Summary

Amelia Earhart never settled for the limitations society placed on women and their careers. She set several records in aviation and pioneered new boundaries for women. At a young age, Amelia saw her first plane and was unimpressed, but after her first flight, flying became a life-long career. In June 1928, Amelia became the first woman to fly across the Atlantic. In January 1935, she became the first person to fly solo across the Pacific from Honolulu to Oakland. Despite her amazing life accomplishments, Amelia is most remembered for her final flight. On June 1,1937, she began her now-infamous flight around the world. On July 2, 1937, while en route to refuel at Howland Island, Amelia's plane disappeared. After one of the largest searches conducted by the American government at that time, Amelia was declared dead on July 19. But despite her legendary death, Amelia lived to fly and ascended to new heights for aviators and women throughout the world.

Birth:
24 Jul 1897 1
Atchison, Kansas 1
Death:
02 Jul 1937 2
En route from Lae, New Guinea, to Howland Island 3
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Earhart, Amelia
Earhart, Amelia
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Amelia Earhart.jpg
Amelia Earhart.jpg
1932-Jul-7 Golden Valley News, Page 3
1932-Jul-7 Golden Valley News, Page 3
Newspaper article about Amelia flying alone over the ocean.
1937-Jul-3 News Letter Journal, Page 1
1937-Jul-3 News Letter Journal, Page 1
1937-Jul-6 News Letter Journal, Page 1
1937-Jul-6 News Letter Journal, Page 1
1937-Jul-7 News Letter Journal, Page 1
1937-Jul-7 News Letter Journal, Page 1
1937-Jul-8 News Letter Journal, Page 1
1937-Jul-8 News Letter Journal, Page 1
1937-Jul-9 News Letter Journal, Page 1
1937-Jul-9 News Letter Journal, Page 1
1937-Jul-10 News Letter Journal, Page 1
1937-Jul-10 News Letter Journal, Page 1
1937-Jul-13 News Letter Journal, Page 1
1937-Jul-13 News Letter Journal, Page 1
1937-Jul-14 News Letter Journal, Page 1
1937-Jul-14 News Letter Journal, Page 1
1937-Jul-15 News Letter Journal, Page 1
1937-Jul-15 News Letter Journal, Page 1
1937-Jul-16 News Letter Journal, Page 1
1937-Jul-16 News Letter Journal, Page 1
1937-Jul-17 News Letter Journal, Page 1
1937-Jul-17 News Letter Journal, Page 1

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Personal Details

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Also known as:
Lady Lindy, after Charles Lindbergh 2
Person:
Amelia Earhart 3
Age in 1930: 31 3
Birth:
24 Jul 1897 1
Atchison, Kansas 1
Female 1
Birth:
Estimated Birth Year: 1899 3
Death:
02 Jul 1937 2
En route from Lae, New Guinea, to Howland Island 2
Cause: Likely a plane crash, no body has ever been recovered 2
Residence:
Place: NEW YORK County, New York 3
From: 1930 3
Enumeration District: MANHATTAN BOROUGH 3
Edit
Birth:
Mother: Amelia "Amy" Otis Earhart 1
Father: Samuel "Edwin" Stanton Earhart 1
Marriage:
George Putnam 2
07 Feb 1931 2
To: 02 Jul 1937 2
Edit
Occupation:
Pilot 2
Missing Flight:
Date: 02 Jul 1937 1
Departure: Lae, Papua New Guinea 1
Destination: Howland Island 1
1st person to fly solo from Los Angeles to Mexico:
April l9 - 20, 1935 4
Began flight around the world:
01 Jun 1937 4
Disappeared over the Pacific with navigator:
02 Jul 1937 4
First person to fly solo across the Pacific:
11 Jan 1935 4
First to fly solo nonstop from Mexico City-Newark:
08 May 1935 4
Became a nurse's aide at Spadina Military Hospital:
1918 5
Became a nurse's aide at Spadina Military Hospital:
Toronto, Canada 5
Became a social worker at Denison House in Boston:
1926 4
Became a social worker at Denison House in Boston:
Boston, Massachusetts 4
Began flying lessons with Neta Snook:
03 Jan 1921 4
Bought an Avro Avian, a small English plane:
Summer 1928 4
Bought first plane, Kinner Airster (Canary):
July 1921 4
Broke her previous transcontinental speed record:
July 7-8, 1933 4
Broke women's altitude record, she rose 14,000 ft:
22 Oct 1922 4
Elected as an official for National Aeronautic Asc:
Fall 1929 4
Elected president of the Ninety Nines:
Fall 1932 4
First woman to fly across the Atlantic:
June 17-18, 1928 4
First woman to fly solo across the Atlantic:
May 20-21, 1932 4
First woman to fly solo nonstop coast to coast:
August 24-25, 1932 4
Graduated from Hyde Park High School:
1915 4
Placed third in First Women's Air Derby:
August 1929 4
Published book 20 Hours 40 Minutes:
Fall 1928 4
Set speed record for of 181.18mph over a 3K course:
05 Jul 1930 4
Set woman's autogiro altitude record of 18,415 ft:
08 Apr 1931 4
Set women's speed record for 100 km with no load:
25 Jun 1930 4
FAI Pilot's License Number:
6017 2

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"I want to do it because I want to do it. Women must try to do things as men have tried. When they fail, their failure must be but a challenge to others."--Amelia Earhart

Added by Clio

The Search for Amelia

1937-Jul-3 News Letter Journal, Page 1
11 images

On July 2, 1937, Amelia Earhart and her navigator Frederick Noonan disappeared during flight. Earhart had left from Lae, New Guinea, and was suppose to arrive at Howland Island to refuel. Howland Island is only one-and-a-half miles long and half-a-mile wide in the great abyss of the Pacific Ocean. Two U.S. ships were located along the route and ordered to keep all their lights on to help Earhart mark the way. Another ship, the ITASCA, was the couple's radio connection close to Howland. When Earhart took off the morning of July 2, the skies were overcast and intermittent rain showers prevailed. The weather made Noonan's method of tracking, based on celestial navigation, very difficult. Earhart radioed the ITASCA for bearings, but while the ship sent her a steady stream of measurements, Earhart received none of the transmissions and radio contact was difficult due to the weather. At 7:42 A.M. Earhart sent the message to the ITASCA saying, “We must be on you, but we cannot see you. Fuel is running low. Been unable to reach you by radio. We are flying at 1,000 feet.” The next and last message the ship received was simply, “We are running north and south.” Amelia Earhart was never heard from again.

The search that ensued was the longest and most extensive search undertaken by the U.S. Navy and Air Force at that time. On July 19, the U.S. government called off the search. They had spent $4 million and searched 250,000 square miles of sea. The country sadly ceded that Amelia was gone. These newspapers follow the search for Amelia. Many theories exist that shy away from the idea that she died searching for Howland Island, but it is accepted in history, that while there is no proof of her death, she perished at sea.

Source: http://www.ameliaearhart.com/about/bio2.html

Added by Clio

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