Summary

Birth:
09 Jul 1746 1
Death:
04 May 1826 1
Morganton, Burke, North Carolina 1
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Personal Details

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Birth:
09 Jul 1746 1
Male 1
Death:
04 May 1826 1
Morganton, Burke, North Carolina 1
Burial:
Burial Date: aft 04 May 1826 1
Burial Place: Ebenezer (aka Old Siloam) Cemetery, Old Fort, North Carolina 1
Residence:
Place: Burke County, North Carolina 1
From: bef 1776 1
To: 1826 1
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Birth:
Mother: Susannah Patton 1
Father: James Hemphill 1
Marriage:
Mary Ann Mackie 1
01 Mar 1773 1
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Occupation:
Farmer 1
Employment:
Employer: North Carolina Militia 1
Position: Captain 1

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Stories

American Revolutionary War

North Carolina

"In January 1780, Hemphill joined a mounted rifle company commanded by Capt. Robert Patton. Hemphill served as lietenant. In early April, the company then began a march toward Charleston, S. C., then under partial siege by the British. They arrived at Monck's Corner, South Carolina, coming under the combined command of Gen. Isaac Huger. The day after they arrived, in a pre-dawn, the British completely routed and dispersed the Americans (April 14, 1780). By this action, the encirclement of Charleston was completed. Patton, Hemphill, and the remnants of their command later joined in with the the mounted troops of Col. William Washington, remained at Camden for a while, and then marched to Cross Creek. At Cross Creek, they came under the command of Col. Charles McDowell. Col. McDowell and his troops marched back toward Charlotte and eventually to Lincoln County.

Hemphill and his men, being mounted, advanced quickly into Burke County. He, in the meantime, had received a Captain's Commission, and began to organize a company at Burke Court House. From Burke Court House, he and his company marched to Ramsour's Mill and took part in that battle, June 20, 1780. Afterwards, Hemphill and his men accompanied the McDowells in the S. C. skirmishes in the summer of 1780 and in the King's Mountain campaign that followed."

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