove their entitlement to medical and other benefits, and preserving original White House records. The National Archives carries out its mission through a nationwide network of archives, records centers, and Presidential Libraries, and on the Internet at http://www.archives.gov/.

 

For further information, contact:

Footnote.com:

Matthew Deighton

Public Relations

 

Press@footnote.com

 

Footnote.com Announces New Focus on Historical U.S. Military Records and Changes Name to Fold3

Lindon, UT

New Brand will Honor and Remember those who have Served  

Footnote.com, a premier destination for discovering family history records, today announced it will now focus primarily on offering the finest and most comprehensive collection of U.S. Military records available on the internet.  The site gathers the most valuable U.S. military records, photos and stories to help family historians and others discover and share the memories of those who served.

As part of this new focus, the name of the site will change from Footnote to Fold3.  The Fold3 name is derived from the third fold in a traditional military flag folding ceremony which “is made in honor and remembrance of the veteran departing our ranks who gave a portion of his or her life for the defense of our country to attain peace throughout the world.” 

Fold3 is the web’s premier collection and destination for original U.S. military records, helping people find and share more than 74 million images of historical documents and photos. These records include valuable collections from the Revolutionary War, War of 1812, Civil War, World Wars I and II and America’s more recent engagements in Vietnam and elsewhere.  Specializing in digitization of paper, microfilm and microfiche collections, Fold3 brings many never-before-seen historic documents to the web through patented processes and unique partnerships with The National Archives and other institutions. This combination of innovative technology and access to strategic partners provides subscribers with an easy way to search original documents and discover stories about the people, places and events in the conflicts that shaped America and the world.

“We have already begun expanding Fold3’s robust military collection to include new pension application files and draft cards,” said Brian Hansen, General Manager of Fold3.  “It’s truly gratifying to help researchers easily discover at home what they previously could find only by traveling to an archive.”

Fold3’s significant collections illuminate history that was once hidden. For example, Fold3’s World War II photos, Missing Air Crew Reports and JAG case files include detailed information about the ordeal of Louis Zamperini, subject of the New York Times Best Seller, Unbroken.  Similar stories about millions of service men and women lie undiscovered within the records available on Fold3.

Fold3 will continue to operate as a subsidiary of Ancestry.com, the world's largest online family history resource, which acquired Fold3 as part of its purchase of iArchives in 2010. In addition to connecting more closely to its military collection, the rebranding helps distinguish Fold3’s value as a highly complementary brand to Ancestry.com. Many family historians and genealogists may use Ancestry.com to find an ancestor who served in the military and then use Fold3 to discover the details of their service.

To begin searching for your family’s military history, go to www.fold3.com .

About Fold3 (www.fold3.com)

Fold3 offers the web’s premier collection of original military records, gathering the best U.S. military records, photos and stories to help customers discover and share the stories of those who served.  With more than 74 million historical record images already online and more being added every day, Fold3 brings the details of America’s military service to life.

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