Pictures & Records (26)

FH-FAMD-017a L to R -- Annie's Mother Ada Burbidge (Walk), Annie E. Walk (Miles), and Annie's Son Henry Lee Miles 1904.jpg
FH-FAMD-017a L to R -- Annie's Mother Ada Burbidge (Walk), Annie E. Walk (Miles), and Annie's Son Henry Lee Miles 1904.jpg
FH-FAMD-085a Portrait Pedigree of the Progenitors of Flora Annie Miles (Duncan) 1750 to 1950.jpg
FH-FAMD-085a Portrait Pedigree of the Progenitors of Flora Annie Miles (Duncan) 1750 to 1950.jpg
FH-FAMD-092a Henry Joseph Walk & Ada Elizabeth Burbidge Family Group Sheet 1854 - 1930.jpg
FH-FAMD-092a Henry Joseph Walk & Ada Elizabeth Burbidge Family Group Sheet 1854 - 1930.jpg
FH-FAMD-016b Henry Joseph Walk Age 60 (Born 10 Dec 1854) -- Father of Annie Elizabeth Walk -- 1914.jpg
FH-FAMD-016b Henry Joseph Walk Age 60 (Born 10 Dec 1854) -- Father of Annie Elizabeth Walk -- 1914.jpg
FH-FAMD-054d Samuel Sampson Miles -- Jun 1914.jpg
FH-FAMD-054d Samuel Sampson Miles -- Jun 1914.jpg
FH-FAMD-054e Annie Elizabeth Walk (Miles) -- Jun 1914.jpg
FH-FAMD-054e Annie Elizabeth Walk (Miles) -- Jun 1914.jpg
4 generations -- Henry Joseph Walk Descendants
4 generations -- Henry Joseph Walk Descendants
Center to Right: Henry Joseph Walk, Annie E. Walk (Miles), Henry Lee Miles, Flora Annie Miles (Duncan)
Annie E. Walks Family by Husband Samuel S. Miles
Annie E. Walks Family by Husband Samuel S. Miles
Samuel Sampson Miles & Annie Elizabeth Walk (Miles) & their Family -- June 1914
Annie's Husband is Expert Horseman
Annie's Husband is Expert Horseman
Annie's Husband Samuel S. Miles with hia Horse, Tooele Utah 1923
Search Party Members -- Annie who had the vision, Oldest Son Henry, & Samuel
Search Party Members -- Annie who had the vision, Oldest Son Henry, & Samuel
This picture taken in 1918 shows the people in the search party who discovered the dead body of Marion Tanner, according to the visions that Annie had of the exact location of the body. 300 men searching for a month could not find the body, but Annie's search team of 3 went directly to the location.
Search Party Member, Samuel S. Miles with his horse -- 1923
Search Party Member, Samuel S. Miles with his horse -- 1923
Marion Tanner's dead body was found with the aid of horses who carried the searches to the location that Annie saw in her dreams.
Annie Elizabeth Walk (Miles) Obituary -- 30 Nov 1963
Annie Elizabeth Walk (Miles) Obituary -- 30 Nov 1963
Died in Tooele, Utah. As of 1963, descendants included 20 grandchildren and 49 great-grandchildren
Four Generations of Miles Descendants -- 1948
Four Generations of Miles Descendants -- 1948
Rear -- George L Miles, Henry L. Miles, Samuel S. Miles Front -- George L. Miles Jr
Annie Elizabeth Walk (Miles) Family in 1930
Annie Elizabeth Walk (Miles) Family in 1930
Annie Elizabeth Walk (Miles) & Samuel S. Miles with their family in March 1930
Samuel Sampson Miles about 1950
Samuel Sampson Miles about 1950
50 Years Wedding Anniversary -- 24 Apr 1951
50 Years Wedding Anniversary -- 24 Apr 1951
Samuel S. Miles & Annie E. Walk (Miles) -- Golden 50th Wedding Anniversary
60 Years Wedding Anniversary -- 24 Apr 1961
60 Years Wedding Anniversary -- 24 Apr 1961
Samuel S. Miles & Annie E. Walk (Miles) -- Diamond 60th Wedding Anniversary
Newspaper Clipping -- 60th Wedding Anniversary
Newspaper Clipping -- 60th Wedding Anniversary
Samuel S. Miles & Annie E. Walk (Miles) -- 24 Apr 1961
50th Wedding Aniversary -- 24 April 1951
50th Wedding Aniversary -- 24 April 1951
Samuel Sampson Miles & Annie Elizabeth Walk (Miles) at 50th Golden Wedding Aniversary
50th Wedding Anniversary -- 24 April 1951
50th Wedding Anniversary -- 24 April 1951
Samuel Sampson Miles & Annie Elizabeth Walk (Miles) at 50th Golden Wedding Anniversary
Annie Walk Miles at Age 71 -- Oct 1950
Annie Walk Miles at Age 71 -- Oct 1950
Baby at 1 month old is Rebecca Duncan (Levanger); Infant at 18 months is Stephanie Duncan (Taylor)
Few of the Great Grandchildren of Annie Walk Miles -- 1954
Few of the Great Grandchildren of Annie Walk Miles -- 1954
Annie E. Walk Miles & Samuel Samson Miles -- Third generation descendants
Samuel S. Miles & Annie E. Walk (Miles) Family Group Sheet -- 1902 to 1921
Samuel S. Miles & Annie E. Walk (Miles) Family Group Sheet -- 1902 to 1921
Eight Children in the family
Henry Joseph Walk & Ada Elizabeth Burbidge Family Group Sheet 1854 to 1930
Henry Joseph Walk & Ada Elizabeth Burbidge Family Group Sheet 1854 to 1930
Henry J. Walk had 14 children by first wife Ada Elizabeth Burbidge
Henry Joseph Walk & Lydia Elizabeth Smith Family Group Sheet -- 1854 to 1930
Henry Joseph Walk & Lydia Elizabeth Smith Family Group Sheet -- 1854 to 1930
Henry J. Walk had 7 children by second wife Lydia Elizabeth Smith
Center standing is Annie Elizabeth Walk (Miles) -- Central person of this story, 1904
Center standing is Annie Elizabeth Walk (Miles) -- Central person of this story, 1904
Date of this picture is 1904. Left to Right: Annie's Mother Ada Burbidge (Walk) who is seated, Annie Elizabeth Walk (Miles) who is standing, and Annie's first-born Son, Henry Lee Miles at age 2 years.
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Emigration to Utah: Zion, Pure in Heart

Andover, Hampshire, England

FH-FAMD-017a L to R -- Annie's Mother Ada Burbidge (Walk), Annie E. Walk (Miles), and Annie's Son Henry Lee Miles 1904.jpg
2 images

Annie Elizabeth Walk (Miles) was born 02 Nov 1879 at Andover, Hampshire, England, the third child of Henry Joseph Walk and Ada Elizabeth Burbidge.  Her grandparents were Joseph Walk and Harriet Ann Franklin (Walk) and Charles Mann and Fanny Hammond Burbidge (Mann).  A short one-generation genealogy of her brothers and sisters, along with a short one-generation genealogy of her own children is given at the end of this account.

 Annie Elizabeth Walk (Miles’) parents were converted to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (LDS Church, Mormon) and were baptized on 04 Jul 1880.  They soon made preparations to come to Utah, the gathering place of the faithful Latter-day Saints, and home to the pure-in-heart seeking Zion.  They set sail on 06 Jul 1881 and arrived in Salt Lake City on 02 Sep 1881.  While crossing the ocean, Annie’s mother Ada took very ill.  She was bedridden during the entire voyage and had to be carried off the ship when it docked.  Her father took a job helping the baker on the ship so that her mother could have better food.  Annie and her brother Henry were left to the care of the missionaries on board the ship.  She had some of her first experiences of caring for herself at this early age (of just under 2 years old).  After reaching Salt Lake City, they moved for a short time to Lake Point in Tooele County, Utah with her mother’s Uncle, William Hammond.

Soon after, the Walk family moved to Salt Lake City, where they lived in the Second Ward near a match factory.  A “ward” in the LDS Church is an organizational unit with about 200 members in the same general geographic area.  At the time her brother Joseph was born in May 1883, the match factory burned down.  The men who came to extinguish the fire took the blankets off her mother’s bed and put them on the roof to keep the house from burning.  They carried the water up ladders and poured it on the blankets.  The sight of a raging fire next to her home must have made a deep impression on Annie, who was only 3 and one half years old at the time.

The Walk family made their next move to the Wilford Woodruff home near the graveyard in Salt Lake City shortly thereafter.  Annie recalls watching the burial of a Chinaman.  It amused her to see pans of rice and chicken placed by the side of the dead man, so that he would not get hungry on the way to heaven, according to the oriental traditions.  While she was living in this place, she used to save all her nickels to ride the mule car down town.  John, the driver would let her drive the horses back.  This was a stroke of good luck, since horses would later play a major role in her life as she was growing up and preparing for marriage.

The Walk family then moved next to a place on the Brighton Flats, which her father purchased without seeing it at all.  This was the first home that the family purchased.  The first night after they moved into the new home was a night of miserable weather, a snow storm in fact.  And the house was not finished, for there was no roof at all.  Annie’s mother tried to protect her infants by tying quilts to the bed posts to keep the snow off her two children.  Her mother got up several times during the night to shake off the snow so that the children would not get cold.  On the next night, the neighbors came and held a welcome party.  That same evening, the family horse ran away and Annie’s father had to walk five miles to work the next morning!

After they moved into their new home, her father would get large logs from City Creek for fire wood.  She and her mother would saw up the logs into stove-length pieces every night just before sundown -- except on their Sunday day-of-rest.

City Creek is described here:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/City_Creek_(Salt_Lake_City)

The first picture of this chapter is a photograph taken approx 1904.  The three people in the picture are (PICTURE LEFTMOST PERSON) Annie’s mother, Ada Burbidge [Walk] age 45 who emigrated to LDS Mormon Zion in Salt City, Utah, with her husband Henry Joseph Walk age 49 and her daughter Annie age 2 almost, (PICTURE CENTER PERSON) Annie herself -- Annie Elizabeth Walk [Miles] -- age 25 years, and (PICTURE RIGHTMOST PERSON) Annie’s oldest son, Henry Lee Miles age 2 -- who is the father of the author of this story you are reading right now.

The second picture of this chapter is a Portrait Pedigree photo showing the ancestors of the author of this story, Flora Annie Miles (Duncan) leftmost in the pedigree.  The relationship of Annie Elizabeth Walk (Miles) as paternal grandmother to author Flora (leftmost) is clearly illustrated. 

Fireworks, School, Poem Recitation, Indians

Salt Lake City, Utah (Brighton Flats)

FH-FAMD-092a Henry Joseph Walk & Ada Elizabeth Burbidge Family Group Sheet 1854 - 1930.jpg

When she was nine years and three months old, Annie was baptized to become a full-fledged member of the LDS Church that had brought her and her parents to Zion in Utah.

One of Annie’s daily duties was to go on the family horse with her father to work, and then to drive the horse back home.  In crossing the Jordon River one day after leaving her father at work, the horse started downstream.  One of the men called to her and told her to pull the line.  Whenever she went again, one of the men working on the bridge would drive the horse across the river for her.  Who would think of a 4-year old pre-school child driving a horse alone today?

On one of the 24th of July Pioneer-Day celebrations, Annie’s father bought the children some fire crackers and a box of matches while they were out for a picnic at Garfield Beach.  When she stooped down to light her fire crackers, somehow the five bunches of firecrackers all started to go off at the same time and set her clothing afire.  A man nearby tore her dress and apron off, but her eyebrows, eyelashes, and hair in front were burned.  Losing her pretty apron and having to go home without a dress made her very unhappy. 

When Annie started school, she had to go a mile and one- fourth.  Since she was quite small, one of the big boys would carry her on his back.  His name was Hunting.  She recalls that during the winter, everyone would get so wet that the teacher would have them take off their shoes and stockings and hang them to dry.  Annie’s mother gave her children an extra pair of stockings to put on.  It seems that the children those days didn’t get sick like they do now, when exposed to the weather.

The children’s first Sunday school lessons were from the day readers.  The children who were too small to read were shown Bible pictures.  Annie’s father would take the whole family to church in a light wagon.  They took their own lunch which consisted of sausage rolls and cake or cookies.  Annie always enjoyed Sunday school and anticipated it from one week to the next, because she could see all her school friends and play with them between Sunday school and Sunday meeting time.  In fact, school during the week was held in the Church meeting house.

When Annie was about eight years old, she bad to recite the following poetry piece in Sunday school:

Two little girls are better than one.

Two little boys double the fun.

Two little birds build a fine nest.

Two little arms love Mama the best.

One day on the way home from Sunday school, she saw something shining in the City Creek as she crossed it.  When she bent down to pull out the object, she cut the end of her thumb quite badly.  Her mother repaired the damage so well that it left only a scar on her injured thumb.  The sight of gushing blood can be a terrifying experience for a child -- unless mother is there to fix up your wound.

At the age of 12 years old, Annie went out to work for the first time.  She was working to earn income to help sustain a family of eighteen, which included her parents, brothers and sisters, grandparents, aunts, and uncles.  For her work, she had to scrub floors and wash dishes.  And she had to go a mile to carry a gallon of milk in one band and a basket of bread and cakes in the other hand.

When Annie was about thirteen, she went to see how the Indians cook their dinner.  They cooked a chicken, feathers and all, never bothering to pluck it.  When the Indians pulled the chicken out of the large kettle, Annie said, “Oh!” in surprise.  In response to this exclamation from her, one of the old Indians picked up a large knife and started to chase her.  As Annie was running away, headed for home, she saw a man pass by, and she was sure that he took care of the Indian, since she made it home safely.  After that incident, Annie was always afraid of Indians.  She was most likely unaware that the chasing was done in fun to tease her and to amuse the others around the kettle who were bored while doing nothing but watching the kettle boil.

The picture of this chapter shows the family group sheet of Annie’s parents, with Annie being the third child born 02 Nov 1879.   Annie’s brothers and sisters born to Annie’s mother, Ada Elizabeth Burbidge (Walk), are listed.

Polygamy, Cooking, Haying, Baking, Swimming, Sewing, Chores

Salt Lake City, Utah (Brighton Flats)

FH-FAMD-016b Henry Joseph Walk Age 60 (Born 10 Dec 1854) -- Father of Annie Elizabeth Walk -- 1914.jpg

During polygamist times, Annie and her brothers and sisters were taught that they should never reveal their name or where they lived, when asked by a stranger.  One day, while she and her brother Henry were herding a bunch of ewe sheep, a man came along and asked them their name and where they lived.  They said that they didn’t know.  The next day, the man went into Z.C.M.I. and asked their father it the children belonged to him.  The man making inquiry was testing the children.  The man said that he thought they were very well trained children, and as a reward, he bought them a large sack of candy.

Sometimes the Walk family would take care of polygamist women in need.  Annie remembers that on some nights, there were as many as three or four polygamist women at her home.  Her father did not practice polygamy, but his home was open to those who were being troubled because of it.

When Annie was fourteen, she earned enough to pay for all her own clothes.  Plus, she also worked for other people at no charge, just to be industrious and help them out.  One day, she cooked supper for a sick lady and her husband.  When she refused to accept any pay, the man of the house said that he would repay her sometime.  After Annie was married, the very same man was hired to plaster her house, and did the job for $10.00 less than he usually charged.  Annie considered that she had been well paid for cooking his supper years back, since $10 was a huge amount of money at that time.  For example, in the year 2010, a Morgan Silver Dollar in poor condition, circulated between the years 1878 to 1904, was listed for a public sales price of $36.95.  Ten dollars in silver ($10) at Annie’s time in the early 1900s would then be worth over $300 in year-2010 money.  And cooking dinner for $300 would be unthinkable.  Yet that was the surprise reward that Annie received for her generosity of cooking dinner for free for a sick lady and her husband.

One day, Annie was helping her father haul hay.  Suddenly the load tipped over on top of her when the wagon was going through a ditch.  She fell down along side of the ditch covered with hay, but got enough air to breathe so she didn’t suffocate to death.  Her father was terribly worried and called to her while be pitched hay as fast as he could trying to find Annie underneath the heavy load of hay.  He was working so fast, that she was afraid that he would stick her with the pitch fork.  When she crawled out, he sat down exhausted but thankful.  Annie’s fear of being stuck with the pitch fork was greater than that of being smothered, and she made her escape without being pierced by her dad’s frenzied digging for her in the toppled load of hay.

About this time at age 14, the family moved from Brighton Flats closer to central Salt Lake City, where her father worked at the Globe bakery and lunch room.  She worked with her Aunt Lilly in the lunch room.  While in this place, the family home in Brighton burned down and a new home had to be built.  After the new home was built, the family moved into their new home and operated a bakery in Brighton.  She and her brother Henry would sell doughnuts to the skaters on the White Lake.  Annie also had to milk the cows and wear boots where White Lake ran over the levy, near where the Surplus canal now runs.   

Annie’s brother went to Canada to help put the Alberta canal through and left the chores to her.  That is why she was milking the cows.  And Annie said that she milked some of the meanest cows in the world!  She also helped kill a beef cow, and she did other jobs more suitable for men.  She told her father she should have been a boy.

One day, when Annie was riding her horse, the horse took off out of control  -- which in those times was called “a runaway.”  The train was coming and she got excited and pulled the right line and turned the horse down the side of the track.  She walked two blocks home and fell unconscious after she reached the gate.  She remembered that scary incident well, since a runaway horse can trip and fall, killing the rider, or throwing the rider to his/her death.

One night, Annie and her brother Henry were sent after the cows.  On the way, they saw what they thought was a beautiful cat.  They decided to catch it and take it home.  They chased it for about a mile.  When it ran into the canal, it started to stink, so she picked up a rock and killed it.  She felt badly about killing such a pretty cat.  When they got home, their mother smelling them ‘from afar’ met them outside with orders to undress in the shanty and bathe before they came into the house.  It wasn’t a very pleasant experience for a cool night to be bathing in cold water and smelling of skunk scent.

Evan Stephens was a Gospel choir director who trained children to sing for meetings in the Salt Lake Church Tabernacle.  There were 1200 children selected to sing, and she was one of those children selected.  She was proud to contribute her voice to the children’s choir, and even received a picture of the singing group as a momento.

Annie never learned to swim, but she could stay afloat by treading water with her hands and feet.  One time, she saved the life of a little girl from drowning in the Surplus canal.  Another time, she saved a little boy from drowning at the springs on north second west in Salt Lake.  However, rather than a grateful thank you for her brave deed, she got a bad 'cussing' instead.  Annie had saved the boy just when he was going down for the third time.  When the boy’s father scolded her, another boy said, “Don’t scold her; she was good.  She saved Lawrence Dixon from drowning by rolling him on her lap to get the water out of his lungs.”

When Annie was sixteen, her father sent her out to learn dress making.  At one place where she worked, she made opera gowns and fancy dresses for streetwalkers.  Every time she wanted to quit, the boss would raise her wages.  She was making $18.50 a week when the boss asked her to go to work for him in Montana where he was moving the business.  The boss offered to pay two of the girls $20 a week, with free board, and with all expenses paid.  Annie’s parents refused to let her go.  The other girl went but was never heard from after that.

Annie did not have a complete year of school after she finished the seventh grade -- when she was eighteen years old.  Getting education beyond elementary school in the early 1900s was optional.  And many teenage children had to work to support their parents’ large families.  So it was with Annie.

The picture of this chapter, which was taken in 1904, shows Annie’s father, Henry Joseph Walk at age 49.

Meeting Her Fiancé, Horseback Riding, Sitting with the Colored Folks

Salt Lake City, Utah (Brighton Flats)

FH-FAMD-054d Samuel Sampson Miles -- Jun 1914.jpg
2 images

One election night, she and her girl friend went into Salt Lake in an old cart that had no bottom in it.  They rode up Main Street and back home again. They had a good time and everyone who saw them laughed.  When she was out riding in this cart, her future husband, Samuel Sampson Miles, gave her his picture.  That was a memorable experience for her, to meet a young man in this way, unaware that Samuel would become her future husband.

Another time, the two girls wanted to ride the stallion that belonged to her friend’s brother.  They took the horse and rode about an hour before the brother came after them as fast as be could and scolded them for taking the horse.  They had their fun but didn’t realize that they could have had bad trouble with the horse, especially if it became a runaway due to strange girls riding crazy on the steed.  Annie’s father reprimanded her too, which she remembers well.

One day, Annie’s mother told her that she could go for a horse back ride, and to make sure that all the other children got a ride too.  All five of the children got on the horse, with her brother Henry on first; the younger children in the middle, and her on the back.  When they were going across a ditch, and going up the bank on the other side, she fell off into the water along with the other three younger children.  Henry was the only one who didn’t get an extra bath in the ditch that day.

One evening, a few of the children, including Annie, went to the Salt Lake Theater.  They began daring each other about whether or not they would go up into the balcony where the colored people sat.  They did indeed decide to go up to the balcony, and also decided that they would keep it a secret and not tell their parent folks.  But Henry told his father, and that was the last show the children saw with money that their father gave them.

The first picture in this chapter are of Annie’s husband, Samuel Sampson Miles, taken June 1914, when Samuel was 38 years of age.   The second picture shows  Annie in June 1914, when Annie is 35 years old.

Courtship, Wedding, Children

Salt Lake City, Utah

4 generations -- Henry Joseph Walk Descendants
3 images

A few months prior to her marriage to Samuel Miles, Annie was sitting by the table when her mother told her to move away from the table.  When she didn’t move right away, her mother told her again to move.  Just as she moved passed the end of the table, a large piece of the plaster ceiling fell down and struck the table where she had been sitting.  The plaster went through the table down to the floor.  No one expected this to happen, but her mother had a feeling of danger, and that feeling of danger led her to issue the warning.  The family had to have a new table before they could continue eating their supper.

During their courtship, Annie and Samuel were not together very often, since her intended was away most of the time working.  The one time they were together for any length of time was when they went to Idaho to look at some land.  Annie went on the trip to Idaho with her fiancé Samuel, Samuel’s mother, Samuel’s sister, Samuel’s brother, and Samuel’s brother’s fiancé -- all of them together in a covered wagon.  The two boys did the driving.

The party of six were a week on the road each way.  At night, they would sit by the fire and watch the last coals die before they went to bed.  The four women slept in the wagon and the two boys slept under the wagon.  They camped where they could find water and get hay for the horses.  One night they decided to go for a walk.  They camped close by an old mill that night.  The first couple started ahead, and after they got back to camp, they found that the other couple had sat on the opposite corner of the mill from them.  Interpretation:  The two couples had not gone for a walk at all that evening, but instead spent time doing whatever couples do when alone courting, hidden from view in the dark, at the opposite corners of the mill -- which was forbidden, of course!

During the 14 day round-trip to Idaho and back, the party of six cooked their meals by the side of the road.  And if they got a little dirt as a substitute for pepper seasoning on their food, they ate their food just the same.  They drank water that was so full of mud that it had to stand a while to let the mud settle to the bottom of the pan.

The first time Annie remembers having seen the man she was going to marry was at school when they were young.  One day she saw him crying, which touched her heart, and which she remembered all her life.

Grandfather bought a cow from her father, and the day that he came to pay for the cow was the day that they started to go together, Annie and Samuel.  Annie’s brother liked to tease her about this event, and told her that her father had thrown her in on the bargain to pay for the cow.  That was in February 1900, about 14 months before they were married in April 1901.

When Annie was married, her brother Joe, being full of fun, had some of his friends change the wheels on the buggy, interchanging the front wheels with the back wheels.  Before they could go home, Grandpa had to get a wrench to put the wheels on right.  Now that buggy days are long past, it might be well to mention that the buggy wheels are larger on the back than on the front, so the buggy was not useable unless the wheels were on correctly.

Annie (Annie Elizabeth Walk) was married on 24 Apr 1901 to Samuel Sampson Miles, son of Lee Granderson Miles and Emma Wilkinson.  Samuel was born 15 Dec 1876 at Hoytsville, Summit County, Utah.  Samuel and Annie had eight children, whose name and birth dates are given below.

Henry Lee Miles, Annie’s oldest son, is the father of Flora Annie Miles (Duncan), who transcribed this biography about Annie (that you are reading right now).  Flora’s typewritten transcription was done from a autobiography that Annie wrote with her own hands in 1959.

An illustration of how fragile and perilous life is to events beyond our control, where salvation lies in the hands of the Lord, is shown in the following true story:  When Annie was expecting her oldest child (Henry Lee Miles), she was caught in a buggy with a runaway horse.  The horse carried the buggy across a bridge that had no side rails, and the buggy ran off the bridge.  Her husband Samuel S. Miles came to the rescue.  When the horse was brought back, it fell down and died soon thereafter.  Fortunately, Annie was still able to deliver a healthy baby, Henry Lee Miles, despite the runaway horse accident.  That was a good thing.  Otherwise there would be no biography of Annie (Annie Elizabeth Walk Miles) for you to read, since there would be no father (Henry Lee Miles) to sire the writer of this story (typewritten by daughter Flora Annie Miles’ hands)!

During her lifetime, Annie worked in the Primary as First Counselor in 1897, and as Secretary and librarian in the M.I.A. in 1900.  In 1902, she was acting secretary in the Relief Society for one and a half years.  She was a teacher in Relief Society beginning 10 June 1919.  Genealogical work has been her main interest for a great number of years.

The first photo in this chapter shows the picture of 4 generations, with Annie’s father Henry J. Walk, Annie Walk (Miles) hersself, Annie’s first-born son Henry Lee Miles, and Henry’s first-born child Flora Annie Miles (Duncan) as a baby. 

The second photo shows Annie and her husband Samuel with their children in the year 1914.  

The third photo shows Annie’s husband Samuel S. Miles next so his steed.  Horses played a major role during the 1800s and early 1900s for transporting both people and equipment in the western states.  Samuel was unquestionably an outstanding equestrian. 

Communication of Intelligence by Vivid Dreams and Spiritual Means

Tooele, Utah

Search Party Members -- Annie who had the vision, Oldest Son Henry, & Samuel
2 images

This true story (with Affidavit) is about “Spiritual” communication by dreams, in a startling experience in which Mrs. Samuel S. Miles (Annie, née Annie Elizabeth Walk) sees and discovers the exact location of the dead body of Marion Tanner, frozen by accident in a sudden snowstorm deep in the mountains west of Tooele, Utah.

“On 18 Oct 1920, Marion Tanner, with his brother Melvin Tanner, and two friends, Sidney Nelson and William L. Pratt, went deer hunting in the mountains almost due west of Tooele City, Utah, which was the home of the four boys.  During the hunt on October 18, a severe snow storm came up and the Tanner boys became separated from the other two boys.  According to Melvin Tanner, they lost their direction, and after climbing over the mountains for sometime, Marion became exhausted and declared he could go no further.  They then wrote a note on the back of their hunting license as follows:

‘Dear Folks:  We are lost in the fog in the mountains. We are tired and hungry and can go no further.  We ask your forgiveness for our disobedience.’

“After resting a while, Melvin left Marion under a tree and started out in search for help.  After parting from his brother, Melvin occasionally fired a shot from his gun as a signal to his brother.  Marion answered by shots from his gun each time, and Melvin judged from the sounds of Marion’s shots, that Marion was also working his way down the mountain.  Melvin discovered a ranch house which he knew, and give another signal by firing a number of shots which were answered by Marion, apparently about three miles back.  Melvin then went to the ranch house, got a horse, and went back to get Marion, but could not locate him.  He fired a number of shots as signals, but to those shots he got no response.  Falling snow and darkness made further search impossible, so he left the scene and went for help.  Word of losing Marion Tanner spread rapidly during the day of October 19th, and quite a large party that had quickly gathered did considerable searching that day in the neighborhood of where the brothers had parted the night before, searching where the crowd believed he must have gone, judging from the topography of the country and the signals which Melvin had received the night before.

“News of the situation reached Mrs. Samuel S. Miles (Annie) at her home in the outskirts of Tooele at about 10 PM the night of October 19th.

“Her son Lewis had asked to accompany the boys on their hunting trip, but had been prevented from going, on account of farm work.  Being otherwise acquainted with Marion Tanner, Annie was deeply concerned over his loss.  She was in bed and thinking of the matter and apparently fell asleep.

“When her husband Samuel came home one hour later, at 11 PM. she told him she had just awakened from a dream in which she had seen Marion Tanner’s dead body in the mountains.  She gave a general location, describing particularly an opening near some draws or hollows which drained from southwest to northeast.  She also described an old road with a prolific growth of brush on one side all near, and the road leading to the opening where the body lay.  She also said that she believed she could lead a party to the spot which she had seen while apparently asleep.

“On October 19th, the Tanner family and their friends had organized an extensive search.  Soon they were joined by a posse of several hundred men under the direction of the county sheriff.  Large industrial plants were shut down and their employees joined in the search.  Day after day, they searched.  The searching party soon grew, so that it took in not only the civil officials, but leaders in industry and religion as well.  An extensive, systematic search continued for over three weeks, in which the searching party numbered over three hundred men.  The search proved futile.  Despite these futile attempts, Mrs. Miles (Annie) persuaded a few persons to go with her into the mountains, after the others had quit searching.

“The search party went reluctantly and with little hope, as the snow now was piled up very deep in the mountains and horses could be taken only by tramping trail for them in places where the snow was drifted.  They succeeded getting quite high up into the mountains, but only where the posse had already searched.  Mrs. Miles told the party that none of the surroundings corresponded to the spot that she had seen in her dream, and that she felt sure that the spot was further northward on grounds not yet searched.  Her statement received no support.  No one of this party or the former searchers believed that Marion Tanner could have gone further north.  The snow being so hard to surmount, it was therefore decided unwise to try to make further effort to find the location, as seen by Mrs. Miles in her dream.  Mrs. Miles was so disappointed at the termination of this effort to find the spot she had seen in her dream, that she prayed that she might be given another opportunity to go into the mountains in search for Marion Tanner’s body, and that it should be made known to her whom she should have go with her.  She felt doubtful of having a large, unbelieving crowd go.  In answer to her prayer, she had a second dream in which she saw the spirit of Marion Tanner amid members of her own family bringing Marion’s body from the place where it lay as seen in her first dream.  The dream prompted her to select the personnel of the next searching party from her own family, as shown in the dream.

“Deep winter snow and sickness prevented the party from going on the errand until the 15th day of the following May, more than 6 months later after Marion Tanner’s death.

“Before starting on this final search, Mrs. Miles again prayed to the Lord to show her the main mountain behind which the spot, seen in her first dream, was located.  In answer to that prayer, she had her third dream, in which was shown to her the mountain so vividly that she felt sure she could go directly to Marion Tanner’s body.  Accordingly, on the evening of the 14th day of May, Mrs. Miles, her husband, and her son Henry, 19 years old, being the personnel of the party shown in her second dream, took horses and went to the ranch house to which Melvin Tanner came after leaving Marion on October 18, this being the place where be procured the horse to ride back to help Marion.  The Miles stayed at the ranch the night of May 14th.  They all prayed for guidance.  Mrs. Miles says she prayed that she might be led to the spot seen in her first dream, and that the horses might be led.  Next morning shortly after daylight, the little party left the ranch on their horses headed generally for the locality from where they turned back on the former trip made by Mrs. Miles.  For, as she said, she was strongly impressed at the time that the body was right in the open space where she came back through, but the shadow of night had fallen on the first trip.

“They let the horses have their head, except once when the horse Mrs. Miles was riding seemed to pick unnecessarily rough ground.  Then she reprimanded the horse, but upon thinking of her prayer, let him have his way.

“She soon recognized the mountain she had seen in her last dream, and before long she recognized the spot that she had seen in her first dream.  There at that location, were the draws, the road, the prolific growth of brush on the roadside, and the open spot, just as she had seen them in her dream.  She asked the others to stop and look for the body.  She saw something that looked like it might be the body a short distance away, almost where it lay, as seen in the dream.  She sent her son to see what it might be.  He did not go directly, but book a circuitous route.  Before reaching the object, Mr. Miles discovered the body of Marion Tanner, lying between the spot where his wife was and the spot to which his son had gone.  The body lay at the exact spot as seen in the dream, and was in the locality westward from the spot where Mrs. Miles was on her former trip, when she wanted the searchers to search more.  Had the party on her first trip followed her request, they would doubtless have found the body at that time, as it lay something like 200 yards west of where the party stood when they decided to turn back.  The body was found about three miles north of the place where Marion and Melvin had parted after writing the note on the back of the hunting license.

“After verifying the details as seen in the first and third dreams of Mrs. Annie Miles, the party put Marion’s body on the horse and proceeded to carry it to the farm house, as this exactly complied with the details of Mrs. Miles’ second dream.  They reached the farm house between nine and ten o’clock, having gone directly to the body and directly back without losing a moment’s time in searching.  The body reached Tooele before noon, and hundreds of people who had followed the story of Mrs. Miles’ dreams, were amazed at the accuracy with which the situation, as portrayed in the dreams, had been verified.  The matter was made the most prominent feature of the discourses which were delivered at the funeral of Marion Tanner.”

Affidavit --- “To whom it might concern:  We the undersigned have read the foregoing narrative and we hereby verify the matters therein contained, as far as they come within our respective participations in such matters.”

Written by Wm. D Livingston

Signed by W. Leo Isgreen.”

The photo in this chapter is a picture of the people in the search party for Marion Tanner, taken in June 1918, just a little before the 1920 date of when the search described above was successfully conducted.  In the photo appear Mrs Samuel Miles [Annie E Walk (Miles)], her son Henry Lee Miles, and her husband Samuel S. Miles, all of whom participated in finding the dead body of Marion Tanner.  The photo is an accurate representation of how the 3 searchers looked in 1920.

The second photo, taken in 1923, shows Samuel Miles with his horse.  This photo was taken just 3 years after Annie, Samuel, and Henry found the dead body of Marion Tanner in the mountains of Tooele, Utah.  Without horses, traversing miles and miles in the mountains would be nearly impossible.

Utah State Fair, Rug Making, 60th Wedding Anniversary, Obituary

Tooele, Utah

Annie Elizabeth Walk (Miles) Obituary -- 30 Nov 1963
10 images

While Annie was working at the Tooele, Utah Ordinance Depot, .she has occasion to work with Italian and German prisoners of war.  An Italian prisoner painted a picture for her that she prizes very much.  A German prisoner gave her a beautiful picture of a rose-on-white that he had painted. 

For many years, as part of the family farming and clothing activities, Annie prepared handicraft articles along with canned fruits, meats, and vegetables to sustain the family.  Some of these items were submitted for competition in the Utah State Fair, where she won recognition totaling several hundreds of prizes for her submissions.  The very first prize she ever won was at the Church Primary Fair in the 14th Ward on a layer cake that she had made.  The amount of money from the prizes at the Utah State Fair that Annie won was large enough to pay the entire tax bill on their property.  So there was a financial incentive as well as the thrill of competitive victory.

Much of Annie’s spare time was also used in making rugs from strips of rags.  When she was able to spend her time at this art, she found no difficulty in disposing of the rugs, since they were very much in demand and received a good price.

Annie’s marriage was a long one of over 60 year’s duration, where she and her husband Samuel S. Miles enjoyed good health in the farm country of Tooele, Utah, where the family moved in 1917.  Samuel lived to the age of 84 years (Dec 1876 to Jul 1961) and Annie lived to the age of 83 years (Nov 1879 to Nov 1962).  With both of them alive together, Samuel and Annie were able to celebrate their golden anniversary (50 years), and their diamond anniversary (60 years) as a couple together.

A newspaper clipping containing the obituary of Annie Elizabeth Walk (Mrs. Samuel S Miles) is available (see picture).  The clipping lists the date of her funeral as 30 Nov 1963, which is listed also as the date of her death in Tooele, Utah.

Eight Children born to Annie Elizabeth Walk (Miles) and Samuel Sampson Miles

Salt Lake City, Utah

Few of the Great Grandchildren of Annie Walk Miles -- 1954
2 images

Annie Elizabeth Walk was married on 24 April 1901 to Samuel Sampson Miles, son of Lee Granderson Miles and Emma Wilkinson.  Samuel was born 15 Dec 1876 at Hoytsville, Summit County, Utah. The couple had the following eight children, all born in Salt Lake City, Utah, except the last stillborn boy born in Tooele, Utah after the couple moved there in 1917:

Henry Lee Miles --- 22 Jan 1902; m. Mary Morris

Lewis Martin Miles --- 6 Jul 1904; m. Lillis Worthen

Florence Rose Miles --- 01 Jan 1907; m. De Witt Lund; m Vern Roberson

Ada Emma Miles --- 22 Apr 1909; m. John Francis Bolinder

Robert Samuel Miles --- 02 Dec 1911; m. Corella Luella Jacobson; died. 21 Mar 1935

Charles William Miles --- 23 Aug 1913; died 23 May 1930

Lawrence David Miles --- 30 Jan 1916; m. Dorothy Wheeler

Boy stillborn --- 20 Jan 192l

20 Brothers and Sisters of Annie Elizabeth Walk (Miles)

Salt Lake City, Utah

Henry Joseph Walk & Ada Elizabeth Burbidge Family Group Sheet 1854 to 1930
2 images

Here is a listing of the 20 brothers and sisters of Annie Elizabeth Walk (Miles), with herself included, to make 21 in all.  The first 13 (plus herself to make 14) are children by Ada Elizabeth Burbidge, first wife of Henry Joseph Walk by marriage to Ada that occurred in England prior to the couple’s emigrating to Zion in Utah in 1881.  The next seven are by Henry Joseph Walk’s second wife, Lydia E1izabeth Smith.

Charles Henry Walk --- 05 Aug 1877; died in 1878

Henry Charles Walk --- 26 Jul 1878; m. Lucy Gray (Born in England)

Annie Elizabeth Walk --- 02 Nov 1879; m Samuel S. Miles

Joseph Frederick Walk --- 06 May 1883; m. Florence Foulger

Ada Lilly Walk --- 11 Aug 1885; m. Walter Gray

Charles Mann Walk --- 23 Aug 1887; apparently unmarried

Boy --- born 1881; died 1881

William James Walk --- 29 Aug 1889; m. Olive Binnell

Franklin Walk --- 12 Mar 1890; died 16 Sep 1890

Frederick David Walk --- 25 Sep 1892; m. Clara Baer

Fanny Flora Walk --- 28 May 1895; m. LeRoy Hamilton

Martin Samuel. Walk --- 23 Aug 1897; m. Gertrude Bolton; died 01 Dec 1949.

Edith Rose Walk --- 12 Mar 1900; m. George Snarr

Florence Flossie Walk --- 04 Oct 1902; died 24 Jun 1904

After the death of her mother on 10 May 1907, Annie’s father married Lydia E1izabeth Smith on 17 June 1908, after which the following seven brothers and sisters were born:

Harold Joseph Walk --- 4 Apr 1909; m. Muriel Evans; died 1943

Nomi L Walk --- 14 Dec 1910; died 19 Dec 1912

Arline Lydia Walk --- 10 Sep 1912;  m. Pat Wilkins

Ellen Annie Walk --- 21 Jul 1914; died 05 Jan 1915

George Albert Walk --- 18 Sep 1917; m. Shirley Ruth Orton

Earl Franklin Walk --- 03 Dec 1915; m.Thek1e Runz

Don Eugene Walk --- 18 Aug 1920; died 28 Dec 1925

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