Blue Tears on Golden Crest Records!

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Lola Sugia sang with bands and orchestras led by Pep Perry, Curt Sykes, Chet Ramage, Max Pillar, Jackie Souders, Norm Hoagy, and at Seattle's Town and Country Club with the Wyatt Howard Band.

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John R. Forrest, known as Johnny (born in 1908, died in 1971), was a multi-talented Northwest celebrity. He was an anchorman, newscaster, sportscaster, announcer (and program director) of KOL and produced a free-lance newscast on KIRO. He was also a newscaster at KFKF radio in Seattle, Washington. Upon graduating from the University of Southern California, John played repertory stock for two years and attended the Pasadena Playhouse. Former professional radio experience include KNX and KFI-Hollywood, radio plays for Lux Radio Theater, Creeps by Night and Suspense. His achievements include two plays written for old time radio Suspense Theater; "Mission Completed", aired in 1949, starring James Stewart and "The Daisy Chain" aired (circa) 1960. A songwriter, he composed "Blue Tears" (sung by Lola Sugia) and "Weathervane" (Lola Sugia), recorded and engineered at Joe Boles Recording Studio in Seattle and released on the Golden Crest Record Label. He wrote many popular Northwest radio jingles, including a long airing, catchy tune (also sung by Lola Sugia) for "G.O. Guy Drugs", and he composed an entire musical, produced at the University of Washington, called, "Johnny Appleseed". John moved to Seattle from Wyoming in (circa) 1935 and was hired by the Seattle Broadcasting Company (KOL) in 1936. Sometime during the 30's John also worked at Lux Radio Theater in Hollywood. (During its years on CBS in Hollywood, Lux Radio Theater was broadcast from the Lux Radio Playhouse located at 1615 North Vine Street in Hollywood, one block south of the intersection of Hollywood and Vine.) Throughout the 40's, 50's and early 60's John Forrrest remained at Seattle's KOL radio, and from (circa) 1968 through 1970 his voice was heard as the morning anchor, broadcasting on KFKF radio in Bellevue (owned by Kemper Freeman Sr.). In 1960 Johnny married vocalist Lola Sugia, sister of well-known Northwest musician, jazz accordionist, club owner and bandleader, Frank Sugia. Lola sang with the popular dance bands and orchestras throughout the 40's, 50's, 60's and 70's, including bands led by Wyatt Howard (at downtown Seattle's Town and Country Club), Max Pillar, Gordon Greene (at the Spanish Castle), Pep Perry, Jackie Souders, Frank Sugia, Curt Sykes and Norm Hoagy. Some of the musicians that Lola performed with are Dave Tuttle (father of Seattle drummer, Marty Tuttle), Marv Thomas (father of well known Seattle trumpeter, Jay Thomas), Terry King, Ralph St. John, Kenny Nelson, Tiny Martin, Dave Stetler, Don Anderson, Sal Carraba, Stan Keene, Red Kelly, Wayne Saxe, Bob Winn, Ronnie Pierce, John Wittwer, Mike Hobi, Dave Coleman, Gene Sargent, Joe Venuti, Hayden Shaner, Bob Winn, Joe Adams, Phil Odle, Frank Sugia, Benny Witte, Al Turay, Carle Rising, Gordy Challstedt, Rollie Morehouse, Floyd Standifer, Jack Hyde, to name a few. Together, Johnny and Lola composed songs and radio jingles. Some of John's notable friends and associates were Don McCune (Seattle's "Captain Puget"), George Peckham (musician, pianist and well-known vocal coach), Howard Hall (KING host of talk show called "Telescope"), Bill Munson (KOL), Ron Bailie (Ron Bailie's School of Broadcasting, Seattle), Pat O'day (KJR), Jerry Holtzinger (KFKF), Bill O'Mara (KFKF), Frank Roberts (KOL and KIRO), Martin Tobin (KOL), Dick Stokke (KFKF), Kearney Barton (recording engineer) Joe Boles (recording engineer), Jimmy Linden (audio engineer at KOL's Northern Life Tower and son of Adolph Frederik Linden), Larry Nelson (KOMO), Dick Keplinger, Bill Taylor and Dan Niles (KOL), to name a few. You might recall hearing John Forrest broadcasting the Seattle Seafair Hydroplane Races in the late 50's, as one of KOL's leading sportscasters, in the KOL boat, called "The KOLROY", owned by Bob Gilliam.

santellswings686
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Lola Sugia sang with many prominent dance bands and orchestras. Among the hundreds of talented Northwest musicians that she performed with are trumpeter Marv Thomas (father of Seattle's hottest trumpet player, Jay Thomas), Dave Tuttle (father of Seattle drummer Marty Tuttle), Rollie Morehouse, Dave Stetler, Carle Rising, Tiny Martin, Gordy Challstedt, Kenneth Johnson, Don Anderson, Kenny Nelson, Phil Odle, Dave Coleman, Benny Witte, Hayden Shaner and Al Turay, to name just a few.

santellswings686
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Northwest vocalist Lola Sugia started singing professionally in 1940, when she was fifteen years old. Encouraged by her well known brother, jazz accordionist and bandleader, Frank Sugia, and influenced by jazz giants Billie Holiday and Ella Fitzgerald, she performed for thirty-five years in popular dance bands, swing orchestras and jazz combos, including bands led by Wyatt Howard, Curt Sykes, Max Pillar, Pep Perry, Jackie Souders, Norm Hoagy and Frank Sugia. In 1959 Lola met songwriter, playwright and radio broadcaster, John Forrest (Johnny), while recording a radio jingle that he had composed. As their romance grew, Johnny wrote the song, “Blue Tears”, an expressive 50’s pop ballad which featured Lola’s clear warm, unaffected vocals and Patti Page style over-dubbing. The song was recorded in 1960 at Joe Boles Recording Studio in Seattle. John and Lola’s decision to sign with Golden Crest was based on Joe Bole’s recommendation, referrals from John’s associates in the radio industry, and the fact that the Sugia family’s long time friend, Stan Boreson, had recorded on the label. Musicians / accompanists on the record are Phil Odle on piano, Joe Adams on alto sax, Keith Purvis on drums, Al Wied on bass and Norm Hoagy on vibes. Lola Sugia's daughter, NW jazz and blues vocalist and bandleader Maia Santell is a mainstay in the local and regional music scene. Her voice, like her mother's, is warm, clear and natural, totally free of the contrived theatricality that besets many of her contemporaries. Her phrasing is impeccable, and she exudes the spirit and energy of the early jazz and swing vocalists from her mother's era. Known as the "Pacific Northwest Queen of Swing", Santell and her band of seasoned instrumentalists, known as "Maia Santell and House Blend", perform a musical repertoire similiar to that of the popular television show, "Dancing with the Stars", including jazz, blues, swing, Motown, Latin and contemporary favorites.

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