Recent Comments made by HeatherBlythe

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Created in Aprin 1854. This image can be found at http://images.wisconsinhistory.org/700001020005/0102000077-l.jpg

Image, found in HeatherBlythe's uploads: Anti-Slave Catchers' Mass Convention · 29 Jan 2008 You

Copyright 1928 WORKERS LIBRARY PUBLISHERS, INC Foreword THE COMMUNIST FIGHT FOR THE NEGRO CAUSE The two major capitalist parties, the Republican and Democratic, and their…

Image, found in HeatherBlythe's uploads: Anti-lynching Leaflet · 17 Jan 2008 You

Margaret Richardson may have been the first North Carolinian to publicly demonstrate an interest in woman’s suffrage when she attended a National Suffrage Association convention…

Image, found in HeatherBlythe's uploads: Suffrage Poster · 17 Jan 2008 You

Call Number/Locator Item Title Campaign in Colorado [donkey with National Woman's Party sign advocating opposition to Democratic Party] Created/Published 1916…

Image, found in HeatherBlythe's uploads: Campaign in Colorado · 17 Jan 2008 You

Item Title [Suffrage envoys from San Francisco greeted in New Jersey on their way to Washington to present a petition to Congress Suffrage envoys from San Francisco greeted…

Image, found in HeatherBlythe's uploads: Suffrage Envoy · 17 Jan 2008 You

Women's rights activists picket the White House in 1917 with a sign asking, "Mr. President How Long Must Women Wait for Liberty." - Harris & Ewing This photograph is from the…

Image, found in HeatherBlythe's uploads: Women's rights activists picket the White... · 17 Jan 2008 You

One of the early and persuasive supporters of the Equal Rights Amendment to the Constitution was Mary Pickford, motion picture star of the 1920s and '30s. Pictured here, she holds…

Image, found in HeatherBlythe's uploads: Equal Rights Seals · 17 Jan 2008 You

It belonged to my Gr-great Aunt Het, (Esther Ogden 1867-1956), who was active in the leadership of the National American Woman Suffrage Association during the critical period…

Image, found in HeatherBlythe's uploads: Esther Ogden's Gavel · 17 Jan 2008 You

American women quickly learned these techniques from their English sisters. The token [at right] depicting a kneeling female slave surrounded by the words "Am I Not a Woman and a…

Image, found in HeatherBlythe's uploads: slavetoken1.jpg · 16 Jan 2008 You

Any political movement needs a symbol and a motto. The American abolitionists found theirs in the kneeling slave in chains, surrounded by the words "Am I Not a Man and a Brother."…

Image, found in HeatherBlythe's uploads: Antislavery Medallion · 16 Jan 2008 You

Realizing that sometimes words were inadequate, abolitionists also spoke through pictures. Images used to further anti-slavery agendas idealized and mythologized slaves, thus…

Image, found in HeatherBlythe's uploads: The Emancipation of Slaves - Jigsaw Puzzle · 16 Jan 2008 You

Spreading the Word horizontal rule Fierce words and vivid images were among the tools that radical “immediatist” abolitionists used to further their cause. Instead of gently…

Image, found in HeatherBlythe's uploads: Protest on Behalf of a Fugitive Slave · 16 Jan 2008 You

Abolitionist Strategies horizontal rule Abolitionists employed all manner of strategies to persuade the American public and its leadership to end slavery. One of their first…

Image, found in HeatherBlythe's uploads: "I will be heard!" · 16 Jan 2008 You

In 1828 British abolitionists created a companion figure to the already-famous "Am I not a Man" figure: a female kneeling with the caption "Am I not a Woman and a Sister?"…

Image, found in HeatherBlythe's uploads: Abolitionist Pin · 16 Jan 2008 You

Elizabeth Margaret Chandler is believed to have owned these purses; possibly one or more belonged to another member of her family. Each features a dramatic picture of a slave on…

Image, found in HeatherBlythe's uploads: Abolitionist Purses · 16 Jan 2008 You

“Jailed for Freedom” Pin, 1917 The National Woman’s Party gave silver pins, representing a cell door with a heart-shaped padlock, to members who had been “jailed for…

Image, found in HeatherBlythe's uploads: “Jailed for Freedom” Pin, 1917 · 14 Jan 2008 You

Suffrage Sash, around 1910 For the suffragist who wore this yellow sash in the early 1900s, the color of the silk was as meaningful as the “Votes for Women” slogan printed on…

Image, found in HeatherBlythe's uploads: Suffrage Sash, around 1910 · 14 Jan 2008 You