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santellswings686
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Some of the living descendants of Seattle's Jackson Street era of jazz are Don Anderson Jr. (son of trumpeter Don Anderson), Jay Thomas (son of trumpeter Marv Thomas), Marty Tuttle (son of trombonist Dave Tuttle), Lynn Durfy (daughter of saxophonist and arranger Ken Johnson), Molly Sargent (daughter of guitarist Gene Sargent), Ed Krafft (son of saxophonist Dick Krafft), Dave and Tim Coleman (sons of drummer, Dave Coleman), Robin Morehouse (daughter of clarinetist Rollie Morehouse), Sue and Peter Sugia (son and daughter of Frank Sugia), Darsie and Bard Beck (sons of Frank Sugia) and vocalist Maia Santell (daughter of Lola Sugia, daughter of "Tebby", saxophonist and clarinetist, and niece of Frank Sugia, accordionist and band leader). Are you a descendant of a jazz, swing or big band musician that performed in the Seattle area during the 20's, 30's, 40's, 50's or 60's? If so, it is time to start a Facebook group called, "Descendants of Seattle's Jackson Street Era of Jazz"!!

santellswings686
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Frank Sugia was known as Seattle's most popular entertainer. He hired only top notch jazz musicians in the Northwest, including Hayden Shaner, Gene Sargent, Al Turay, Bob Winn, Mori Simon, Rollie Morehouse, Floyd Standifer, Gary Steele, Don Anderson, Chuck Metcalf, Mike Hobi, Dave Coleman, Dave Stetler, Lee Humes, Dean Hodges, Red Kelly, Buddy Catlett, Bud Schultz and Joe Venuti, to name a few.

santellswings686
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Frank and Lola Sugia worked with the finest NW musicians. Some of their favorites were the players in the Seattle Rhythm Kings and Don Anderson's Dixielanders, led by trumpeter Don Anderson. The band included Don Anderson on trumpet, Rollie Morehouse on clarinet, Chuck Metcalf on bass (and later Red Kelly on bass), Dave Coleman on drums, Mike Hobi on trombone and John Wittwer on piano.

santellswings686
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Lola Sugia sang with bands and orchestras led by Norm Hoagy, Gordon Greene, Curt Sykes, Wyatt Howard, Jackie Souders, Max Pillar and Frank Sugia.

santellswings686
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Frank Sugia featured Lee Humes on vocals and bass on his album titled "Sugia's After Five". Humes is an excellent bassist, who spent many years singing and playing with a Seattle-organized group known as The Signatures. He also played in groups on the Pheonix-Las Vegas-Lake Tahoe circuit, fronted by Billy Daniels, Billy Eckstine and Della Reece. Other musicians on the album "Sugia's After Five" are Gene Boscocci on celeste, Dean Hodges on drums, Sally King on vocals, Floyd Standifer on fluegelhorn and trumpet, Bob Winn on flute, Joe Venuti on violin and, ofcourse, Frank Sugia on vocals and accordion. The arranging of the tunes on the album was done by Sugia and Gene Sargent. Sargent is also known for his stint as a guitarist and arranger for Woody Herman's First Herd.

santellswings686
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Lola Sugia sang with many prominent dance bands and orchestras. Among the hundreds of talented Northwest musicians that she performed with are trumpeter Marv Thomas (father of Seattle's hottest trumpet player, Jay Thomas), Dave Tuttle (father of Seattle drummer Marty Tuttle), Rollie Morehouse, Dave Stetler, Carle Rising, Tiny Martin, Gordy Challstedt, Kenneth Johnson, Don Anderson, Kenny Nelson, Phil Odle, Dave Coleman, Benny Witte, Hayden Shaner and Al Turay, to name just a few.

santellswings686
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Frank Sugia was known as "Seattle's most popular entertainer". He played with Jackie Souders at the Olympic Hotel's Spanish Ballroom in 1936 and in later years he opened the Olympic Bowl with Joe Venuti. The same day he graduated from Seattle's Franklin High School he went to San Francisco to work with Paul Martin's Band. He and Joe Venuti performed for Frank Sinatra, Bing Crosby and Bob Hope. Sugia attended the University of Washington, studying composition and arranging. He worked with only the finest musicians, including Joe Venuti, Don Anderson, Dave Coleman, Hayden Shaner, Gary Steele, Floyd Standifer, Dean Hodges, Bob Winn, Red Kelly, Bud Schultz, Don Smith, Al Turay, Al Wied, Dave Stetler, Glenn Martin, Rollie Morehouse, Tiny Martin, Mori Simon and Gene Sargent, to name a few. Though Sugia knew just about every jazz musician and Italian business operator in the Northwest, some of his friends and associates include Norm Bobrow, Gene Boscacci, Vito Santori, Stan Boreson, Al Bianchi, Albert and Victor Rosellini, Frank D’Aquila, Larry Nelson, Walt Evans and Joe Petosa. For three decades Sugia led the strolling minstrels at Frederick & Nelson each Christmas season and delighted children at the department store's yearly "Christmas Breakfast", with special guest, "Santa Claus". In 1969 he opened his own restaurant, called "Sugia's After Five", located on Aurora Avenue North in Seattle, and he performed at some of the best known clubs around, including The Casa Villa, The Town and Country Club (the dinner set, preceding Wyatt Howard's Orchestra), Rosellini's 410, The Olympic Bowl, The Golden Nugget in Las Vegas, The Red Carpet, The Italian Village, The Sirloin Inn, The Carriage Inn, The Elks, The Thunderbird (hotel chain), the Washington Athletic Club and the Trianon Ballroom, to name a few. According to Sugia, the after-hours clubs were the places that musicians hung out to hear "real music" and jam with other players, strictly for the love of jazz, as opposed to their nightly gigs where musicians performed commercial music, primarily for their audience. Players couldn't wait to finish their regular gigs to listen to the best jazz, blues and swing musicians that were playing at after-hours joints like the Black and Tan, The Congo, The 908 Club, The 605 Club and the Cabbie Club, located in Seattle's International District and in Seattle's Central District. In 1962, during the Seattle Word's Fair, Sugia and his trio were aired "live" at the Space Needle on KOMO TV (channel 4 Seattle) for a series called "World's Fair Holiday".

santellswings686
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Maia Santell is looking for other descendants of Seattle's Jackson Street era of jazz and swing. If you have a relative that performed in the Seattle music scene during the 20's, 30's, 40's, 50's or 60's, let's join together and start a Facebook site called "Descendants of Jackson Street Jazz".

santellswings686
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Maia Santell Northwest jazz and blues vocalist and bandleader, Maia Santell, is a descendant of Seattle’s Jackson Street era of jazz, blues and swing. Her mom, dad and uncle were prominent entertainers in the Northwest music scene, during the 40’s throughout the 70’s. Maia’s phrasing and clear, warm, unaffected vocal style can be attributed to her rich musical heritage, including attending Garfield, singing in jazz ensembles, choirs and soul bands, and performing at a young age in her uncle’s combo, The Frank Sugia quartet, which featured such jazz giants as Joe Venuti and Floyd Standifer. In her early years, Maia sang in a wide variety of idioms. After graduating from Garfield High School she sang in soul band, blues bands, jazz combos and r&b bands. While attended the UW she participated in a group called the Raretones, which patterned itself after the smooth vocal blend of Manhattan Transfer. During the late 70’s Maia was featured in her uncle’s combo, “The Frank Sugia Quartet”. In 1985 she handled the vocal chores for the prestigious John Holte Swing Band, and later drew from Holte’s rich resource pool of top Northwest instrumentalists to form her own group, “Maia Santell and House Blend”. Maia and her band, House Blend, have been performing for twenty-five years, at such leading venues as Jazzbones, The New Orleans, Jazz Alley, Muckleshoot Casino and St. Michelle Wineries, and they are a mainstay in the South Sound at Johnny’s Dock Restaurant, Studio 6 Ballroom, Gray Sky Blues Festival and the Tacoma Jazz and Blues Festival.

santellswings686
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Northwest vocalist Lola Sugia started singing professionally in 1940, when she was fifteen years old. Encouraged by her well known brother, jazz accordionist and bandleader, Frank Sugia, and influenced by jazz giants Billie Holiday and Ella Fitzgerald, she performed for thirty-five years in popular dance bands, swing orchestras and jazz combos, including bands led by Wyatt Howard, Curt Sykes, Jackie Souders, Norm Hoagy and Frank Sugia. In 1959 Lola met songwriter, playwright and radio broadcaster, John Forrest (Johnny), while recording a radio jingle that he had composed. As their romance grew, Johnny wrote the song, “Blue Tears”, an expressive 50’s pop ballad which featured Lola’s clear warm, unaffected vocals and Patti Page style over-dubbing. The song was recorded in 1960 at Joe Boles Recording Studio in Seattle. John and Lola’s decision to sign with Golden Crest was based on Joe Bole’s recommendation, referrals from John’s associates in the radio industry, and the fact that the Sugia family’s long time friend, Stan Boreson, had recorded on the label. Musicians / accompanists on the record are Phil Odle on piano, Joe Adams on alto sax, Keith Purvis on drums, Norm Hoagy on vibes and Al Wied on bass. Lola Sugia's daughter, NW jazz and blues vocalist and bandleader Maia Santell is a mainstay in the local and regional music scene. Her voice, like her mother's, is warm, clear and natural, totally free of the contrived theatricality that besets many of her contemporaries. Her phrasing is impeccable, and she exudes the spirit and energy of the early jazz and swing vocalists from her mother's era. Known as the "Pacific Northwest Queen of Swing", Santell and her band of seasoned instrumentalists, known as "Maia Santell and House Blend", perform a musical repertoire similiar to that of the popular television show, "Dancing with the Stars", including jazz, blues, swing, Motown, Latin and contemporary favorites.

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