Summary

Seeking information on Susannah's parentage, her family, and Indian heritage.

Birth:
abt 1786 1
Florida, Montgomery, New York 1
Death:
after 1850 1
of Oxford, Chenango, New York 1
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Pictures & Records (10)

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Family of Rachel Almira Youngs Cole
Family of Rachel Almira Youngs Cole
Rachel is older woman in center of picture.
Footstone for John S. Cole
Footstone for John S. Cole
John S. Cole and Rachel Almira Youngs Cole
John S. Cole and Rachel Almira Youngs Cole
This photo was taken by my mother, Eunice Harmon, in 2002. The headstone for John S. And Rachel Almira was broken. We cleaned it up and took pictures.
Footstone for Rachel Almira Youngs Cole
Footstone for Rachel Almira Youngs Cole
Pine Cemetery, Walton, Delaware Co., New York
Front entrance to Pine Cemetery at Walton, Delaware, NY
Front entrance to Pine Cemetery at Walton, Delaware, NY
Pine Cemetery-Route #10, Walton,NY-- no longer in use [Sep 2002 Karen Hall and Eunice Harmon found broken headstone for John S. And Rachel Almira. The Pine Cemetery is located outside the village of Walton several miles in a field behind private property. There is a dirt road leading back to it. It is fenced.
Newspaper article at death of Rachel Almira Youngs Cole
Newspaper article at death of Rachel Almira Youngs Cole
Includes poem by her daughter.
Mary Adela Cole Clark
Mary Adela Cole Clark
Daughter of John and Rachel Cole; wife of Robert Clark
Mary Adela Cole and Robert Clark
Mary Adela Cole and Robert Clark
Cole, William N. {Pine Cem.].JPG
Cole, William N. {Pine Cem.].JPG
William N. Cole, son of John and Rachel Almira Youngs Cole; buried at Pine Cemetery at Walton, Delaware, New York; also his wife, Delana Thorp.
George Riley Cole
George Riley Cole
Son of John S. Cole and Rachel Almira Youngs Cole. He married Anne Louise Mullenex.

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Personal Details

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Full Name:
Susannah Ferguson 1
Birth:
abt 1786 1
Florida, Montgomery, New York 1
Female 1
Death:
after 1850 1
of Oxford, Chenango, New York 1
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Marriage:
John Youngs 1
1802 1
Amsterdam, Montgomery, New York 1
To: Otsego, Otsego, New York 1
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Race or Ethnicity:
Native American ? 1

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Sources

  1. Contributed by CherylBills
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Stories

Early Settlers of Springfield, Otsego, NY

Springfield, Otsego, New York

 In the year 1762 five families took up lands in the town, [of Springfield, Otsego, NY]1778 viz.: those of John Kelly, Richard Ferguson [is he a relative of Susannah?] and James Young [brother of John?] in the eastern part, Gustavus Klmph and Jacob Tynart at the head of the lake. Very few additions were made to this little community until after the Revolution.  At the battle of Oriskany in 1777 Capt. Thomas Davy, who has descendants now living in the town, was killed. In the following year Joseph Brant,the leader of the Six Nations, came to Springfield with a party, burned the town and killed or carried into captivity the men, but this famous chief was merciful. It is recorded that he "gathered together the women and children into one house and left them injured--an act not followed by his tory allies."

On the return of peace there was an immediate influx of settlers into this region. Among them were Benjamin Rathbun and John Cotes, who as a lad of sixteen had taken part in the battle of Bunker Hill, John James and Robert Young. 

Other pioneers after the Revolution were Moses Franklin, Abner Cooke, Calvin and Luther Smith. Elisha Hall, the inventor of the well known Hall threshing machine, was a pioneer at Springfield Center. Hezekiah Hayden was a pioneer and his descendants have been distinguished elsewhere.

http://www.rootsweb.com/~nyotsego/spr.htm

Residences of John Youngs, husband of Susannah

Amsterdam, Montgomery, New York

Revolutionary War Pension File: S24032 . See at Heritage Quest online. Also on Footnote.com

pg 245: "While residing in Stamford, Connecticut, he enlisted and served as a private with the Connecticut troops as follows: from Sept 15, 1776, six or seven months in Captain (John) Hobby's company; Colonel John Head's Regiment; from the later part of April 1777 six months in Captain Smith's company; Colonel Mead's Reg; from April 1778 three months as a ranger under Colonel Mead; from Nov 2, 1781, four months in Captain Nathaniel Edward's Company under Colonel Shipman. He was also called out at various times for short tours or alarms until the end of the war under Captain Smith. He stated that he was at the burning of Danbury and in engagements at Bedford and Horse Neck and that he was present when General Putnam rode down the steps near Stamford.

After the Revolution, he resided in Amsterdam, NY for 18 years; then resided in Otsego, Otsego County, NY for twenty-two years; and then in Butternuts, Otsego, NY where he had been residing for 4 years when he was allowed pension on his application executed May 30, 1833. In 1841, he was living in Smyrna, Chenango, New York. Children are referred to; their names and name of soldier's wife not given. No formal application ever made by anyone claiming to be a widow of Joseph Youngs.

Soldier had a brother, Thomas, who served with him. After the death of Thomas, his widow Anne or Anna married a Mr. Jobes (or Joles) . It is stated that she (Anna) is the mother of the Honorable Samuel Youngs of NY state.

In 1833, a Clement Youngs lived in same neighborhood; no relationship given.

In 1842, his daughter Mindwell Youngs ______ died in Smyrna, NY. Perhaps he lived with her.

MILITARY: Revolutionary War http://www.rootsweb.com/~nyotsego/vetsplaques.htm

RESIDENCE: Stamford, CT prior to Revolutionary War

After Revolution: Amsterdam, NY for 18 years

Then Otsego, Otsego, NY for 22 years

Butternuts, Otsego, NY--abt 1829- was there four years in 1833 when received pension

1841 Symnra, Chenango, NY

RESIDENCE: ONEONTA -- was formed from Unadilla, Feb. 5, 1796, as "Otego." Its name was changed April 17, 1830. It is the central town upon the S. border of the co. Its surface is a hilly upland, broken by the deep valley of the Susquehanna, which extends N. E. and S. W. through the S. part. Otego Creek and several small streams flow into the Susquehanna from the N. A range of hills 500 ft. high extends along the S. E. bank of the Susquehanna. The center and N. part are hilly, and broken by narrow and irregular valleys. The summits are 150 to 300 ft. above the valleys. The soil is gravel, slate, and clay on the uplands, and gravelly loam and alluvium upon the river bottoms. Oneonta, (p.v.,) in the S. part, on the Susquehanna was incorp. Oct. 14, 1848. It contains 3 churches, a newspaper office, woolen factory, carriage factory, iron foundery, tannery, gristmill, sawmill, and distillery. Pop. 678. West Oneonta (p.v.) contains 15 dwellings; Oneonta Plains, 2 churches, and a dozen houses. Henry Scramlin and __ Youngs settled in town previous to the Revolution.1 The first religious association (Presb.) was formed at Oneonta Village, in 1786; Rev. Alexander Conkey was the first preacher, when the church was built in 1816.2

1 Aaron Brink, Frederick Brown, and __ McDonald were among the early settlers at Oneonta Village. James Youngs settled at the mouth of Charlotte River; Baltus Himmel, N. of the village; Abraham Houghtaling, Jacob Elias Brewer, and Peter Swartz, in the N. part of the town, in 1786; and Josiah Peck, on Oneonta Creek. The first birth was that of Abraham Houghtaling, 2d, in 1786. Baltus Himmel kept the first inn, and Peter Dintney the first store. John Vanderworker erected the first gristmill.

More Residence of John Youngs and Susannah Ferguson

Otsego, Otsego, New York

RESIDENCE: Stamford, CT prior to Revolutionary War

After Revolution: Amsterdam, NY for 18 years

Then Otsego, Otsego, NY for 22 years

Butternuts, Otsego, NY--abt 1829- was there four years in 1833 when received pension

1841 Symnra, Chenango, NY

 

Regarding Otsego, Otsego:

ONEONTA -- was formed from Unadilla, Feb. 5, 1796, as "Otego." Its name was changed April 17, 1830. It is the central town upon the S. border of the co. Its surface is a hilly upland, broken by the deep valley of the Susquehanna, which extends N. E. and S. W. through the S. part. Otego Creek and several small streams flow into the Susquehanna from the N. A range of hills 500 ft. high extends along the S. E. bank of the Susquehanna. The center and N. part are hilly, and broken by narrow and irregular valleys. The summits are 150 to 300 ft. above the valleys. The soil is gravel, slate, and clay on the uplands, and gravelly loam and alluvium upon the river bottoms. Oneonta, (p.v.,) in the S. part, on the Susquehanna was incorp. Oct. 14, 1848. It contains 3 churches, a newspaper office, woolen factory, carriage factory, iron foundery, tannery, gristmill, sawmill, and distillery. Pop. 678. West Oneonta (p.v.) contains 15 dwellings; Oneonta Plains, 2 churches, and a dozen houses. Henry Scramlin and __ Youngs settled in town previous to the Revolution.1 The first religious association (Presb.) was formed at Oneonta Village, in 1786; Rev. Alexander Conkey was the first preacher, when the church was built in 1816.2

1 Aaron Brink, Frederick Brown, and __ McDonald were among the early settlers at Oneonta Village. James Youngs settled at the mouth of Charlotte River; Baltus Himmel, N. of the village; Abraham Houghtaling, Jacob Elias Brewer, and Peter Swartz, in the N. part of the town, in 1786; and Josiah Peck, on Oneonta Creek. The first birth was that of Abraham Houghtaling, 2d, in 1786. Baltus Himmel kept the first inn, and Peter Dintney the first store. John Vanderworker erected the first gristmill.

IS JOSIAH PECK related to John Young's mother, Elizabeth Peck, wife of Joseph Youngs?

Butternuts, Otsego, NY -- birth of daughter, Rachel Almira Youngs

Butternuts, Otsego, New York

Death Certificate #269 (06526): CERTIFICATE OF DEATH in the Town of Masonville, County of Delaware, State of New York: Rachel Almira Cole age 77 y 4 m 6 d. sex Female; Birthplace, Butternuts, Otsego County ; Father John Youngs; Mother Susanna Furgason; Place of Death; Masonville, Del. Co., New York. date and hour of death 16 day of February 1896 at about 6 am. Dropsy [unable to make out next word]; Signed by G. W. Blind, M.D. residence Trout Creek

Census Records of Susannah Ferguson Youngs

Unadilla, Otsego, New York

The 1790, 1800, 1820 and 1810 census indexes for New York State show a number of Ferguson families living in Montgomery County. (The name can be spelled Farguson, Ferguson, Firguson,Forguson and Furguson and the u after the g can also be replaced with other vowels so it is a job to be sure to get them all.) Otsego County was formed from Montgomery County in 1791.

CENSUS: 1830 New York, Otsego County, Unadilla, Northern District Page 221 Susanna Young  (mother of Rachel Almira Young )

Susanna Young; 1 male 5-10; 1 20 - 30; Females, 1 5-10; 1 15=20; 1 40-50.

CENSUS: 1840 New York, Otsego Co, Town of Otego

Susannah Young 1M 10-15; 1F 30-40; 1F 40-50;

CENSUS: 1850 New York, Otsego Co, Town of Otego, reel 580 pg 163

Susannah Young 50 Female born New York

Rain On The Face

Florida, Montogmery, New York ?

From a newspaper article shared with me by Burton David Cole's grandson, Wyn Cole: [Susannah Ferguson Youngs is the great grandmother of Burton Cole,]  Some facts in this report are quite suspect; others seem to verify our family tradition.  The picture mentioned turns out to be of the daughter, Rachel Almira Youngs Cole and her family.  Rachel is actually the grandmother of Burton Cole and she is the one they identify as their Indian Princess.  Susannah Ferguson is Rachel's mother.

Written by John Dagley, Enquirer Staff Writer 7/23/1980  [NOTICE -- ENQUIRER]

Tuskegee, Ala.--Burton Cole's name may not be familiar to you, but when he celebrates his birthday President Carter is among the dignataries who congratulate him.

That's because Cole, who turned 101 Tuesday, is one of only five living veterans of the Spanish-American War. He's the only veteran of that forgotten war, living in Alabama.

Cole was the star attraction on "family-day" Tuesday at Tuskegee's Veterans Administrative Hospital, where he's lived for 10 years in the hospital's nursing home.

His eyesight and hearing are poor. He sleeps a lot, and according to his son Emerson, he spends much of his waking time in a reverie.

Yet Cole is doing "better than ever now, even better than last year," says his son.

Emerson Cole, a retired illustrator, who lives in Huntsville, tells an interesting story about his father.

"Dad was born in New York state, in the Adirondacks. He had only a third or fourth grade education when he got out of the service, and you know, he went back to school with the younger kids and went all the way through college at New York University.

"He never saw action in the war. He trained to fight, but the hostilities ended before he could be sent to Cuba. Instead of mustering them out when the war ended, the Army sent Dad and the others out west to fight some of the last battles with the Indians.

"Dad is part Indian himself. His grandmother was a Seminole princess who left her tribe in the Tampa Bay area to protest the tribe's cruelty against its own people. They were terribly cruel to their old people and would just leave them out in the woods to die.

"She left the Tampa Bay area and walked across the state. At Jacksonville, she met a Mohawk Indian who had traveled down the east coast from up north because he was fascinated with the ocean. He talked her into going north with him. Meanwhile, though, a posse from her tribe came after her. But she went on to New York and, to this day, there are Seminole Indians living in New York.

"After he graduated from NYU, Dad taught school for 16 years in one-room country schoolhouses in upstate New York. Farming was what he really liked best, though, but he wasn't as good at it as he was teaching."

For the past 20 years, Cole has lived in Florida and Alabama VA hospitals.

The nurses and attendants at Tuskegee's VA Hospital speak fondly of Cole, and credit his long life to the way he takes care of himself. They say he eats well, keeps himself warm, stays relatively active but never does anything hurriedly.

Florida--the State; or Florida, New York???  On 11 Sep 2007 Wyn Cole wrote: As I understand from my father, Gerald Emerson Cole, my grandfather David B. Cole and his sister were orphans. I never knew my grand fathers sisters name or his parents name. All I know is his wife’s name. The name of the Indian wife, as I was told by my father was "Rain on the face" and that she was with the Delaware tribe. As far as proof, I would have to go the veterans administration to dig out that information if I can. It may bare knowing that my grand father Cole died in 1981 (I think) at the age of 101 ½ . We still have the cape he wore in the Spanish American war and somewhere we have a family picture of Rain on the face.  I understand the confusion about where the Indian came from. The story in the paper came from my dad. I can remember my dad and his brother arguing about it. Dad said she came from Florida, my uncle said she was from NY. I can’t help but notice that there is a Florida in NY. Could this be a misunderstanding on my father’s part? The argument between my father and his brother was that the Indian came up from Florida and my uncle said she did not. I don’t have any military papers on my grandfather. I would be interested in trying to obtain some if I could.

To see information on this family at Ancestry.com, go to the following link: http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/904829/person/-2029832050 The name of my tree is Cheryl's Ancestry Dec 2006. I'd love to hear personally from anyone researching this family!

In my search for "how Florida, NY was named, I came across this information:The first inhabitants of the Town of Florida were the Mohawk Indians, the strongest and most powerful of the Iroquois Confederacy. Their villages were scattered throughout the entire Mohawk Valley. At the point where Schoharie Creek flows into the Mohawk River, the area now called Fort Hunter, the Mohawks had their "Lower Castle". They called this village TI-ON-ON-TO-GEN. It was an important center for tribal gatherings and decision making. This page goes into great detail. Here's the link if anyone is interested http://www.co.montgomery.ny.us/florida/ Perhaps, this is how Suzannah ended up with a Mohawk Indian.

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