Summary

Conflict Period:
Civil War (Confederate) 1
Branch:
Confederate Army 1
Rank:
Colonel 1
Birth:
06 Feb 1830 1
Aiken, S. C. 1
Death:
31 Dec 1862 1
Murfreesboro, Tennessee 1
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Personal Details

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Person:
Augustus Jackson Lythgoe 1
Augustus J Lythgoe 2
Age in 1860: 30 2
Birth:
06 Feb 1830 1
Aiken, S. C. 1
Male 1
Birth:
South Carolina 2
Male 2
Estimated Birth Year: 1830 2
Death:
31 Dec 1862 1
Murfreesboro, Tennessee 1
Cause: Died from the effects of amputation during the Battle Of Stones River 1
Residence:
Place: Abbeville County, South Carolina 2
From: 1860 2
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Civil War (Confederate) 1

Branch:
Confederate Army 1
Rank:
Colonel 1

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Sources

  1. Contributed by bruceyrock632
  2. Census - US Federal 1860 [See image]
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Biography

Augustus J. Lythgoe was the son of a British immigrant. He was born in the Aiken area and educated at the South Carolina Military Academy. He worked on the Blue Ridge Railroad until it was suspended. (The remains of this failed railroad are still visible in the Stumphouse Tunnel, north of Walhalla.) Lythgoe then moved to Abbeville and married Margaret Isabella Wier. With his brother-in-law, John A. Wier, Lythgoe went into the mercantile business under the name of Lythgoe & Wier. During the Civil War, Lythgoe joined the 19th SC Regiment, attaining the rank of colonel by December 1861. He was killed at the Battle of First Murfreesboro and buried at the battle site. He also has a marker in Upper Long Cane Cemetery and was survived by a wife, one son, and two daughters.

Source: http://under-the-kudzu.blogspot.com/

Augustus Jackson Lythgoe

Augustus Jackson Lythgoe was born in Aiken, S. C., February 6, 1830. He was a son of George B. Lythgoe, who came from Liverpool, England, and Nancy (Randall) Lythgoe. His primary education was obtained in the schools of Aiken and at the South Carolina military academy. Having finished his course as a student he chose civil engineering as his profession and engaged in service with the South Carolina railroad, then in the survey and construction of the Columbia & Greenville, and afterward with the Blue Ridge railroad company. When work was suspended on the latter road Mr. Lythgoe went to Abbeville, where he had previously married (June 27, 1850) Miss Margaret I. Wier, and engaged in a general merchandise business with his brother-in-law, John A. Wier. The business of the firm was conducted with success for a few years, when the war began, and true to his training and patriotic nature, he left his young wife and three little children, to serve his country as a soldier. He became a member of Capt. Joseph H. Cunningham's company of infantry, which was afterward known as Company G, Nineteenth South Carolina volunteer infantry, and was elected to a lieutenancy. At the resignation of Captain Cunningham, Lieutenant Lythgoe was elected captain, and at the organization of the regiment near Columbia, in December, 1861, he became lieutenant-colonel and was soon afterward elected colonel. During the month of March, 1862, the regiment was ordered to Corinth, Miss., where it was made a part of the brigade known afterward as Gen. A. M. Manigault's brigade, one of the finest in the army, and served with distinction to the end of the war with the army of Tennessee. It was but a few weeks after the regiment reached Corinth that it was under fire for the first time in the battle of Farmington, and here Colonel Lythgoe distinguished himself as a gallant soldier and capable officer. His conduct was so much admired that when, shortly after this battle, a reorganization took place, this noble young Carolinian was almost unanimously re-elected colonel of the regiment. In the memorable Kentucky campaign of General Bragg, Colonel Lythgoe was constantly and conspicuously present in person and with his regiment. Murfreesboro was one of

the bloodiest battles of the war, and here again and for the last time Colonel Lythgoe led his regiment with great skill and valor into the thickest of the fight and assisted the brigade in the capture of a battery of four guns. This exploit was so daring and brilliant that the commanding general of the army by general orders directed that the chief officers, Colonel Lythgoe being one, should have their names inscribed upon the several pieces. In this battle Colonel Lythgoe received a mortal wound from which he died in a few hours, and his remains lie buried at Murfreesboro.

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