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patootie63
patootie63

Francis H Griswold Born in 1904 Entering military service as an aviation cadet in September 1928. He completed flying training at Kelly Field, Texas, in October 1929. In July 1943, assigned to the Eighth Air Force in England where he served successively as chief of staff of the 8th Fighter Command, the 2nd Bomb Division, and the Eighth Air Force. He went to the Pacific in July 1945 as commanding general of the 301st Fighter Wing on Okinawa, and the following October returned to the United States. He became vice commander in chief of SAC in April 1954, where he remained until July 1, 1961, when he was named commandant, the National War College, Washington, D.C. Passed away on 11 april 1989

patootie63
patootie63

Jesse Auton Was born on 1 dec 1904. Following pilot training in Texas, Auton was commissioned a Second Lieutenant in January 1930. In april 1943, was commander of 65th Fighter Wing In March 1944, he was given the temporary rank of Brigadier General and commanded the wing through November 1945, flying 12 combat missions. Auton was killed in a plane crash at Offutt Air Force Base, Omaha, on 30 march 1952, while returning on a flight from California (his B-29 crashed into a hill on a farm while coming in for a landing at Offutt Air Force Base with one engine dead.)

patootie63
patootie63

William Ellsworth Kepner He was born on 6 janvier 1893 in Miami County, Indiana. Famed pioneer balloonist He served four years in the Marine Corps. He was appointed a 2nd Lt. in the Indiana National Guard. Served in the infantry on the Mexican border. He commanded the Eighth Pursuit Group in 1938 In 1942 promoted to Brig. General and made Commander of Fourth Interceptor Com.mand at March AFB, CA He was appointed Commanding General of the Fourth Air Force in March 1943 and Sept. 1943 assumed command of the Eighth Fighter Command, ETO Named Commanding General of the 2nd Bombardment Division of the 8th A.F In May 1945, he assumed command of the 8th Air Force and was a part of the American/Allies who received the German's final surrender at Reims, France In August 1945, he became Commanding General of the 9th A.F., which was the occupational Air Force in Europe In 1948 he was appointed Commanding General of Eglin Proving Ground, FL, and in 1950, Commander-in-Chief of Alaskan Command. He was awarded the DSC, purple heart, DFC, Legion of Merit - two clusters, DSM - one cluster, Bronze Star, Air Medal, USMC Good Conduct Medal, and many many foreign decorations and awards. He retired as Lt. Gen. in February, 1953 Passed away on 3 july 1982 Passed away on 3 july 1982

patootie63
patootie63

Murray C Woodbury Commander of 50th FG from 15 may to 23 july 1942, of the 66th Fighter Wing on 1 april 1943 Commander of 3rd Air Division from 6 sept to 21 nov 1945 Commander of the 6th Air Division between 17 feb and 28 july 1948, of Eglin Air Force Base from 29 sept 1949 to 20 dec 1950

patootie63
patootie63

Edward W Anderson Was born at Manhattan, Kan., in 1903 In October 1928 he entered the Army as a flying cadet and a year later upon graduating was appointed a second lieutenant. In March 1942 he became commanding officer of the 20th Fighter Group at Wilmington, Del., and Charlotte, N.C. In September 1942 he went to England to organize the 4th Fighter Group composed of American pilots who had formed the Eagle Squadrons of the Royal Air Force. After commanding this group for one year he became commanding officer of the 65th Fighter Wing in England and in March 1944 was promoted to Brigadier General. In July 1943 he returned to the United States and became chief of staff of the 1st Fighter Command at Mitchell Air Force Base, N.Y., and later as chief of staff of the 1st Air Force. In April 1947 he became commanding general of the Air Force Technical Training School at Keesler Air Force Base, Miss. After one year he was appointed deputy commander and chief of staff of the Technical Division of the Air Training Command at Scott Air Force Base, Ill. In November 1948 he went to England where he served as chief of staff of the 3rd Air Division at London, England and later as the commanding general of the 59th Air Depot Wing, Burtonwood, England. He returned to the United States in July 1950 as the assistant deputy chief of staff, comptroller, Headquarters U.S. Air Force, Washington D.C. He left this position in July 1954 and Oct. 1 assumed command of the San Bernardino Air Materiel Area under the Air Materiel Command. General Anderson has been awarded the Legion of Merit, Silver Star, Bronze Star Medal, Air Medal with two oak leaf clusters; American Theater Medal, American Defense Service Medal, World War II Victory Medal, and the European - African - Mediterranean Ribbon with six stars. His foreign decorations include the French Croix de Guerre with Palm, and the French Legion of Honor. Died on 12 april 1979 source USAF website

patootie63
patootie63

Thomas Jonathan Jackson Christian Jr Born on 19 november 1915 in San Francisco, California. Great grandson of Confederate General Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson. From 1939 to 1941, Christian was a student in Texas at the Air Corps Primary Flying School at Love Field in Dallas, the Air Corps Training Center at Randolph Field and the Air Corps Advanced Flying School at Kelly Field, both in San Antonio. After receiving training as a pilot, Christian was assigned to the Philippines, where, after the attacks on Pearl Harbor, he was reassigned to Bataan, Mindanao, Australia, and Guadalcanal. While there, he flew B-17s and was shot down and declared missing in action somewhere in the South Pacific. He was able to return to the base after living with natives in the jungle. With the 1st Air Group, Christian landed on Guadalcanal on August 15, 1942. While there, he flew more than 60 hours in combat missions and was awarded the Silver Star for gallantry. While in the U. S., he formed and trained the 361st Fighter Group. They were sent to England in November 1943. In Europe, Christian flew more than 70 combat missions and was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross with Oak Leaf Clusters, the Air Medal with three Oak Leaf Clusters and the Purple Heart. In March 1944 he was promoted to full Colonel. Christian was killed in action on August 12, 1944, while flying a P-51 Mustang, which was named Lou IV, in honor of his daughter. Colonel Christian was shot down over Arras, France and his body was never recovered. source Texas State Cemetery website

patootie63
patootie63

Barton M Russell Commander of 77th FS from 5 dec 1941 to 1 aug 1942, 20th FG from 20 aug 43 to 2 march 44 357th FG from 1 april to 20 aug 1946 33rd FG on 20 aug 1946. 78th FG from 8 dec 1948 to aug 1949 51st Fighter Wing from 2 july to 1st aug 1954

patootie63
patootie63

Joe L Mason 5 victories with the 352nd FG (was commander of this unit between 17 may 1943 and 17 nov 1944) Tok command of Nellis Air Force Base on 4 jan 1949 until 8 jan 1951 Commander of the 49th Fighter Wing between 1st sept 1951 and 1st feb 1952 National Commander on the Civil Air Patrol between 1st aug 1964 and 30 april 1967

patootie63
patootie63

Avelin Paul Tacon Jr Born at Mobile, Alabama, in 1914. In January 1943, then Lieutenant Colonel Tacon was transferred to Westover Field, Mass., to assume command of the newly organized 359th Fighter Group. After completion of his combat tour, he became executive officer of the 67th Fighter Wing with headquarters near Peterborough, England. After the cessation of hostilities in Europe, Colonel Tacon was assigned to Headquarters American Graves Registration Command in Paris, for the purpose of organizing a staff section to aid in the location of missing aircrews. He remained in this assignment until April 1946 when he returned to the United States. Colonel Tacon assumed command of Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., in January 1951 . Graduating in June 1953, the general was ordered to Korea to assume command of the 18th Fighter Bomber Wing, stationed at Osan. During his tour with the 18th he formed and personally led a precision acrobatic team of F-86s. He was reassigned to Headquarters Tactical Air Command, Langley Air Force Base, Va., in August 1954. In August of 1959, General Tacon led six F-104 tactical fighters on Starblazer I from Myrtle Beach, S.C., to Moron Air Base, Spain. This was the first Atlantic crossing of the F-104 and paved the way for subsequent deployments of Starfighter squadrons. In June 1960, he was transferred to Twelfth Air Force Headquarters in Waco to become deputy commander. He was promoted to major general in 1961. General Tacon served as deputy commander, 12th Air Force until May 1962 when he was transferred to the Philippines to assume the duties of chief, Joint United States Military Advisory Group to the Republic of the Philippines. General Tacon was a command pilot with 300 combat hours. The general holds the Legion of Merit, Distinguished Flying Cross with two clusters, Air Medal with six Clusters, Commendation Medal, and the Croix de Guerre with Palm. source usaf website

patootie63
patootie63

Einar Axel Malmstrom Born on 14 july 1907 in Chicago. In May 1943, he moved to the European Theater of Operations, and assumed command of the 356th Fighter Group in November. On April 24, 1944, while flying his 58th combat mission, he was shot down over France and taken prisoner by the German Army. Returning to the U.S. in May 1945, he was assigned as Air Inspector for the 312th Base Unit, Barksdale, La, the 19th Tactical Air Command, Biggs Field, Texas, and at Greenville, S. C. In February 1954 he was assigned to Great Falls AFB, Mont., serving as Deputy Wing Commander, 407th Strategic Fighter Wing. Colonel Malmstrom was killed in a T-33 aircraft accident on August 21, 1954, approximately one mile west of the Great Falls Airport. Great Falls Air Force Base was renamed Malmstrom Air Force Base in his honor on October 1, 1955, and formally dedicated in June 1956. source usaf portal website

patootie63
patootie63

William James Cummings Jr Born in Lawrence, Kansas, on 30 june 1911 Commander of the 355th FG at Steeple Morden between 12 nov 1942 and 4 nov 1944. Took command of the 20th FG on 1st july 1947 until 1st aug 1948 (passed away on 25 november 2007)

patootie63
patootie63

Frank B. James was born in Delavin, Wis., on 21st March 1912. He graduated from the University of California at Los Angeles in 1937 with a bachelor of arts degree and, in June of that year, entered the Army Air Corps Primary Flying School at Randolph, Field, Texas. He graduated from the Advanced Flying School at Kelly in June 1938, winning his pilot's wings and second lieutenant's commission. His first duty assignment was at Barksdale Field, La., with the 79th Pursuit Squadron, 20th Pursuit Group. In 1941, First Lieutenant James became commander of the 50th Fighter Squadron, 14th Fighter Group, at Hamilton Field. He served as commander of that unit in various locations in California and attained the grade of major before his reassignment from the unit. From June 1942 until May 1943, he served in staff positions with the IV Fighter Command in the San Francisco-Oakland Bay area. In May 1943, following his promotion to lieutenant colonel, he assumed command of the 55th Fighter Group at McChord Field, Wash. He accompanied the 55th Fighter Group to the United Kingdom, where he participated in the European Aerial Campaign. In November 1943, he was promoted to grade of colonel and, in March 1944, became chief of combat operations, Headquarters VIII Fighter Command, 8th Air Force. During this period, he was awarded the Legion of Merit for his successful planning and execution of Fighter Combat tactics against the Luftwaffe. From October 1944 to January 1945, Colonel James served as director of fighters, Headquarters 8th Air Force, United Kingdom, and in January of that year he became director of operations in the same headquarters. In August 1945, Colonel James returned to the United States to assume the position of commanding officer, McChord Field, Wash. In October 1956, Colonel James was appointed U.S. air attaché, U.S. Embassy, London. He was promoted to the grade of brigadier general in November 1956. He returned to the U.S. from England in June 1959. Brigadier General James retired on 1st June 1968 and passed away on 9th December 2004. He is buried at Arlington National Cemetery. source station131.co.uk (55th FG website)

patootie63
patootie63

Glenn E Duncan was born n 1918. Joined the 353rd FG in late 1942 (equipped with P-47) Fist victory on 23 sept 1943 (Fw190 over Nantes) became an ace on 20 dec 1943 Took over the command of the 353rd FG in nov 43. He had accumulated 19,5 victories when he was shot down and evaded with the help of Dutch Resistance (on 7 july 1944) He stayed in the Air Force after the war, among other assignments serving as White House liaison, NORAD, and with air divisions in Korea and Japan. He retired as a Colonel. His decorations include a DSC, Silver Star, DFC with 7 OLC's, Air Medal with 3 OLC's, the French Croix de Guerre, and the British DFC. source acepilots.com website

patootie63
patootie63

Donald J.M Blakeslee (born on September 11, 1917 in Fairport Harbor, Ohio.) Assigned to 401 Squadron RCAF on may 15, 1941, in England. (first victory on 22 nov 1941, destroying a Bf109) Commanding Officer of the 133 "Eagle" Squadron RAF (later activated as part of the USAAF's 4th FG, flying Spitfires then P-47) Blakeslee became Commanding Officer of the 4th FG on 1st january 1944 (now equipped with P-51) Don Blakeslee was finally grounded in September 1944, after the loss of several high scoring USAAF aces. He had accounted for 15.5 kills in the air and 2 more on the ground. He had flown over 500 operational sorties and accumulated 1 000 combat hours. Blakeslee retired from the USAF in 1965 with the rank of Colonel. One of the most decorated second world war USAAF fighter pilot. Passed away on September 3, 2008.

patootie63
patootie63

James J Stone Jr Commanded the 78th FG between 31 jul 1943 and 22 may 1944. [On 14 May 1943, the 78th encountered the Luftwaffe for the first time in combat. Leading three squadrons of 16 planes each, Col. Peterson (just promoted to full Colonel), took the 78th up to support bombers which were to attack targets at Antwerp. The Group encountered more than 20 Focke Wulf FW190s and Messerschmitt Bf109s in the Antwerp area, and dogfights broke out over the sky. Maj. James J Stone (then CO of the 83rd and later, as Lt. Col., Station CO) and Capt. Robert E Adamina of the 82nd achieved the first 78th FG victories, each shooting down one FW190] Commanded the 8th Fighter Bomber Wing at Kunsan between 24 jan and 29 may 1953 during Korean War

patootie63
patootie63

Hubert "Hub" Zemke Born in Missoula, Montana on 14 march 1914. Assumed command of the 56th FG on 16 september 1942, scoring 15 ,25 aerial victories with the "Wolfpack", added 2,5 victories with the 479th FG which he commanded after their leader was shot down. During his last combat mission on 30 October 1944, Zemke was forced to bail out of his P-51 Mustang. Captured and taken to Stalag Luft I. Following the war, he was Tactics Division Chief at the Air Tactical School, Tyndall AFB, Florida. During the Berlin Airlift, Zemke commanded the 36th FG at Furstenfeldbruck AB, Germany. He served as Chief of Staff of the 2d AD. He attended Air War College in 1953 and was assigned as Chief of Plans within the Directorate of Operations at the Pentagon. Next, he commanded the 31st Fighter Wing, Albany AFB, Georgia, followed by command of the 4080th Strategic Reconnaissance Wing at Laughlin AFB, Texas, equipped with the top secret U-2. After 3 years as Air Section Chief, US Military Assistance Advisory Group, Madrid, Spain, Zemke then commanded the Reno Air Defense Sector at Stead AFB, Nevada. Colonel Zemke retired in 1966 after 30 years of distinguished military service. Hub Zemke died on August 30, 1994. He was enshrined in the National Aviation Hall of Fame in 2002.

patootie63
patootie63

Edwin S Chickering bio (source : arlingtoncemetery.net website) "Born September 21, 1912, in Oil City, Pennsylvania. When the U.S. entered World War II, he was appointed commander of the 357th Fighter Group which he led in combat from England. In June 1944, he went into Normandy on D-Day-Plus-2 with advance elements of the Ninth Tactical Air Force to establish airfields for use by the Allies. He was subsequently named commander of the 367th Fighter Group, which he led until the war ended. During the war he was promoted to Colonel. Following World War II, he became an instructor at the Air Command and Staff School at Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama He attended the Air War College, graduating in 1950. During the Korean War, General Chickering served as deputy commander of the Air Force Fighter Weapons School in Las Vegas, Nev., and later commanded the 67th Tactical Reconnaissance Wing at Kimpo, Korea. He returned to the U.S. and became deputy chief of staff for operations of the Ninth Air Force at Pope Air Force Base, North Carolina. In 1954, General Chickering was promoted to Brigadier General and was assigned as commander of the 405th Fighter Bomber Wing and the Langley Air Force Base in Virginia. Those organizations merged in 1957 and General Chickering was named commander. In 1958, General Chickering was assigned as chief of staff for operations of the Pacific Air Forces at Hickman Air Force Base in Honolulu. He was named one year later as commander of the Pacific Air Forces Base Command, the Hawaiian Air Defense Division and Hickam Air Force Base. General Chickering returned to the mainland in 1961 and was assigned to the Office of the Secretary of the Air Force and later to the Office of the Secretary of Defense on a special project with the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency. His last military assignment followed as chief of staff to the U.S. Representative to NATO. He retired from the service in 1967. During his career, the officer, a command pilot, was awarded the Legion of Merit, the Distinguished Flying Cross with Oak Leaf Cluster, the Air Medal with seven Oak Leaf Clusters, the Bronze Star and the French Crois De Guerre with Palm. His fellow aviators, according to news stories, described his as "a combat ready flying general and a pilot's pilot." Passed away on february 14, 2003 in Little Rock, Arkansas.

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